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Old 04-27-2018, 09:16 PM   #1
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Default need help

where can i find battery isolator for 210 popular 2004 rt
thanks tony
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Old 04-28-2018, 03:31 AM   #2
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where can i find battery isolator for 210 popular 2004 rt
thanks tony
Are you looking for a dual isolator mounted on a heat sink or a relay operated separator?

What problem are you experiencing?
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Old 04-28-2018, 07:42 AM   #3
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dual isolator 4 wire
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Old 04-28-2018, 05:44 PM   #4
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dual isolator 4 wire

http://www.cooperindustries.com/cont...ST_180012q.pdf



https://allbatterysalesandservice.co...utput-1202-3ad
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Old 05-05-2018, 11:45 PM   #5
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Default Smart Isolator

You'll get better results with a "smart isolator."

The problem with dual diode isolators is the voltage regulator that controls your alternator only knows about the battery voltage on one side, that is, it's only connected to one of the two batteries; so if your house battery is low and the engine starting battery has a normal voltage, the regulator will stop charging both the house battery and starting battery until the starting battery is low enough for it to need more charge. The house battery is, in essence, just along for the ride, it is not part of the voltage regulator control loop; so it's quite common for the house battery to not get topped off with enough charge when driving.

The smart isolator eliminates this control problem, it cross connects both batteries after a set delay time, and it also reduces the voltage drop across the isolator because it uses a relay rather than silicon diodes.

You can find them on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_n...smart+isolator
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Old 05-06-2018, 12:15 AM   #6
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The other alternative is to just use a "dumb" isolation relay controlled by the van's "engine running" signal plus a Trik-L-Start.
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Old 05-06-2018, 01:25 AM   #7
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The smart isolator eliminates this control problem, it cross connects both batteries after a set delay time, and it also reduces the voltage drop across the isolator because it uses a relay rather than silicon diodes.
I think this needs some clarification. Isolators are diodes, i.e. passive semi-conductors. They are unidirectionas devices and there is no way to make them smart. The use of a device with solid state or mechanical relays to control battery paths may indeed be a smart device but it it can't be correctly described as a smart isolator because it doesn't use any isolators at all. It's typically described as a separator .
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Old 05-06-2018, 01:40 AM   #8
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Default Relay isolator

Not to quibble, but a relay is indeed an 'isolator' when in the off-state (when it is disconnected). It's more isolation (infinite ohms) than the off-state of a diode.

The 'smart' isolator has a control circuit that isolates the two batteries until the vehicle battery is partially recharged, and then closes the relay to cross connect the two so they both get the same voltage level.

If the relay is not delayed (by a 'smart' controller) it is possible that a dead house battery will sufficiently drain a good starting battery and leave you without enough charge to start the vehicle. Without the delay, you can get stuck.

And as long as we're not skipping the details, the two batteries will get the same voltage but NOT get the same current; the current sharing is determined by the intrinsic internal battery voltage and internal resistance, plus any wiring resistance, and the relay IR drop. So a faulty battery with high internal resistance won't get much of a charge with either type of isolator.

And on Amazon, they use the descriptor "Smart Isolator."
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Old 05-06-2018, 08:43 PM   #9
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Not to quibble, but a relay is indeed an 'isolator' when in the off-state (when it is disconnected). It's more isolation (infinite ohms) than the off-state of a diode.

The 'smart' isolator has a control circuit that isolates the two batteries until the vehicle battery is partially recharged, and then closes the relay to cross connect the two so they both get the same voltage level.

If the relay is not delayed (by a 'smart' controller) it is possible that a dead house battery will sufficiently drain a good starting battery and leave you without enough charge to start the vehicle. Without the delay, you can get stuck.

And as long as we're not skipping the details, the two batteries will get the same voltage but NOT get the same current; the current sharing is determined by the intrinsic internal battery voltage and internal resistance, plus any wiring resistance, and the relay IR drop. So a faulty battery with high internal resistance won't get much of a charge with either type of isolator.

And on Amazon, they use the descriptor "Smart Isolator."
I appreciate that there is stuff marketed as smart isolators. I just think that this label promotes confusion. Isolators don't require any intervention but what is described as a smart isolator is actually an ACR or separator which requires intervention, i.e. something to activate and deactivate a relay. Functionally, it may provide isolation but I think it's confusing to describe them as isolators which conventionally refers to a diode.

The relay "delay" you refer to is more complex than what you describe because it has to distinguish between potentially opposite conditions, i.e. a charged house battery with a discharged engine battery or conversely, a discharged house battery with a charged engine battery. For example, when a typical separator aka smart isolator like the Sure Power 1314/15 gets a signal from the start/run terminal on the ignition, it examines the condition of both batteries. If it determines that the engine battery is more discharged than the house battery it immediately parallels the batteries. If it determines that house battery is more discharged than the engine battery, it will not parallel both batteries until engine starting is completed.
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Old 05-06-2018, 08:53 PM   #10
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The problem with dual diode isolators is the voltage regulator that controls your alternator only knows about the battery voltage on one side, that is, it's only connected to one of the two batteries; so if your house battery is low and the engine starting battery has a normal voltage, the regulator will stop charging both the house battery and starting battery until the starting battery is low enough for it to need more charge. The house battery is, in essence, just along for the ride, it is not part of the voltage regulator control loop; so it's quite common for the house battery to not get topped off with enough charge when driving.
With conventional dual isolators, since the alternator voltage forward biases both isolator diodes how can the alternator deliver suds to only one battery?
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