Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 02-08-2018, 04:59 PM   #121
jon
Platinum Member
 
jon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Seattle
Posts: 257
Default

I recommend renting the length RV that you want to buy. Even rent a short Sprinter and a long Sprinter. Then you can determine first hand which type works better for you. Hands on experience can be more valuable than any amount of internet research.

Before we bought a 144" WB Sprinter we rented from CamperVans North America. They were great we rented out of Las Vegas and the owner met us at the airport to take us to the office. We did a five day canyon loop. Grand, Zion, and Bryce Canyons. One of the highlights was leaving the campground before light and driving to Sunrise Point where I went back to sleep and the wife took pictures of the sunrise. After cooking breakfast in the parking lot we were off to the next canyon. That trip pretty well cemented the plan for a campervan.

I wish you luck on your search. We too were going to get a TT but thankfully never did because we use the van for everything; camping, traveling, moving, and hauling kids.

Jon
__________________

jon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 01:40 AM   #122
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Ontario
Posts: 391
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by indoorsy View Post
hi Avanti, There were other factors too.... I appreciate your thoughts on the matter and all the advise over the course of my odyssey.

Phoebe, Thank you for your insight. Buying used is definitely something I'd like to do... As I got further into my research on the Class B MH's, the warranty seemed like a safety net I'd like to have - being up in the price category wasn't where I originally intended to be and if it were an easier thing with less steep a learning curve than it would feel more comfortable, but that's not the case.

JRobe, I'm here... you can address your comments directly to me rather than refer to me in the third person. Thank you for the suggestion of renting. It is a good one and something I intend on pursuing. It has been suggested multitudes of times earlier on the thread and without the rude undertone. The flip flopping was as a result of all I learned on here. I don't live in a state with a lot of RV resources, and it is the middle of winter so getting out in a rental isn't currently possible. I'm using the time to read and visit showrooms and while doing so I learned a lot and shared a lot to those helpful people on here so they could point out what I still don't know (blessedly, in a giving and kind fashion). It's a process and I'm doing fine.

We can learn a great deal from these forums, but also at times get information overload! As well, it is very easy to over react to negative remarks about a particular aspect when perhaps 1% are complaining about something and 99% are totally happy - but don't say so! Unhappy people seem much more likely to make comments!

As for trailer versus motorhome - particularly class B in this case, I think it really depends on you own preferred lifestyle and what is important to you - don't think trailers are without issues, although of course they are less complex. Each certainly has pros and cons.

We have had trailers for the last 45 years or so - and still do at present our forst was 20 ft, the 27, now a 31 ft Airstream.

We have enjoyed them all - I thik the biggest negative issues we have had have been ..........

(1) Water leaks. Causing serious interior damage causing walls to delaminate and floors to rot - very expensive to repair properly. If you have the ability- and space to do your own repairs great otherwise, get the check book out! Continual attention to caulking can go a long way to reducing this problem. I believe the same issue exists with large class A and C motorhomes, but to a much lessers exten with a Class B due its van shell.

(2) Parking. Obviously depends on your situation. I have never been able to park a trailer at our house in a suburban area. I can apply for a permit tp park it on the street outside our house for 15 nights a year. So each trip, I use up twoof these nights - i bring it home to pack the day before we leave - then take it back to storage the day after we get home when it is unpacked and clean.

I currently pay $1000 a year for fenced and gated storage about 35 minutes from where we live. Some places we have stored trailer at have suffered from vandalism - the place we use now - so far - has been good.

I don't begrudge paying the money, but more importantly the trailer gets relatively little use - one long winter trip and maybe a week or so in the summer. It is just too much of a hassle to bring it home to pack for a weekend trip.

As well, out of sight out of mind - I know I don't look after it nearly as well as I would if it were here at home with us.

(2) Appliances - same issue with all RV's they can be problematic , fridges, air conditioners hot water heaters and furnaces - I've had my share of problems with all! Most often minor electrical issues relating to corroded connectors and bad grounds. The less you use the equipment and teh less you look after it, the more the problems. It is satisfying when you manage to fix them yourself - but frustrating when they crop up at the worst times - like when you need them!

