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Old 06-19-2019, 03:29 AM   #1
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Default Advice on Roadtrek 190 / 1997 - 2002

Hello!

I have been wanting to jump into the Class B pool for a while now, and have started looking at the Roadtrek 190 models. It's reasonably priced, so I can get my feet wet without breaking the bank - there seems to be many available locally or not to far from Palm Springs, CA with mileage ranging from 50k - 175k. Because it's based upon a Dodge 3500 van, it's not intimidating to me - I can easily work on the platform, and it's relatively inexpensive to fix. I realize there are drawbacks to the gasoline vs. diesel, but at the price point - perhaps they are worth it. In any case - I'd love to get some feedback from folks that know.

Are these decent entry-level Class B RVs?

What would be the things to look out for when inspecting?

Any helpful Beta for a newbie would be most appreciated!

Thank you kindly!!
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Old 06-19-2019, 04:13 AM   #2
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Hello!

I have been wanting to jump into the Class B pool for a while now, and have started looking at the Roadtrek 190 models. It's reasonably priced, so I can get my feet wet without breaking the bank - there seems to be many available locally or not to far from Palm Springs, CA with mileage ranging from 50k - 175k. Because it's based upon a Dodge 3500 van, it's not intimidating to me - I can easily work on the platform, and it's relatively inexpensive to fix. I realize there are drawbacks to the gasoline vs. diesel, but at the price point - perhaps they are worth it. In any case - I'd love to get some feedback from folks that know.

Are these decent entry-level Class B RVs?

What would be the things to look out for when inspecting?

Any helpful Beta for a newbie would be most appreciated!

Thank you kindly!!
Welcome to the forum dsafian!

No matter what motor home you choose, it needs to be mechanically sound in order for you to enjoy your travels. An older motor home like you are suggesting, makes that more of a challenge. But if you are comfortable with the mechanics of the Dodge van, then the Roadtrek should be a good choice as you say "to get your feet wet without breaking the bank".

Normal things to check are engine, brakes, tires, transmission, cooling, a/c etc. You can have these items checked by a mechanic, or if you feel competent you can do so by checking for leaks, fluid condition, and make sure no smoke is coming out of the exhaust. Take a lengthy test drive under different road conditions to test the suspension, brakes, and steering. Get it up to operating temperature, highway speeds, and make sure you're out long enough that the motor doesn't overheat. Check all the coach appliances, generator, roof air, water pumps, batteries, etc.

Expect to fix and/or replace some items as this would be normal. If the price is right and it takes into consideration these items, then make the call as to whether it's the right rv for you. Took us over a year to find our '2012 class b. Happy with the purchase, yet I've had to spend several thousand dollars on roof a/c, batteries, tires, shocks, macerator, and water pump among other things. Now that those items are fixed, no problems on our last several long trips.

Good luck, keep us informed, and feel free to ask any questions. This forum is a great resource.
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Old 06-19-2019, 05:07 AM   #3
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Welcome to the forum dsafian!

No matter what motor home you choose, it needs to be mechanically sound in order for you to enjoy your travels. An older motor home like you are suggesting, makes that more of a challenge. But if you are comfortable with the mechanics of the Dodge van, then the Roadtrek should be a good choice as you say "to get your feet wet without breaking the bank".

Normal things to check are engine, brakes, tires, transmission, cooling, a/c etc. You can have these items checked by a mechanic, or if you feel competent you can do so by checking for leaks, fluid condition, and make sure no smoke is coming out of the exhaust. Take a lengthy test drive under different road conditions to test the suspension, brakes, and steering. Get it up to operating temperature, highway speeds, and make sure you're out long enough that the motor doesn't overheat. Check all the coach appliances, generator, roof air, water pumps, batteries, etc.

Expect to fix and/or replace some items as this would be normal. If the price is right and it takes into consideration these items, then make the call as to whether it's the right rv for you. Took us over a year to find our '2012 class b. Happy with the purchase, yet I've had to spend several thousand dollars on roof a/c, batteries, tires, shocks, macerator, and water pump among other things. Now that those items are fixed, no problems on our last several long trips.

