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Old 06-13-2016, 01:28 AM   #191
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Possibly too many plans! I'm a nurse getting out of the Big City. Hopefully the remote job will work out long enough for me to get across the country a few times. I'm interested in talking to folks on the road about healthcare - have you heard of anyone doing this or good health plans for RVers? Any info welcome!
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Old 06-13-2016, 02:01 AM   #192
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Are you thinking of being a contract traveling nurse working temporarily in places around the country? I know one person, now totally retired, who used to do that with her retired husband traveling in a Class A. I know several registered nurses, including my wife, who get together at Class B socials and rallies and discuss nurse war stories.

My wife and I are retired and on Medicare with United Health Group (promoted by AARP) for supplemental insurance. We went that way because my former employer's retirement plan subsidized some of it for a while (since dropped.) We are covered equally everywhere in the United States and we don't have to depend on in network care which I found to be a big pain in the back money wise and pain wise seeking emergency care for a kidney stone out of network with the plan I had when employed.
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Old 06-13-2016, 10:37 PM   #193
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I've reached out to some recruiters for RN travel opportunities but I haven't worked clinically in a hospital for a few years - major spinal surgery after turning a patient has kept me in administrative roles and I'm now working for lawyers as a Legal Nurse Consultant. I've been looking around the boards/sites for other RNs who travel - it would be great to offer some healthcare talks around the country to other travelers!
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Old 06-14-2016, 01:17 AM   #194
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DH and I were travel nurses for 15 years - 7 years out of our 5th wheel. But we worked open heart ICU and ER. One gig you could do if you wanted to work thru a company that requires no direct patient care is e-icu - remote monitoring of small, usually rural hospital ICUs. Did that a few times. Interesting. But if your back injury allows, you could get your first aid/CPR instructor certificate from AHA and then teach classes at the larger RV parks that cater to snowbirds. We saw parks in Arizona that had hundreds and hundreds of sites. Most snowbirds we met aren't comfortable doing CPR or with the workings of an AED (as evidenced by the many witnessed arrests that rolled thru the ER where no one had done CPR) and I would think during season you could hold a couple classes a month at each park. If you wanted to stick with administration, the larger hospital corporations frequently hire temps to fill open management jobs. Good Luck with your travels. I'm sure you'll find a niche.
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Old 06-14-2016, 01:48 AM   #195
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DH and I were travel nurses for 15 years - 7 years out of our 5th wheel. But we worked open heart ICU and ER. One gig you could do if you wanted to work thru a company that requires no direct patient care is e-icu - remote monitoring of small, usually rural hospital ICUs. Did that a few times. Interesting. But if your back injury allows, you could get your first aid/CPR instructor certificate from AHA and then teach classes at the larger RV parks that cater to snowbirds. We saw parks in Arizona that had hundreds and hundreds of sites. Most snowbirds we met aren't comfortable doing CPR or with the workings of an AED (as evidenced by the many witnessed arrests that rolled thru the ER where no one had done CPR) and I would think during season you could hold a couple classes a month at each park. If you wanted to stick with administration, the larger hospital corporations frequently hire temps to fill open management jobs. Good Luck with your travels. I'm sure you'll find a niche.
My back is actually pretty good and I would love to teach first aid/CPR to snowbirds - what a great idea!
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Old 06-14-2016, 03:20 AM   #196
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You could also get certified in fire extinguisher training. It's now done with an extinguisher that has a laser light and you shine it on a backboard. It sounds a little silly but it teaches people the fundamentals of how to use one.

That is something everyone could learn as well.
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Old 06-15-2016, 01:27 AM   #197
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AND the old ones.
Someone set a bunch of christmas trees on fire on New Year's Eve last year and I was the only one who knew how to work the fire extinguisher!
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Old 06-18-2016, 11:51 PM   #198
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Hello!
Alejandro & Sandra, Spaniards expts writting from Ontario. Totally new in the RV world but not new camping in a vehicle. We are going to change our beloved camping-car for a 2007 Pleasure Way Plateu TS in a few days, very excited about it but scared at the same time! There's so much for us to learn...
I am glad we found this community
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Old 06-22-2016, 01:37 AM   #199
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We just took delivery of a 2016 Roadtrek Zion SRT on 6/8/2016.
Noticed next morning coolant on ground. Had to be flatbedded to Chrysler service.
Just got it back today, drove great. But when I plug into shorepwer I can't tell if I'm getting electrical juice because I have to flip on the inverter to get the roof ac, the microwave or tv to work and I have on all the switches like coach battery and ecotrek switch. Why would I need inverter to be on if I'm plugged in ????
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Old 06-22-2016, 03:00 AM   #200
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Originally Posted by GAislandgirl View Post
We just took delivery of a 2016 Roadtrek Zion SRT on 6/8/2016.
Noticed next morning coolant on ground. Had to be flatbedded to Chrysler service.
Just got it back today, drove great. But when I plug into shorepwer I can't tell if I'm getting electrical juice because I have to flip on the inverter to get the roof ac, the microwave or tv to work and I have on all the switches like coach battery and ecotrek switch. Why would I need inverter to be on if I'm plugged in ????
I believe the Zion inverter needs to be on for any of the functions to operate including the AC power pass through and definetly the battery charger.

Consider joining the Roadtrek Owners Group on Facebook to connect with other Zion owners...
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