(3) Handling - a longer trailer can put you at quite a disadvantage in getting into many sites - in fact with our current trailer there are many state, federal, and provincial parks that we just have to miss. The sites are just physically too small - and even if the sites were big enough, some take real skill to back into if the access roads are narrow. twisty, and heavily treed! I get very at times trying to get our trailer into a site while holding everyone u on the access road! embarrassed

As well, depending on your equipment driving the highways can be a white knuckle affair due to trailer sway due to cross winds, being passed by 18 wheelers etc. Our current trailer is pretty good but it cost me over $3000 for a special hitch (Hensley) to achieve this - and that hitch can have quite a learning curve to hook up quickly! Nearly caused divorce when we first bought it!)

Further more my wife refuses to try towing the trailer. any others dont have a problem, but mine is deathly afraid of it!

(4) Getting fuel can be a problem - it is fine at major truck stops on the interstates, but small town gas station can be not at all trailer friendly in their layout - at times I have had to back away from pumps once filled! It is worse if you need to also find the pump that has diesel, as we do at present!

Sounds as though I am really down on trailers! I am not! Once set up, you have a real home away from home - lots of space, all the storage you want, and the tow vehicle to run around town in so you don't need to pack everything up each time you need to go into town!

Trailers are best suited to people who wish to drive to a destination and stay for an extended time. Motorhomes and vans are better suited if you like to change locations often.

Just possible food for thought!

We still enjoy our trailer and this weekend will be heading out for seven weeks in the warm weather (once we get out of the snow.)

I am now very seriously considering a class B as we approach our last few RV'ing years as I believe we will get much more use out of it - day trips, weekends, as well as longer trips. I can keep it at home and enjoy looking after is , my wife can drive it, even if only in an emergency, and a big plus to me is that we can stop almost anywhere with it.

If we find it just too confining for an extended winter stay, then my plan is to use it for the journey, then rent a condo or "double wide" at destination and use teh van as our local transportation.

There is no doubt we will miss all the space we now have, but I am thinking that for us, the advantages will outweigh the disadvantages - sure hope I am right as it is quite a change! We did however happily camp in a VW Westfalia with our two kids back in the seventies, so it is not entirely foreign to us!

Hope this helps rather than just adds further to confusion and makes your decision more difficult!

Brian.
__________________

<<B-Guy>> is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 03:38 AM   #123
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 77
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jon View Post
I recommend renting the length RV that you want to buy. Even rent a short Sprinter and a long Sprinter. Then you can determine first hand which type works better for you. Hands on experience can be more valuable than any amount of internet research.

Before we bought a 144" WB Sprinter we rented from CamperVans North America. They were great we rented out of Las Vegas and the owner met us at the airport to take us to the office. We did a five day canyon loop. Grand, Zion, and Bryce Canyons. One of the highlights was leaving the campground before light and driving to Sunrise Point where I went back to sleep and the wife took pictures of the sunrise. After cooking breakfast in the parking lot we were off to the next canyon. That trip pretty well cemented the plan for a campervan.

I wish you luck on your search. We too were going to get a TT but thankfully never did because we use the van for everything; camping, traveling, moving, and hauling kids.

Jon
hi Jon,
Thank you... There is something I am trying to figure out which perhaps you have the answer... So you flew into Las Vegas and were able to spend a week in the rental RV. This is something I would like to do because there are not a lot of rental opportunities close by to me that would give me relevant (or what I think would be relevant) experience. I notice that many of the rental options that seem really appealing to me are on the other side of the country. Given the expense involved purchasing a rig, I can certainly justify the cost to fly in, but my question to you... if you are flying in, how do you bring the sleeping apparatus as well as cook ware, clothing, etc. etc. etc... - perhaps they supply bedding and cooking supplies? I would love the name of the company you used since it sounds like a successful experience. I traveled to Zion, Bryce, Lake Powell, etc. when my kids were little. It was a soul altering experience and probably when I started thinking about life on the road - we drove down a long stretch from one destination to the next (i think vegas to lake powell)... drove through a some tumbleweeds that looked like giant pieces of popcorn spinning around, just something I'd never experienced here in New England. And those red rocks -can't get them out of my head. Want to get back there and next time in a camper.
indoorsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 04:03 AM   #124
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 77
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingeezer View Post
We can learn a great deal from these forums, but also at times get information overload! As well, it is very easy to over react to negative remarks about a particular aspect when perhaps 1% are complaining about something and 99% are totally happy - but don't say so! Unhappy people seem much more likely to make comments!