Good luck, keep us informed, and feel free to ask any questions. This forum is a great resource.
Appreciate the quick and thoughtful response. Standard vehicle vetting, I totally get. Thanks for the details needs specific to RV ownership - very much appreciate it.
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Old 06-19-2019, 06:11 AM   #4
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Ditto rowiebowie's comments. So I bought a 97 PW more in the vintage that you're describing. It had unusually low miles and a remarkable interior. BUT in the 3 years that I've had it here are some of my expenses:

Before I first drove it home from my inlaws who I bought it from:

Minor engine tune up; new serpentine belt, adjust tranny replacing fluid and filter, lube drivetrain ujoints, drain and refill rear end, repack all wheel bearings, replace front brakes and front shocks. 4 new tires. Drain water heater and replace anode, new cabin battery, replace circuit board in heater.

That was all, surprisingly, done for $2200 because it was primarily done by a father/son shop that we've used for over 20 years.

Expenses after that were primarily by choice:

Add solar panel/controller. Add better battery monitoring capability.
New cabin battery charging. Upgraded radio (it had a radio/cassette!!).
Surge protection.

And then routine maintenance expected of any vehicle (oil changes,etc.).

Point: My RV is in the age range of what you're looking at. All of rowiebowie's observations are correct. What I'm adding is that usually with a vehicle that age you'll have to immediately sink a bit of extra cash into it to get it up to snuff.
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Old 06-19-2019, 01:23 PM   #5
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That vintage of Dodge had issues with handling, especially in wind, so be sure to drive it in windy conditions and around semis on the freeway. It is not consistent between vans and can go from poor handling to scary depending on the unit. Very low, low miles ones can sometimes be the ones that folks were uncomfortable driving. The handling can be made better, but probably not great, with a number of modifications like new steering boxes, alignment specs, rear springs, shocks, swaybars, wheel spacers, tires, etc. but it can add up.
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Old 06-19-2019, 02:55 PM   #6
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I have a 2001 Dodge Roadtrek 190 Popular. It is the perfect size for two people and maybe a dog. It has a very workable layout, plenty of storage, and a galley that can actually be used (by one person). The outside storage along the driver's rocker panel can easily hold the jack, electrical cords and adapters, water hoses and several other items. The storage area accessed by the back door can hold chairs, screen house, small barbecue etc.

The generator is mounted under the rear of the vehicle behind the rear wheels. There is an access cover, but it has limited access for repair. If you need major work, the generator needs to be dropped. (An expensive job for labor, bit doable by a backyard mechanic). There are parts and service manuals available and parts can be ordered directly from Onan.

Chassis components and drivability do vary as Booster has stated above. I'd recommend the heavy duty Bilstein shocks and a steering stabilizer (Dodge Ram Steering Gear Box Stabilizer). This unit is easily installed and fits perfectly. I recently installed new brake drums, front rotors and loaded front calipers by Centric. The drums and rotors were their Premium version and the rebuilt front calipers were reasonably priced and made a big difference. (I replaced these components primarily due rust). If you need front end components, such as steering, ball joints, control arms, and bushings, Moog makes almost every part for the Dodge chassis. If you need upper and lower balljoints, consider getting the whole upper and lower control arm which includes new ball joints. (I wish I had known this before I replaced my ball joints). Some people replace the rear springs with new, aftermarket or custom springs from a truck repair facility or use several versions of helper springs. I have noticed that Dodge has discontinued many parts for this series of vehicle, but aftermarket companies provide parts or truck companies can do suspension work.

My RV has a solar panel and two AGM batteries. The interior lights are all LED and the previous owner installed USB ports in several places. The solar keeps the batteries charged and gives us some freedom when no electric hook-ups are available. We still cannot run the AC or microwave, (except by the generator) but with the ceiling exhaust fans and the windows open, fresh air is easily circulated.

The size of the 190 is perfect for parking and going into a city. The main concern is the large turning radius if doing a U turn. The 4 speed automatic transmission (3 speed plus overdrive) is suited to the engine. When I am going up or descending a long grade, I often disengage 4th gear or overdrive, by a simple push of the button (very convenient). The transmission easily downshifts (kicks down) with a firm push of the pedal making hills doable. The 318 (5.2L) engine has more than enough horsepower and torque to power the vehicle when fully loaded.I drive about 60-65 and get 15MPG on the highway and 13-14MPG in very hill terrain with ing periods of 2nd and 3rd gear use, like the Blue Ridge Parkway of Cabot Trail in Canada.

When evaluating the vehicle, I approach it as an automobile and a house. Check the systems of each in detail. In terms of an RV (house section), everything is compact and tightly fitted together. Often things have to be moved or accessed to get to major systems for repair. The biggest concern of the older vehicles is rust and if there has been interior water damage. Mold and mildew smells are not easily removed once they get into cloth or foam.

