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Old 11-25-2018, 11:16 PM   #1
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Default Tire pressure Monitor System TPMS

I am wondering how many people have added on a TPMS system to the RV's that are older than 2008 when they became standard on all vehicles? But more important What brand are you using and what kind of problems have you had?
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Old 11-25-2018, 11:29 PM   #2
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TPMS is not standard on vehicles with GVWR over 10K lbs. On the Ford Transit it is standard on the SRW versions, but not even available as a factory option on the DRW versions. So our 2017 Winnebago Paseo (2017 Ford Transit T350HD) did not have it.

We added this system from EEZ, and are very happy with it:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009BEGV6S
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Old 11-25-2018, 11:35 PM   #3
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BTW, the above system saved us from having to change a tire on the shoulder of the freeway a few months back. The alarm went off when the pressure dropped to 60 PSI (where I had it set to go off). We were 10 miles from a rest area, so I decided to try to make it there to change the tire. Kept an eye on the pressure, and we made it there but the pressure was down to 20 PSI by the time we got there. There was zero indication from driving that there was anything wrong - the flat tire was an inner rear tire. Without the system, we probably wouldn't have known anything was wrong until the inner went totally flat and caused the outer to overheat and blow. Then it would have been call a tow truck time, or much worse...

Took me about 20 minutes to change to the spare in the parking lot of the rest area, which was much safer than trying to do it on the shoulder of the freeway.
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Old 11-25-2018, 11:39 PM   #4
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One more thing... I'm running the EEZ sensors with the outer theft preventative casing removed. They work just fine without it, and are much smaller and lighter with it removed. The only downside is that someone could steal them (at $42 per sensor when buying individually), but I don't think that is a very likely scenario.
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Old 11-25-2018, 11:55 PM   #5
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IMO, TPMS is a necessity if you have dually rears (in which case they are ironically NOT mandated from the OEM).

We have the TST 507. Works very well and definitely saved our bacon when an inside rear tire failed. I would never had noticed before it shredded. Certainly saved the tire.
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Old 11-26-2018, 12:39 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillsPaseo View Post
Kept an eye on the pressure, and we made it there but the pressure was down to 20 PSI by the time we got there.
I don't think you should run a tire that is normally at 60-80 psi that low as it could damage the tire.
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Old 11-26-2018, 02:34 AM   #7
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Yeah, definitely not recommended, but it was only the last mile or so that it was that low, and with duallies, the other tire is actually the one you need to watch. I was monitoring the temperatures, and the good tire was starting to get a bit hot by the time we reached the rest area, but not dangerously hot yet.
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Old 11-26-2018, 02:43 AM   #8
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I do think everyone needs to be aware that with the stem mounted sensors, especially if on extenders, the temp readings can be very much lower than actual and/or severely delayed reaction because they are just out hanging in the cool air. In the wheel sensors are much more accurate for temp than the stem mounts.


After checking the difference a few times, I basically just decided to use the pressure to determine the temp rise as it was much closer to the actual temp gun reading on the tire itself. I use 1.5 psi for every 10*F on the front and 2.0psi for the rears, and it is quite close that way.
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Old 11-26-2018, 04:41 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillsPaseo View Post
TPMS is not standard on vehicles with GVWR over 10K lbs. On the Ford Transit it is standard on the SRW versions, but not even available as a factory option on the DRW versions. So our 2017 Winnebago Paseo (2017 Ford Transit T350HD) did not have it.

We added this system from EEZ, and are very happy with it:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009BEGV6S
I was not aware of that 10,000 GVW was a cut off for TPMS standard equipment. Glad to know. I am in a Roadtrek so my actual weight is just under 10,000.
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Old 11-26-2018, 04:46 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillsPaseo View Post
BTW, the above system saved us from having to change a tire on the shoulder of the freeway a few months back. The alarm went off when the pressure dropped to 60 PSI (where I had it set to go off). We were 10 miles from a rest area, so I decided to try to make it there to change the tire. Kept an eye on the pressure, and we made it there but the pressure was down to 20 PSI by the time we got there. There was zero indication from driving that there was anything wrong - the flat tire was an inner rear tire. Without the system, we probably wouldn't have known anything was wrong until the inner went totally flat and caused the outer to overheat and blow. Then it would have been call a tow truck time, or much worse...

Took me about 20 minutes to change to the spare in the parking lot of the rest area, which was much safer than trying to do it on the shoulder of the freeway.
Is that EEZ and internal sensor or external? What prompted me to add a TPMS is having an 75 MPH left lane exit blowout on a 2 year old tire. I made it to the right across all 4 lanes before the tire was off the rim, with no rim damage but most of the side wall just gone.
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Old 11-26-2018, 04:50 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by booster View Post
I do think everyone needs to be aware that with the stem mounted sensors, especially if on extenders, the temp readings can be very much lower than actual and/or severely delayed reaction because they are just out hanging in the cool air. In the wheel sensors are much more accurate for temp than the stem mounts.


