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Old 07-13-2018, 07:30 PM   #1
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Default Hello From Texas

Howdy. I'm in the early stages of research. I plan to become a full time solo RV'er. It's a bit daunting trying to decide which Class B to choose. I figured as a single person I didn't need anything very large but was baffled to find that the smaller the Class B, the more expensive it is. I love the idea of the Winnebago Revel or the Roadtrek SS Agile, but the price of the two make them out of my reach as they are nearly doubled the price of the larger Class Bs. The new models with the lower price points tend to have the strangest floor plans with the bed right in the middle where you have to crawl over it to get to the toilet.

I'm sure I'll find something for me at the price I'm able to afford. Glad to have these forums to help with the research.
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Old 07-13-2018, 08:21 PM   #2
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Welcome! There are a lot of options at various price points - I'm sure you'll find something that suits your needs.
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Old 07-13-2018, 08:39 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by UnderSky View Post
Howdy. I'm in the early stages of research. I plan to become a full time solo RV'er. It's a bit daunting trying to decide which Class B to choose. I figured as a single person I didn't need anything very large but was baffled to find that the smaller the Class B, the more expensive it is. I love the idea of the Winnebago Revel or the Roadtrek SS Agile, but the price of the two make them out of my reach as they are nearly doubled the price of the larger Class Bs. The new models with the lower price points tend to have the strangest floor plans with the bed right in the middle where you have to crawl over it to get to the toilet.

I'm sure I'll find something for me at the price I'm able to afford. Glad to have these forums to help with the research.
Look at both Travato models. Great value.
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Old 07-14-2018, 12:08 PM   #4
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Welcome! Just yesterday, I hatched this thread on another forum. It focuses on the forum brand, but a lot of the pointers will be suitable for prospective buyers who have not yet settled on a brand or configuration to purchase.

I will say that, if you plan to (1) full-time, and you plan to (2) do it sanely, and you plan to (3) do at least some of it in Texas, then your needs are not going to be the same as the average buyer's needs. You are likely going to need a lot more capability than the casual user who simply hooks up at KOA. If I were you, I would focus strongly on that aspect of your decision tree.
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Old 07-14-2018, 04:49 PM   #5
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Welcome! Just yesterday, I hatched this thread on another forum. It focuses on the forum brand, but a lot of the pointers will be suitable for prospective buyers who have not yet settled on a brand or configuration to purchase.

I will say that, if you plan to (1) full-time, and you plan to (2) do it sanely, and you plan to (3) do at least some of it in Texas, then your needs are not going to be the same as the average buyer's needs. You are likely going to need a lot more capability than the casual user who simply hooks up at KOA. If I were you, I would focus strongly on that aspect of your decision tree.
Thanks for the welcome and also that link. I do worry about my learning curve since I plan to fulltime. I'm looking for something that's suitable for boondocking even if I do plan to hook up at campgrounds or rv parks half the time as well. I'm not a bit concerned that it's highly likely I'll get a lemon. It seems like everyone I talk to has an RV that has spent months in the shop every year.
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Old 07-14-2018, 09:12 PM   #6
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Given that you are not going to be a casual Class B user, the big questions are (1) how handy are you, and (2) how badly do you want a successful outcome? If you fail on either of those answers, you might have big problems with your venture.

My husband and I decided to invest in a Class B instead of a cottage. This way we have a "cottage" that we move from place to place.

It has been one of the coolest things I've ever done in my life, but it literally has taken us thousands of DIY hours and something approaching $20K in components to turn our off-the-lot Class B into what we need for our context and application. And of course it's still not perfect. But it has been working for us both personally and professionally (knock wood).
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Old 07-14-2018, 10:43 PM   #7
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Hmm, I'm not very handy. Sure, I could figure out how to fix a problem with a leaky toilet in my house, but I doubt I could figure out how to fix anything in a running vehicle. I can change a tire and that's the extent of my handiness with automobiles. It's hard to get an actual sense of what people's lives are really like when they spend it living in RVs.

I'm starting to think that living out of my minivan and having zero creature comfort would have better outcomes for the average person... This has zero appeal to me. Like you I want a traveling cottage, not to be sleeping in the backseat of my car and peeing in a coffee can. Yuck.
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Old 07-14-2018, 11:20 PM   #8
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I had zero mechanical ability when my husband and I started this gig. I've learned a hell of a lot in the past four years! Hopefully it will help stave off dementia.

I was open to learning, and willing to take on DIY projects, some of them massive. My husband is an engineer and a car hobbyist (Ford Mustang restoration) so his experience provided quite a head start on our learning curve. But this lifestyle definitely is not for everyone.
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Old 07-15-2018, 01:15 AM   #9
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I had zero mechanical ability when my husband and I started this gig. I've learned a hell of a lot in the past four years! Hopefully it will help stave off dementia.
Oh it will definitely stave off dementia, but whether it will stave off homicide..... well, the jury is still out.
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Old 07-15-2018, 01:37 AM   #10
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.

Some people lose their hair after working on the RV for a while.

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