Good luck with your purchase.
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Old 06-20-2019, 08:04 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by dsafian View Post
Hello!

I have been wanting to jump into the Class B pool for a while now, and have started looking at the Roadtrek 190 models. It's reasonably priced, so I can get my feet wet without breaking the bank - there seems to be many available locally or not to far from Palm Springs, CA with mileage ranging from 50k - 175k. Because it's based upon a Dodge 3500 van, it's not intimidating to me - I can easily work on the platform, and it's relatively inexpensive to fix. I realize there are drawbacks to the gasoline vs. diesel, but at the price point - perhaps they are worth it. In any case - I'd love to get some feedback from folks that know.

Are these decent entry-level Class B RVs?

What would be the things to look out for when inspecting?

Any helpful Beta for a newbie would be most appreciated!

Thank you kindly!!
You've already gotten some great, detailed responses, so I'll just add that these are great entry-level Class B's! I've owned a 1998 Coach House, a 2000 Coach House, and now a 1999 Roadtrek 190 Popular for about the past 13 years. I've been fortunate and haven't had to do too many big repairs. Most of mine have been vehicle related, and not so much the house part. While there are some things I liked much better in my first Coach House, the Roadtrek definitely has more storage spaces. My Coach Houses had around 74,000 miles on them when I got them, and the Roadtrek had 39,000. I thought the lower miles would be an advantage, but not in this case. It looked like the Roadtrek had been a bit neglected in some areas and sat too much, while the two Coach Houses were in much better shape, mechanically and physically.

I mostly use mine to travel to dog shows but have gone as far as from Iowa to Vermont and back. I currently travel with 7 small dogs. I'm planning on living in it full time in 3 years. There's a Facebook group for owners of the older Roadtreks that you might also check out (2004 and older).

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Old 06-27-2019, 06:01 PM   #8
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Two years ago I bought a 2003 Roadtrek 190 popular with 25,000 miles on it. I took it to a mechanic and had it thoroughly inspected and he could find nothing wrong with it. The gentleman who owned it was a friend of mine from our church and had it for 12 years and took excellent care of it. It’s on a Chevrolet 1 ton extended wheelbase Sa two years ago I bought a 2003 Roadtrek 190 popular with 25,000 miles on it. I took it to a mechanic and had it thoroughly inspected and he could find nothing wrong with it. The gentleman who owned it was a friend of mine from our church and had it for 12 years and took excellent care of it. It’s on a Chevrolet 1 ton extended wheelbase chassis. I highly recommend the Chevy over the Dodge for all of the reasons listed above. The Dodge has a much shorter wheelbase which is part of the reason for the handling problems. We’ve taken the camper on several long trips and have had no problems with it at all. Mileage seems to be consistently 15 or 16 miles per gallon. The advantage of a Chevy chassis is that you can get service pretty much anywhere in North America.
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Old 06-27-2019, 06:34 PM   #9
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Default All depends on your price range...

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Originally Posted by dsafian View Post
Hello!

I have been wanting to jump into the Class B pool for a while now, and have started looking at the Roadtrek 190 models. It's reasonably priced, so I can get my feet wet without breaking the bank - there seems to be many available locally or not to far from Palm Springs, CA with mileage ranging from 50k - 175k. Because it's based upon a Dodge 3500 van, it's not intimidating to me - I can easily work on the platform, and it's relatively inexpensive to fix. I realize there are drawbacks to the gasoline vs. diesel, but at the price point - perhaps they are worth it. In any case - I'd love to get some feedback from folks that know.

Are these decent entry-level Class B RVs?

What would be the things to look out for when inspecting?

Any helpful Beta for a newbie would be most appreciated!

Thank you kindly!!
In my opinion years are way more important than mileage....a low mileage 20-25 years old vehicle is more of a gamble than a 10 years old vehicle with many more miles on the odometer.

If the vehicle has a generator make sure you can see if its been used and serviced regularly.

With any used vehicle "condition is everything".

Good luck.
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Old 06-27-2019, 08:16 PM   #10
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I have made two replies and each time I posted it said I was not logged in.
Lost the lengthy and informative post.

I am done. Don't know what is the problem.

Maybe this will work.
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Old 06-27-2019, 08:56 PM   #11
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Default Dodge RV maintenance issues

Some issues that show up with Dodge based RVs are listed below. I've owned two of them.