After checking the difference a few times, I basically just decided to use the pressure to determine the temp rise as it was much closer to the actual temp gun reading on the tire itself. I use 1.5 psi for every 10*F on the front and 2.0psi for the rears, and it is quite close that way.
Are you using an internal TPMS?
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Old 11-26-2018, 04:54 AM   #12
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Quote:
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Are you using an internal TPMS?

Ours are external, that is how I know that they are not very accurate.
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Old 11-26-2018, 04:54 AM   #13
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I have been using a Tire Minder 66 for about 18 months. I have taken four trips 2k mi, 3k mi, 4k mi, 10k mi. It has failed on every trip, been sent back on warranty and replaced. But what a PIA! That is why I am looking.
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Old 11-26-2018, 05:00 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadie View Post
Is that EEZ and internal sensor or external? What prompted me to add a TPMS is having an 75 MPH left lane exit blowout on a 2 year old tire. I made it to the right across all 4 lanes before the tire was off the rim, with no rim damage but most of the side wall just gone.
It is external - the sensors are in valve stem caps.
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Old 11-26-2018, 02:06 PM   #15
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After checking the difference a few times, I basically just decided to use the pressure to determine the temp rise as it was much closer to the actual temp gun reading on the tire itself. I use 1.5 psi for every 10*F on the front and 2.0psi for the rears, and it is quite close that way.

Are you saying that an increase of 1.5F PSI translates into an additional 10PSI on the front tires and +2.0 PSI is +10PSI on rear for your set up? Doyou use the temperature gun on the sidewall as soon as you stop?
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Old 11-26-2018, 03:05 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadie View Post
After checking the difference a few times, I basically just decided to use the pressure to determine the temp rise as it was much closer to the actual temp gun reading on the tire itself. I use 1.5 psi for every 10*F on the front and 2.0psi for the rears, and it is quite close that way.

Are you saying that an increase of 1.5F PSI translates into an additional 10PSI on the front tires and +2.0 PSI is +10PSI on rear for your set up? Doyou use the temperature gun on the sidewall as soon as you stop?

No, what I am referring to is the ratio of pressure increase to temperature increase. If the rear tires go up 2psi that is about a 10 degree increase in tire temperature. 4psi would be 20 degrees, etc. In the front it would if the tires go up 1.5psi their temp would be 10 degrees higher, etc.


It is a relatively easy way to tell roughly how hot the tires are if the TPMS isn't doing a fast enough or accurate enough temp reading. After a while you will know what your typical run down the road pressures level out at, so if you see a rather sudden 5psi increase, you can be pretty sure something is going on for heat also.


Of course, this method does you no good if the reason the tire is getting hot is because the pressure is low from a leak, but that should show up as a pressure reading low.


I just use a cheap infrared temp gun on the sidewall of the tire if I want an accurate reading, but now that we have good history I usually just put my hand on each of the tires when we stop for gas or a rest stop as a quick check. Our tires run quite cool, so it would be obvious if one was getting hot.



IMO, setting the high pressure alarm on the TPMS is just as important as the low pressure alarm, assuming the unit has both.
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Old 12-02-2018, 07:34 PM   #17
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We have had the tiretraker system for over 8 years now and love it. About $289 for 4 wheels. We added 4 more sensors for our smart car we tow sometimes. Only thing we have had to do was change the batteries in the sensors every few years. It has saved us a blowout more than once.
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Old 12-02-2018, 08:29 PM   #18
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I have had really good luck with the Tire Safeguard. I've had three of their systems for ten years and they have saved us many times, especially when one who will remain nameless does not like to look at the tire pressure monitor when starting driving. One unit just failed, display is very dim but alarms still work. Not bad considering its age.

I don't like the design of the cap sensors, the o-ring is too easy to mess up when replacing the battery (BTDT), but the flow thru sensors are designed much better. I do replace my valve stems with all-metal, that is a necessity IMHO. In my experience the Tire Safeguard sensors that replace the valve stem last 4-5 years.

I tried several other brands over the past year (none are mentioned on this thread so far) with the Roadtrek, none worked well. The last one loses signal no matter where I put the receiver/display, I'm going back to the Tire Safeguard for the Roadtrek.
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Old 12-02-2018, 09:18 PM   #19
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This is the system we have on our Interstate 3500. I would not drive our vehicle with out them.
https://tsttruck.com
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Old 12-02-2018, 11:46 PM   #20
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Use TST, very good, feel much better..didnít have them when I had total destruction of a tire on the Interstate in Mississippi..very scary..but need to get the temp thing adjusted better, thanks for info on that!!
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