Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-16-2017, 03:59 PM   #11
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Central Arizona, HiDesert & Mountains
Posts: 249
Default

What model (series) genset are we referenceing? Ours is KV series in 2013 R/T. Operator Manual date: 02-2012. Calls for 1qt (0.95L). We use recommended 15w-40 Rotella T (heavy duty diesel) oil SG, SJ/CH4 performance class. You gotta read back label of oil bottle! And change oil twice yr. Spring & late fall. Most run time on ours is monthly exercise about 1 hr+/-. Especially winter months. Use it or lose it!
__________________

AZ ADVenturist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 04:07 PM   #12
Site Team
 
avanti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,579
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AZ ADVenturist View Post
Most run time on ours is monthly exercise about 1 hr+/-. Especially winter months. Use it or lose it!
Many of us believe that the importance of frequent "exercise" of propane gensets is greatly exaggerated. That is certainly my experience.

Gasoline units may be a different matter. I've never owned one.
__________________

__________________
Formerly: 2005 Airstream Interstate (Sprinter 2500 T1N)
Now!: 2014 Great West Vans Legend SE (Sprinter 3500 NCV3 I4)
avanti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 05:44 PM   #13
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 4,504
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by avanti View Post
Many of us believe that the importance of frequent "exercise" of propane gensets is greatly exaggerated. That is certainly my experience.

Gasoline units may be a different matter. I've never owned one.
I think this is an interesting point, although I think it is a highly variable need that is based on the conditions the generator sees. The exercise for a propane unit is primarily to keep the slip rings clean of tarnish and corrosion that will hurt performance and eventually need to be cleaned. Secondarily, it can be for getting rid of any moisture in the windings, or in the engine itself. The gas units have the much more common, and faster happening, carb plugging issues to deal with besides.

If your van and generator sit inside a climate controlled storage area, so it doesn't see big swings in temperature and/or humidity, I would totally agree with what Avanti stated. As long as none of the parts see conditions that will cause condensation on them, you are pretty safe, but there are also a lot of conditions that will cause the condensation. Condensation inside the generator will tarnish the slip rings quickly, it appears.

A very common example is if the van sits outside in many parts of the country. If it gets cooler at night and van and generator cool off to a point that is lower than the dewpoint the next day, before the parts warm up, you got condensation. It can be really bad if it sits over snowy areas, that will keep it cold under the van while surrounding areas warmer and carry in moisture in the air. All you need to do is look at any car or other piece of equipment that sat outside for a while over dirt especially. The bottom will always be rustier than the top, even though it wouldn't get wet from rain. When the classic car and muscle car folks take the vehicles to storage for the winter, usually an unheated pole barn, a large % of them put plastic down under the car to prevent moisture coming up and condensing on the undercarriage. Some do it on concrete, also.

When we had a gas Onan, it was always inside in a heated garage, so itdidn't see any condensation conditions, so as long as I had treated fuel in it, I would let it go 3-4 months between runs without worrying. When I sold it after 7 years, I had it hooked up on test to show perspective buyers it ran and made spec, and it actually produced above rated output by about 5%, so the slip rings were in great shape.

If we had a propane genny stored the way ours was, I would not be worried by longer periods of non exercise. If it sat outside here in Minnesota, I would run it every month , except in the nice summer weather.
booster is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 05:51 PM   #14
BBQ
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: East
Posts: 1,137
Default

.

The problem is not so much in the generator,
but the residue gasoline left in the carburetor.

When the gasoline evaporates,
it leaves behind the wax and varnish,
which gums up the carburetor.

If you periodically add some carburetor cleaner in your fuel,
it will help alleviate the problem.
__________________
BBQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 06:29 PM   #15
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Virginia
Posts: 433
Default

What got me asking was I couldn't locate my RT Manual...now I found them - right where I didn't look!

My gen is 2.8 Gas, Model HGJBB(Spec A) and it takes 0.6L/.63qt/20oz.

Like I said, the '05 RT190 took a quart...and when I read somewhere it was 20ounces, I really got curious. Ron
__________________
Ron J. Moore
'15 RT210P
Ron J. Moore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 06:37 PM   #16
Site Team
 
avanti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,579
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BBQ View Post
.

The problem is not so much in the generator,
but the residue gasoline left in the carburetor.

When the gasoline evaporates,
it leaves behind the wax and varnish,
which gums up the carburetor.
Yes, exactly. That is why I exempted gasoline gensets from my comments. I have rebuilt enough old motorcycle carbs to take this seriously. On my bikes (and my snow blower), I always run the carbs dry before long periods of storage. I do not know if there is a practical way to do this with a gasoline genset, but if there is, I would do it religiously.

As for moisture issues, I believe that the concern is largely theoretical more than practical. Yes, of course, moisture in the air can condense on ANY unprotected metal surface. The ferrous components of a genset are no better or worse than any other similar machine in this regard. The question is whether in practice this makes any important difference. Typically, it does not. In most cases a microscopic layer of oxidation forms, which seals the surface from further oxidation. Absent salts or other rust promoters, nothing bad happens and the parts are shiny again after the first couple of revolutions in the spring. Not desirable, but no big deal either. Balancing this is the fact that every time you start the engine, new moisture is drawn into the system, and more is produced by the combustion process. This also is no big deal, unless the user fails to bring the engine fully up to temperature, in which case real damage can be done. With many years of experience with collector cars, motorcycles, small utility engines, and RVs, I have a LOT of data on this topic. I NEVER "exercise" them--I let them sleep through the winter (and sometimes MUCH longer). I have never, ever had an issue, except when I foolishly allowed gasoline to sit for long periods in carbs. Even then, it takes a LONG time to do any damage.

IMO, there are far more constructive ways to use your precious time than digging a path through the snow to run your genset for an hour in the dead of winter.
__________________
Formerly: 2005 Airstream Interstate (Sprinter 2500 T1N)
Now!: 2014 Great West Vans Legend SE (Sprinter 3500 NCV3 I4)
avanti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 07:33 PM   #17
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 4,504
Default

I think the biggest differentiation is copper vs other metals. Copper will build up oxidation thicker and thicker over time. Look at the copper plumbing in your house or the statue of liberty. The oxidation is also non conductive, and moisture greatly increases the speed of the buildup. Even power plants and stationary power system generators have exercise and slip ring maintenance and inspection criteria. How often it is needed in an RV certainly is up for grabs and opinions, but there have been many, many, folks who bought low hour RVs and the low generators in them, that found they needed to be pulled and the slip rings cleaned.
booster is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2017, 07:37 PM   #18
Site Team
 
avanti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,579
Default

I totally agree that going for years without ever running them is a bad idea. I just believe that "monthly for at least an hour" is bonkers.
__________________
Formerly: 2005 Airstream Interstate (Sprinter 2500 T1N)
Now!: 2014 Great West Vans Legend SE (Sprinter 3500 NCV3 I4)
avanti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2017, 10:52 AM   #19
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: League City, TX
Posts: 145
Default

Ours is a 2500, not 2800, but many of the principles (and challenges) are similar. I changed our oil two days ago. Blog post with pics and a few pointers here, FYI.
InterBlog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2017, 01:55 PM   #20
BBQ
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: East
Posts: 1,137
Default

.

Valvoline makes a small hand pump for changing oil in difficult to access places.
The pump fits on the oil bottle.
It costs less than $10.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Pump.jpg (25.0 KB, 3 views)
__________________

__________________
BBQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT. The time now is 02:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.