The triple windows up top in the roof eventually leak. If you reseal them, there are two versions of gaskets, so get the right year. Mine stopped leaking just from loosening the screws around the frame, so apparently over-tightening them is part of the problem.

Sloppy steering -- from worn-out bushings in the steering box. Two front end shops quoted huge repair estimates to repack bearings or replace the ball joints, and both overlooked the actual problem. Once I found the problem, there is an add-on bearing that fixes the problem available from DodgeRamSteeringStabilizer.com It made so much difference on my high-mileage Roadtrek, that I installed on on my low-mileage PleasureWay, even though it didn't have a problem, just to keep the steering box from going bad.

Coach battery is buried deep in a back recess, and never gets any maintenance. This is a real problem with flooded lead-acid batteries that need water added. The solution is simple, get a maintenance free battery and you won't have to look at it for years.

If the gas gauge or fuel pump stops working, there are only two types of fuel modules available. Even though it's sold by several name-brand companies, the one with a plastic filter on the bottom is junk. Mine failed in less than six months. Find a Carter N.O.S. (new old stock) fuel module with a metal ring around the pick-up filter. Those are original equipment. You have to drop the fuel tank, and it requires a really long deep well socket to remove the nuts from the J-bolts holding up the tank. I made one by grinding six flats on an old deep-well socket, and jambing it into another deep-well socket. Replace the fuel pressure regulator and doughnut gasket on the filler neck at the same time. To put the tank back in, there is a specific distance to tighten up the J-bolts in the service manual. If you need it, I can look it up.

Other than that, the Dodge chassis is easy to maintain. Just about any part can be found, and there are lots of N.O.S. parts on ebay for not much money. Just stay away from the junk.
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Old 07-01-2019, 10:08 PM   #12
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That vintage of Dodge had issues with handling, especially in wind, so be sure to drive it in windy conditions and around semis on the freeway. It is not consistent between vans and can go from poor handling to scary depending on the unit. Very low, low miles ones can sometimes be the ones that folks were uncomfortable driving. The handling can be made better, but probably not great, with a number of modifications like new steering boxes, alignment specs, rear springs, shocks, swaybars, wheel spacers, tires, etc. but it can add up.
I have a PW on a model year 2000 Dodge RamVan 3500 chassis which I've driven over 35,000 miles and hear that all the time about handling issues with this chassis. If you have wheel spacer to make the front and rear tracks equal to one another, correct tire pressures, decent shock absorbers (Monroe, Koni or Bilstein), decent tires (Firestone Transforce HT or Michelin Defenders or equiv.), air shocks (or equivalent) for the rear axle and drive at a reasonable speed for the crosswind conditions, handling issues are minimal. The wheel spacers cost $250 plus shipping from SuperSteer. Air shocks vary but cost <$500 if you skip the onboard air compressor. These two items plus correct tire pressures and driving at the appropriate speed make a huge difference in handling. The tires & shock absorbers can be upgraded next time need replacement, at a nominal extra cost.
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Old 07-02-2019, 08:18 PM   #13
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I have a PW on a model year 2000 Dodge RamVan 3500 chassis which I've driven over 35,000 miles and hear that all the time about handling issues with this chassis. If you have wheel spacer to make the front and rear tracks equal to one another, correct tire pressures, decent shock absorbers (Monroe, Koni or Bilstein), decent tires (Firestone Transforce HT or Michelin Defenders or equiv.), air shocks (or equivalent) for the rear axle and drive at a reasonable speed for the crosswind conditions, handling issues are minimal. The wheel spacers cost $250 plus shipping from SuperSteer. Air shocks vary but cost <$500 if you skip the onboard air compressor. These two items plus correct tire pressures and driving at the appropriate speed make a huge difference in handling. The tires & shock absorbers can be upgraded next time need replacement, at a nominal extra cost.
I can't say enough good things about them.... they know what they are doing..

My local RV shop referred me to discuss my situation and the results were amazing......

There's no excuse for poor steering or handling... it's dangerous to you and everyone else on the road.....

Just don't do it....I can certainly understand why there's a lot of poor handling RV's, all classes that have such low mileage..... those damn things are scary to drive if they don't have what's needed.... and people just don't go very far..... that's very sad.
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Old 07-23-2019, 03:03 PM   #14
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I'm interested in this Dodge Ram Stabilizer to prevent this stressful wandering, but I want to know if it is a proven cure-all. How many people out there are happy with it and how many didn't find any improvement ?
We have a '00 190 Popular, and thank you for your responses.
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Old 07-23-2019, 03:21 PM   #15
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I'm interested in this Dodge Ram Stabilizer to prevent this stressful wandering, but I want to know if it is a proven cure-all. How many people out there are happy with it and how many didn't find any improvement ?
We have a '00 190 Popular, and thank you for your responses.