As for trailer versus motorhome - particularly class B in this case, I think it really depends on you own preferred lifestyle and what is important to you - don't think trailers are without issues, although of course they are less complex. Each certainly has pros and cons.

We have had trailers for the last 45 years or so - and still do at present our forst was 20 ft, the 27, now a 31 ft Airstream.

We have enjoyed them all - I thik the biggest negative issues we have had have been ..........

(1) Water leaks. Causing serious interior damage causing walls to delaminate and floors to rot - very expensive to repair properly. If you have the ability- and space to do your own repairs great otherwise, get the check book out! Continual attention to caulking can go a long way to reducing this problem. I believe the same issue exists with large class A and C motorhomes, but to a much lessers exten with a Class B due its van shell.

(2) Parking. Obviously depends on your situation. I have never been able to park a trailer at our house in a suburban area. I can apply for a permit tp park it on the street outside our house for 15 nights a year. So each trip, I use up twoof these nights - i bring it home to pack the day before we leave - then take it back to storage the day after we get home when it is unpacked and clean.

I currently pay $1000 a year for fenced and gated storage about 35 minutes from where we live. Some places we have stored trailer at have suffered from vandalism - the place we use now - so far - has been good.

I don't begrudge paying the money, but more importantly the trailer gets relatively little use - one long winter trip and maybe a week or so in the summer. It is just too much of a hassle to bring it home to pack for a weekend trip.

As well, out of sight out of mind - I know I don't look after it nearly as well as I would if it were here at home with us.

(2) Appliances - same issue with all RV's they can be problematic , fridges, air conditioners hot water heaters and furnaces - I've had my share of problems with all! Most often minor electrical issues relating to corroded connectors and bad grounds. The less you use the equipment and teh less you look after it, the more the problems. It is satisfying when you manage to fix them yourself - but frustrating when they crop up at the worst times - like when you need them!

(3) Handling - a longer trailer can put you at quite a disadvantage in getting into many sites - in fact with our current trailer there are many state, federal, and provincial parks that we just have to miss. The sites are just physically too small - and even if the sites were big enough, some take real skill to back into if the access roads are narrow. twisty, and heavily treed! I get very at times trying to get our trailer into a site while holding everyone u on the access road! embarrassed

As well, depending on your equipment driving the highways can be a white knuckle affair due to trailer sway due to cross winds, being passed by 18 wheelers etc. Our current trailer is pretty good but it cost me over $3000 for a special hitch (Hensley) to achieve this - and that hitch can have quite a learning curve to hook up quickly! Nearly caused divorce when we first bought it!)

Further more my wife refuses to try towing the trailer. any others dont have a problem, but mine is deathly afraid of it!

(4) Getting fuel can be a problem - it is fine at major truck stops on the interstates, but small town gas station can be not at all trailer friendly in their layout - at times I have had to back away from pumps once filled! It is worse if you need to also find the pump that has diesel, as we do at present!

Sounds as though I am really down on trailers! I am not! Once set up, you have a real home away from home - lots of space, all the storage you want, and the tow vehicle to run around town in so you don't need to pack everything up each time you need to go into town!

Trailers are best suited to people who wish to drive to a destination and stay for an extended time. Motorhomes and vans are better suited if you like to change locations often.

Just possible food for thought!

We still enjoy our trailer and this weekend will be heading out for seven weeks in the warm weather (once we get out of the snow.)

I am now very seriously considering a class B as we approach our last few RV'ing years as I believe we will get much more use out of it - day trips, weekends, as well as longer trips. I can keep it at home and enjoy looking after is , my wife can drive it, even if only in an emergency, and a big plus to me is that we can stop almost anywhere with it.

If we find it just too confining for an extended winter stay, then my plan is to use it for the journey, then rent a condo or "double wide" at destination and use teh van as our local transportation.

There is no doubt we will miss all the space we now have, but I am thinking that for us, the advantages will outweigh the disadvantages - sure hope I am right as it is quite a change! We did however happily camp in a VW Westfalia with our two kids back in the seventies, so it is not entirely foreign to us!

Hope this helps rather than just adds further to confusion and makes your decision more difficult!

