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Old 07-02-2018, 03:16 AM   #1
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Default Tool kit

What tools do you carry?
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Old 07-02-2018, 03:19 PM   #2
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I carry a toolbox with assorted metric-sized wrenches and sockets, a couple of water-pump pliers, electrical tape, multi-meter, fuses, screw-drivers (Phillips, torx, flat-head and, since the up-fitter was Canadian, Robertson). I have a socket sized to fit the water heater anode, and another that fits the Sprinter's lug nuts. I have a breaker bar that will drive either of those sockets.

I carry an air compressor and flat-fixing plugs. Also, I have a set of jumper cables, a hatchet, small saw, hammer, and nails. I carry several rolls of duct tape, and a roll of gaffer's tape.
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Old 07-03-2018, 02:08 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by rvsprinterguy View Post
I carry a toolbox with assorted metric-sized wrenches and sockets, a couple of water-pump pliers, electrical tape, multi-meter, fuses, screw-drivers (Phillips, torx, flat-head and, since the up-fitter was Canadian, Robertson). I have a socket sized to fit the water heater anode, and another that fits the Sprinter's lug nuts. I have a breaker bar that will drive either of those sockets.

I carry an air compressor and flat-fixing plugs. Also, I have a set of jumper cables, a hatchet, small saw, hammer, and nails. I carry several rolls of duct tape, and a roll of gaffer's tape.
IMO a digital volt/amp meter is essential. I would also add this inexpensive circuit tester which lets you measure the current draw on your 12VDC circuits.

https://www.harborfreight.com/30-amp...ter-67724.html
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Old 09-14-2018, 01:34 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by cruising7388 View Post
IMO a digital volt/amp meter is essential. I would also add this inexpensive circuit tester which lets you measure the current draw on your 12VDC circuits.

https://www.harborfreight.com/30-amp...ter-67724.html
The newer multimeters that incorporate a clamp meter for current measurement that will work not only on AC but DC as well are very handy.

I bought a fairly inexpensive one- maybe $60Can., I don't recall for sure, but I did a few checks of the DC clamp meter versus a regular in line digital ammeter and in the range of 5-10 amps, the measurements matched within a fraction of an amp.

I found that very handy for checking brake magnets on our travel trailers and other trouble shooting chores. So easy to take the reading.

Brian.

Brian
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Old 09-14-2018, 05:27 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by EdJodi View Post
What tools do you carry?
I carry my regular handy-man tool box (about 10-15 lbs.) and supplement it with various zip ties, bungee cords, gorilla tape, and spare blade fuses. I take my Ryobi drill and bit set. I also have a Ryobi flash light and dust buster so I already carry two batteries.

I almost left on our May trip without my tools. My thinking was I'm probably not qualified to make repairs on the road. But my wife convinced me to take them just in case. Used most everything except the fuses and bungee cords on the trip. It saved our vacation.
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Old 09-14-2018, 05:59 PM   #6
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I carry a basic set of sockets, wrenches, pliers (Knipex plierwrench), etc. Some specialty tools for the Roadtrek: Roberson bits (in Picquic multi-bit screwdriver), plumbing clamp tool. I also just bought a Ridgid 1/2" impact for removing & installing tire if needed. I have an adapter for the impact that takes hex-base bits. Besides hex screwdriver bits from the Picquic, I have a set of drill bits with hex base and hex base socket adapters that can be used in the impact. And a multimeter. A small box with a variety of tools: pick, minisaw, tweezers, tire plug tool and plugs, mini-prybar, etc.
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Old 09-15-2018, 01:40 PM   #7
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We have the usual grab bag of tools, and I'm unhappy with it because there's so much RUMMAGING involved. It's amazing how many times a tool is needed when one is on the road for five weeks, which I just was. I need better organization.

I'm thinking of getting the one being sold by Millionmilesprinter because we have a T1N Sprinter, for which this one is a good match:

https://www.millionmilesprinter.com/...he-road-tookit

The more difficult question is "What *hardware* do you carry, including spare parts?" That I haven't figured out yet. I've got a disorganized jumble on that front, too.

Driving from Houston to Nova Scotia last month, I actually had to detour into Philadelphia to have Joel (Millionmilesprinter) replace my alternator (IIRC it was Avanti who asked on another thread what the problem was - we still have not done the troubleshooting, but I will post back). Joel is a great guy, and here's that same toolkit which he also uses for his own work, pic taken during that little misadventure of mine.

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Old 09-15-2018, 02:06 PM   #8
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I have the normal, jumbled up, tool bag with sockets, combo wrenches, various pliers, and all the other normal but not special tools. I is maybe 10X10X15 inches, but heavy. Fits in the front passenger sidepod storage on our 07 C190P Roadtrek easily. I also have my older Fluke multimeter, and the most overlooked tool to have I think, a small soldering iron.


Space is just to valuable in a B, so I will live with the digging through the bag for what I need, which has to this point been quite a rare occurrence.


We do keep a stubby, interchangeable tip, screwdriver in the cabin, though, as stuff invariably seems to come loose.
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Old 09-15-2018, 04:07 PM   #9
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Sears sells a nice clamp on which measures both AC and DC current, as well as voltage and resistance. It is also equipped with a thermocouple probe to measure temperature.
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Old 09-15-2018, 04:16 PM   #10
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I carry a metal toolbox 18x6x5 which just fits into the space by the indoor water tank on my
210P. I carry a 1/4 drive socket set (very useful), a 3/8 drive ratchet and small selection of sockets, 1/2 drive for the water heater anode plug, slip joint, 2 vice grip, needle nose pliers, big flat screwdriver, changeable bit screwdriver, stubby interchangeable bit screwdriver, side cutter, wire stripper, utility knife, AC/DC Clamp on multi-meter, electrical tape, tie wraps and a compartment box with fuses, screws, washers, self reset circuit breakers and other miscellaneous junk.
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