Not a Dodge owner, but I think you will find that there is no cure all for handling issues in any of the chassis, and especially with the Dodges. There are lots of contributing factors beyond what the stabilzer can address.


It will take care of the issue of a loose lower steering gear bearing and the steering play associated with the bearing. It will also take care of the Dodge specific frame flexing at the steering gear mount, which is present on them.


Most owners have reported that it certainly helped the wandering, a few that it corrected it a lot. It all depends on what else needs to be addressed. No one that I recall ever said it made it worse or even that it had no effect.
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Old 07-24-2019, 05:36 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by StormnDale View Post
I'm interested in this Dodge Ram Stabilizer to prevent this stressful wandering, but I want to know if it is a proven cure-all. How many people out there are happy with it and how many didn't find any improvement ?
We have a '00 190 Popular, and thank you for your responses.
I put one on my 2001 Roadtrek Popular 190. Most of my front end parts and steering box had previously been replaced, so my RV drove pretty good. Some wander at highway speed, but nothing extreme. I put it on as a preventative measure and keep the steering box from excessive wear. I noticed a slight improvement, but with it on I know the shaft is being supported on both ends and will stay true in the bearings.

the Steering Stabilizer is reasonable priced and well made, can be installed by a handy do-it-yourselfer and is well designed. If the shaft in the steering box has excessive play, this will probably not be a total fix. I would make sure your steering box is functioning well, if not, replace the steering box and put the steering stabilizer on to keep it true.
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Old 12-11-2019, 02:23 PM   #17
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Default Dodge Steering Stabilizer

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Originally Posted by StormnDale View Post
I'm interested in this Dodge Ram Stabilizer to prevent this stressful wandering, but I want to know if it is a proven cure-all. How many people out there are happy with it and how many didn't find any improvement ?
We have a '00 190 Popular, and thank you for your responses.
I may be too late in responding to this question, but I wanted to share that I had the Dodge Steering Stabilizer installed on my 1998 Dodge Roadtrek 190 Popular last summer and it helped SOME with the squirrelly driving (on the highway/at speeds over 40-45 only in my experience), but definitely did not resolve the issue, and has not been a cure-all for me.

I did also buy four new high quality load range E tires and had them installed and balanced, and I run them at 65psi front and 80psi rear as recommended. I'm still seeking a real solution to the squirrelly driving though.

I hope you've found a solution to resolve your stressful wandering. If so, I would greatly appreciate knowing what you did to improve the driveability.

Thank you!
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Old 12-11-2019, 06:29 PM   #18
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I have posted this on this forum previously with no specific reply as to whether it still applies to late '90's Dodge products.

When we owned several Chrysler products of the late 60's to early 70's variety (a long time ago, I know) with recirculating-ball steering boxes, we were able to adjust out some of the manual steering play. The boxes had a bolt on the top with a slot to fit flat screwdriver tip and a lock nut. You could loosen the lock nut, turn the bolt clockwise and test drive to see if the adjustment worked. When you turned a corner and the steering was slow to return to center, you knew you tightened too much and needed to back out about 1/2 a turn.

Afterwards, the on-center steering play would be about half or less than before and reduced the amount of steering correction needed.

Did cars with power steering and recirculating-ball steering still have this adjustment feature in the late '90's?
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Old 12-11-2019, 11:23 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by StormnDale View Post
I'm interested in this Dodge Ram Stabilizer to prevent this stressful wandering, but I want to know if it is a proven cure-all. How many people out there are happy with it and how many didn't find any improvement ?
We have a '00 190 Popular, and thank you for your responses.
OK!! Back in late July I posted the above quote, and installed this wonderful add-on in August ... so after 2 months on the road, there was a vast improvement in eliminating the unwanted wandering. My stress and tension levels have also disappeared, along with grinding teeth and pucker moments!
I HIGHLY recommend this to anyone who has and displays the "DUI drifting".
Happy motoring to all, Keep on Trekkin' !
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Old 12-12-2019, 01:16 AM   #20
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I have an ‘02 190 and it’s been great and at 100,000 runs strong.
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