Brian.
Brian, Thank you so much for your very generous post... It is really helpful to hear what you've learned. I only wish I had even a smidge of your experience. As for trailering my experience is limited to helping my ex-husband get his boat in the water. I'd drive and back it up while he directed me from the town ramp. I do say that the boat went in a different direction than what I thought it would be eventually I'd manage to get it. I think it is a situation where practice makes perfect.

I hear you on all accounts. It seems you say there is work and maintenance whichever route you go so make sure the route you go meets your needs. I love the idea of the easy travel in a Class B -take off and get into places where the TV/TT combo would be difficult. The trade off seems to be taking care of another engine that in my case would be difficult to maintain as well as difficult to use as an extra daily vehicle and also one that I am not familiar with. I've got a driveway that has two slots -one for my car, and one that will fit either the MH or the TT/TV combo as long as the TT/TV isn't too long - can probably accommodate about 40 feet.

I can see the benefits of both and if I can rent something that approximates the options I am considering I think that would be really helpful. I think I had originally focused on sleeping positions as the most important thing - then I took a test drive on a windy day and got blown around by some 18 wheelers and had a different set of criteria for evaluating how to move forward.

Thank you again! Appreciate all your thoughts, K
indoorsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 04:03 AM   #125
jon
Platinum Member
 
jon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Seattle
Posts: 257
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by indoorsy View Post
hi Jon,
Thank you... There is something I am trying to figure out which perhaps you have the answer... So you flew into Las Vegas and were able to spend a week in the rental RV. This is something I would like to do because there are not a lot of rental opportunities close by to me that would give me relevant (or what I think would be relevant) experience. I notice that many of the rental options that seem really appealing to me are on the other side of the country. Given the expense involved purchasing a rig, I can certainly justify the cost to fly in, but my question to you... if you are flying in, how do you bring the sleeping apparatus as well as cook ware, clothing, etc. etc. etc... - perhaps they supply bedding and cooking supplies? I would love the name of the company you used since it sounds like a successful experience. I traveled to Zion, Bryce, Lake Powell, etc. when my kids were little. It was a soul altering experience and probably when I started thinking about life on the road - we drove down a long stretch from one destination to the next (i think vegas to lake powell)... drove through a some tumbleweeds that looked like giant pieces of popcorn spinning around, just something I'd never experienced here in New England. And those red rocks -can't get them out of my head. Want to get back there and next time in a camper.
Hi Indoorsy,
Bob Swan from Campervan North America, LLC set us up in the van. He supplied sleeping bags, if I remember correctly, and cooking utensils so the only thing we needed were clothes.
Campervan North America rent vans out of Montana also near Glacier and other places, but in the Spring only the Grand Canyon park was the camp-able location.
Good luck. We stayed the first night at Lake Mead by the Hoover Dam.
jon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 06:57 AM   #126
Platinum Member
 
GeorgeRa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Location: Portland, Oregon
Posts: 1,477
Default

Best of luck in your endeavor, after tents in seventies we went a full circle Ė 2 Westfalias > Trailer > Truck Camper > Trailer > and back to the future with the current Sprinter 144WB. We love it.
GeorgeRa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2018, 01:36 PM   #127
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 77
Default

Thank you Jon for that contact info...

And Georgera, that's quite a journey and lot of rigs! Wondering what my list will be down the road... thank you!
indoorsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2018, 04:08 AM   #128
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: Seattle
Posts: 12
Default

What is the Suburban Insomnia? I'm looking at an Airstream Interstate with this system.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BBQ View Post
.

One tip I can offer you in your search...

Look for an RV with the Truma Combi. This is the next-gen furnace and hot water heater combo. Designed and made in Germany, it is small, quiet, and efficient. If you have ever suffered the Suburban insomnia, this Truma will make you very happy.

dw8928 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2018, 04:49 AM   #129
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Missouri
Posts: 89
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dw8928 View Post
What is the Suburban Insomnia? I'm looking at an Airstream Interstate with this system.
I think the "Insomnia" bit is just referring to how much noise the Suburban furnace makes when running. I haven't used mine much, but I do recall that the nights I did use it were.... well, not the most restful nights I've had in my RV.
__________________

__________________
2003 Roadtrek 190 Popular
Gryphon is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT. The time now is 07:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×