Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-25-2018, 11:16 PM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: CO
Posts: 11
Default Tire pressure Monitor System TPMS

I am wondering how many people have added on a TPMS system to the RV's that are older than 2008 when they became standard on all vehicles? But more important What brand are you using and what kind of problems have you had?
__________________

Roadie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2018, 11:29 PM   #2
Silver Member
 
BillsPaseo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: WA
Posts: 69
Default

TPMS is not standard on vehicles with GVWR over 10K lbs. On the Ford Transit it is standard on the SRW versions, but not even available as a factory option on the DRW versions. So our 2017 Winnebago Paseo (2017 Ford Transit T350HD) did not have it.

We added this system from EEZ, and are very happy with it:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009BEGV6S
__________________

__________________
2017 Winnebago Paseo
BillsPaseo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2018, 11:35 PM   #3
Silver Member
 
BillsPaseo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: WA
Posts: 69
Default

BTW, the above system saved us from having to change a tire on the shoulder of the freeway a few months back. The alarm went off when the pressure dropped to 60 PSI (where I had it set to go off). We were 10 miles from a rest area, so I decided to try to make it there to change the tire. Kept an eye on the pressure, and we made it there but the pressure was down to 20 PSI by the time we got there. There was zero indication from driving that there was anything wrong - the flat tire was an inner rear tire. Without the system, we probably wouldn't have known anything was wrong until the inner went totally flat and caused the outer to overheat and blow. Then it would have been call a tow truck time, or much worse...

Took me about 20 minutes to change to the spare in the parking lot of the rest area, which was much safer than trying to do it on the shoulder of the freeway.
__________________
2017 Winnebago Paseo
BillsPaseo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2018, 11:39 PM   #4
Silver Member
 
BillsPaseo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: WA
Posts: 69
Default

One more thing... I'm running the EEZ sensors with the outer theft preventative casing removed. They work just fine without it, and are much smaller and lighter with it removed. The only downside is that someone could steal them (at $42 per sensor when buying individually), but I don't think that is a very likely scenario.
__________________
2017 Winnebago Paseo
BillsPaseo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2018, 11:55 PM   #5
Site Team
 
avanti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 2,630
Default

IMO, TPMS is a necessity if you have dually rears (in which case they are ironically NOT mandated from the OEM).

We have the TST 507. Works very well and definitely saved our bacon when an inside rear tire failed. I would never had noticed before it shredded. Certainly saved the tire.
__________________
Formerly: 2005 Airstream Interstate (Sprinter 2500 T1N)
Now!: 2014 Great West Vans Legend SE (Sprinter 3500 NCV3 I4)
avanti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2018, 12:39 AM   #6
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: VA
Posts: 357
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillsPaseo View Post
Kept an eye on the pressure, and we made it there but the pressure was down to 20 PSI by the time we got there.
I don't think you should run a tire that is normally at 60-80 psi that low as it could damage the tire.
peteco is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2018, 02:34 AM   #7
Silver Member
 
BillsPaseo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: WA
Posts: 69
Default

Yeah, definitely not recommended, but it was only the last mile or so that it was that low, and with duallies, the other tire is actually the one you need to watch. I was monitoring the temperatures, and the good tire was starting to get a bit hot by the time we reached the rest area, but not dangerously hot yet.
__________________
2017 Winnebago Paseo
BillsPaseo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2018, 02:43 AM   #8
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 6,408
Default

I do think everyone needs to be aware that with the stem mounted sensors, especially if on extenders, the temp readings can be very much lower than actual and/or severely delayed reaction because they are just out hanging in the cool air. In the wheel sensors are much more accurate for temp than the stem mounts.


After checking the difference a few times, I basically just decided to use the pressure to determine the temp rise as it was much closer to the actual temp gun reading on the tire itself. I use 1.5 psi for every 10*F on the front and 2.0psi for the rears, and it is quite close that way.
booster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2018, 04:41 AM   #9
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: CO
Posts: 11
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillsPaseo View Post
TPMS is not standard on vehicles with GVWR over 10K lbs. On the Ford Transit it is standard on the SRW versions, but not even available as a factory option on the DRW versions. So our 2017 Winnebago Paseo (2017 Ford Transit T350HD) did not have it.

We added this system from EEZ, and are very happy with it:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009BEGV6S
I was not aware of that 10,000 GVW was a cut off for TPMS standard equipment. Glad to know. I am in a Roadtrek so my actual weight is just under 10,000.
Roadie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2018, 04:46 AM   #10
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: CO
Posts: 11
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillsPaseo View Post
BTW, the above system saved us from having to change a tire on the shoulder of the freeway a few months back. The alarm went off when the pressure dropped to 60 PSI (where I had it set to go off). We were 10 miles from a rest area, so I decided to try to make it there to change the tire. Kept an eye on the pressure, and we made it there but the pressure was down to 20 PSI by the time we got there. There was zero indication from driving that there was anything wrong - the flat tire was an inner rear tire. Without the system, we probably wouldn't have known anything was wrong until the inner went totally flat and caused the outer to overheat and blow. Then it would have been call a tow truck time, or much worse...

Took me about 20 minutes to change to the spare in the parking lot of the rest area, which was much safer than trying to do it on the shoulder of the freeway.
Is that EEZ and internal sensor or external? What prompted me to add a TPMS is having an 75 MPH left lane exit blowout on a 2 year old tire. I made it to the right across all 4 lanes before the tire was off the rim, with no rim damage but most of the side wall just gone.
__________________

Roadie is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
air pressure, tire pressure monitor, tires, tpms

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT. The time now is 01:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.