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Old 01-13-2020, 08:42 PM   #1
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Default Roadtrek RS Adventurous Inverter Upgrade

My 2006 RT Adventurous has a 750W Tripplite Inverter/Charger, which produces modified sine wave 120 VAC, which is delivered only to the galley and TV/audio outlets. These outlets also receive power when shore power or generator are connected.

The modified sine wave 120 VAC is not tolerated by modern appliances, so despite being well below the 750W rating of the inverter, trip off.

I am thinking a pure sine wave inverter will allow operation of newer appliances. My plan is to set the Tripplite to "Charge Only", and install a new 1000 or 1500W pure sine wave inverter supplied from the outlet side of the 12V relay and fed into the 120V Inverter Output receptacle.

I would note for full context that the coach batteries have been upgraded to two 6V x 235 Ah, and that a Victron Battery monitor has been added. Although the RT is also equipped with a generator, my primary objective in upgrading the inverter is to be able to make coffee or otherwise use electricity if I am without shore power and camping where generator run-times are limited.

With the extra capacity, I am also thinking the new inverter could connect to the entire AC bus. But that raises two questions, neither of which are answered by the electrical distribution diagram or the RT manual.

1. Since the two outlets powered by the inverter are also powered up when shore tie or generator are connected, what segregates the other outlets to prevent their being fed while operating just on the inverter? I am thinking diodes but am not sure where they are located.

2. If the inverter is connected to the entire 120V bus, how do I (automatically) prevent inverted 120V power being sent to the Tripplite charger and back to the battery, which would result in accelerated battery drain? A relay cutout might be one way to do this.

For context, I have already upgraded my batteries to provide 235 Ah, and have installed a battery monitoring system, and am equipped with a generator. My main objective is to support coffee maker and other devices in situations such as camping without shore tie when generator run times are limited.
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Old 01-14-2020, 12:58 PM   #2
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Maybe download and read through the manual or user guide for this Automatic Transfer Switch - Inline Transfer Relay


I think it will answer a lot of your questions as to how to safely do what you want.


Some inverters will have a built-in Automatic Transfer Switch. I think it'll all become much clearer as soon as you learn just a bit more about the function and use of that type of switch.
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Old 01-14-2020, 03:09 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by engnrsrule View Post
My 2006 RT Adventurous has a 750W Tripplite Inverter/Charger, which produces modified sine wave 120 VAC, which is delivered only to the galley and TV/audio outlets. These outlets also receive power when shore power or generator are connected.

The modified sine wave 120 VAC is not tolerated by modern appliances, so despite being well below the 750W rating of the inverter, trip off.

I am thinking a pure sine wave inverter will allow operation of newer appliances. My plan is to set the Tripplite to "Charge Only", and install a new 1000 or 1500W pure sine wave inverter supplied from the outlet side of the 12V relay and fed into the 120V Inverter Output receptacle.

I would note for full context that the coach batteries have been upgraded to two 6V x 235 Ah, and that a Victron Battery monitor has been added. Although the RT is also equipped with a generator, my primary objective in upgrading the inverter is to be able to make coffee or otherwise use electricity if I am without shore power and camping where generator run-times are limited.

With the extra capacity, I am also thinking the new inverter could connect to the entire AC bus. But that raises two questions, neither of which are answered by the electrical distribution diagram or the RT manual.

1. Since the two outlets powered by the inverter are also powered up when shore tie or generator are connected, what segregates the other outlets to prevent their being fed while operating just on the inverter? I am thinking diodes but am not sure where they are located.

2. If the inverter is connected to the entire 120V bus, how do I (automatically) prevent inverted 120V power being sent to the Tripplite charger and back to the battery, which would result in accelerated battery drain? A relay cutout might be one way to do this.

For context, I have already upgraded my batteries to provide 235 Ah, and have installed a battery monitoring system, and am equipped with a generator. My main objective is to support coffee maker and other devices in situations such as camping without shore tie when generator run times are limited.

The Roadtrek setup for inverter is quite confusing and the wiring hard to follow sometimes, assume your RS is wired the same as our 07 Chevy with a Tripplite was.


Power comes in from the shore power cord and generator to an automatic transfer switch. Which will activate to whichever power source has power on it. If both are on, it will prioritize the shore power IIRC. It has nothing to do with inverter 110v outlets at all, under any conditions.


The power from the transfer switch goes to all the outlets except the ones that get inverter power, usually about 3 outlets in a Roadtrek are on inverter so don't get the power from the transfer switch. The power also goes to the Tripplite inverter/charger from transfer switch. All of the above power gets where it is going though the main breaker/fuse box that feeds directly from the transfer switch including the Tripplite.


The power to the Tripplite from the breaker panel will run the charger section of it and will also pass the 110v power through to the outlets that would be inverter powered. When on shore power or generator, those outlets are running on shore power, but it comes through the Tripplite inverter on the way. The inverter section does not need to be on to have all this happen.


When you are not on shore power or generator, none of the outlets in the van work for 110v unless you have the inverter on, then it power those outlets that are wired to it.



The Tripplite probably has two cords plugged into it or hardwired in. One will be the shore/generator power from the breaker panel, and the other will be the outlet from the inverter that connect it to the inverter 110v outlets. That wiring from the inverter to the those special outlets is their only connection.


It can get to be a pain to get all the outlets on inverter in the van as they all have to get to the same point to receive the power and then after that point they need to be switched with an automatic transfer switch.


I did our 190P to do all of that, but no standalone transfer switch because we don't have a generator any more.



We run all the power through the Magnum MS2000 inverter/charger. Shore to Magnum, then AC output from the Magnum from its internal automatic transfer switch to old Tripplite output wiring to the inverter outlets and also back to where the transfer switch was to pick up the rest of the wiring going to the breaker panel and all the other 110v circuits through it.
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Old 01-17-2020, 03:55 AM   #4
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Thanks Booster. I have ordered a 1500W Pure Sine Inverter (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01COA0UTE/). My RT is a Sprinter so am not sure if it is exactly the same as a Chevy based RT might be.

The TrippLite does have two 110V connections as Booster describes - one feeds to a junction box that (presumably) delivers power to the inverter only outlets. The other is the 110V power supply to the battery charger. I had not considered the possibility of shore tie/generator pass through to the inverter only outlets.

So rerouting the 110V inverter outlet supply to the inverter-only outlets to come from the new (Pure Sine) Inverter may result in losing the flow through of shore tie or generator power to these outlets.

I plan to test the inverter to be sure it can actually power the keurig and TV before determining the next steps.
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Old 01-17-2020, 04:11 AM   #5
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Questions and concerns similar to your are what caused me replace my Tipplite 750 inverter/charger with another all-in-one Renogy 3000w inverter/charger. In my case it made installation a simple plug & play replacement. Just had to be sure I had room for the new unit.

I did do other upgrades at the time to lithium batteries, but that was incidental. I just had to make sure the inverter/charger I choose has a "lithium compatible" charge setting.
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