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Old 06-29-2018, 02:45 AM   #1
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Default Anybody install SumoSprings?

I’m looking at installing a set of Sumo Springs on the rear my Promaster Conversion van. Has anybody used these? I’ve read they reduce the side roll.
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Old 06-29-2018, 03:42 AM   #2
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If you can't find reams of testimonials on it using a google search, or searching this site, head over to Facebook and look in the Travato owners group or Class B Camper Vans group.
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Old 06-29-2018, 12:50 PM   #3
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I installed front and rear Sumo Springs on a 2018 Travato. They are easy to install, you don't even have to remove the tires. There are a few good videos on You tube that will give you some good installation tips.

I only drove the Travato less than 100 miles without the Sumo Springs, so I don't have much to go on to make a before / after comparison. After installation, the Travato still has some body roll, but it isn't horrible. It handles pretty well on the highway at 65-70 MPH, after that is gets a little busy. I am happy with the Sumo Springs, but I would still like to try a few more things to improve the handling.
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Old 06-29-2018, 01:02 PM   #4
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Sounds good, if you find anything else to help reduce the body roll please post it here. I’m looking to eliminate as much as possible, I don’t like that feeling of tipping over.
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Old 06-29-2018, 02:03 PM   #5
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It seems that everyone is installing them over on the Roadtrek/Hymer Promaster pages on Facebook. AND everyone is very happy and recommends them. It does raise the height between 1-1.5"


Those that have installed after a couple years of driving without are probably the happiest.
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Old 06-29-2018, 02:31 PM   #6
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Awesome! I’ll start with the rear and see how it goes, then fronts if needed. The next step will be the rear bilstein shocks
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Old 06-29-2018, 02:46 PM   #7
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I just installed a road master rear anti swaybar on my 2006 pleasureway. Incredible improvement in reduction of body roll in turns.
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Old 06-29-2018, 03:09 PM   #8
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Iíll definitely look into it.
Is it a direct bolt on item?

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I just installed a road master rear anti swaybar on my 2006 pleasureway. Incredible improvement in reduction of body roll in turns.
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Old 06-30-2018, 03:17 AM   #9
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I looked into anti sway bars and found a comparable Hellwig, for a lot less that the Roadmaster. Might be my next project before the shocks.

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I just installed a road master rear anti swaybar on my 2006 pleasureway. Incredible improvement in reduction of body roll in turns.
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Old 06-30-2018, 06:40 PM   #10
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550.00 US
Direct bolt on to my knowledge. May have had to drill a hole in frame though. Mine also has a set of 2" rear wheel spacers. Really impressed with the sway bar.
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Old 06-30-2018, 06:56 PM   #11
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A Hellwig is a compatible item and is only $309 US
But Iím not sure if one will fit on my Carado Banff as it has a rear bathroom and the holding tank and drain pipe might be in the way.
Hoping somebody can add some info on this.

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550.00 US
Direct bolt on to my knowledge. May have had to drill a hole in frame though. Mine also has a set of 2" rear wheel spacers. Really impressed with the sway bar.
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Old 07-01-2018, 08:02 PM   #12
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Dave and Irene Carey of the Youtube channel Carey on Vagabond installed them on their Roadtrek Zion SRT (Promaster chassis) and seem very happy. Just search for them on Youtube and look at their recent video uploads...
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Old 07-04-2018, 09:11 PM   #13
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I installed my Sumo Springs today. It took 20 minutes, start to finish. I took it for a short ride and actually went fast around some corners and there was virtually zero body roll. I highly recommend these.
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Old 07-05-2018, 03:27 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mumkin View Post
It seems that everyone is installing them over on the Roadtrek/Hymer Promaster pages on Facebook. AND everyone is very happy and recommends them. It does raise the height between 1-1.5"


Those that have installed after a couple years of driving without are probably the happiest.
For our Chevy, Etrailer offers either Super Spring or Timbren as compatible. However, the Timbrens cost nearly twice as much. Anybody familiar with the differences between the two products?
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Old 07-05-2018, 07:18 AM   #15
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Default Get an opinion from these guys....

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Iím looking at installing a set of Sumo Springs on the rear my Promaster Conversion van. Has anybody used these? Iíve read they reduce the side roll.
If you want to save some headache... I would first have a phone conversation with Super Steer in Grants Pass Oregon... they've been doing upgrades on these vehicle for years... OH, don't worry you won't have to drive to Oregon.... they work with a number of RV shops and even if you are confident that you can do it yourself....

Call and talk with them... their number is 541-326-4033......

After I spoke with them they advised me to install new KONI FSD shocks.. anti-sway bar and trac bar... every situation is different...... can't hurt to call...

In my case... they told me that adding the Sumo Springs was NOT a good idea..
I'm very pleased with the results... they have been doing these upgrades since 1961....

Good luck....
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Old 07-05-2018, 12:19 PM   #16
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When adding springs, even rubber type springs, you are increasing the spring rate. It is possible that the added spring rate will be just right and help with handling and comfort. It is equally possible that it won't turn out just right and that the increased spring rate (if it is not adjustable) will result in a harsher ride.

My first choice in helper springs would be air bags. You can adjust the pressure in the bags to better fix the original problem and minimize the negative affects. I installed air bags on the rear of my GMC van Class B and it was a fairly straight forward project. I can precisely adjust the side to side and front to rear ride level the van by changing the air pressure in each bag.

The huge front leaf springs on my Class A are old and tired and the rig would crash onto the hard rubber bump stops on the frame when encountering highway to bridge transitions etc. making for an uncomfortable, jarring ride. The rig already has rear air bags. I purchased Sumo's for the front for a quick and easy fix even though I knew that air bags would be a sure fix based on my prior experience. My excuse was that I had several projects on the go at the time and didn't want the added work of installing air bags. The added Sumo's solved the ride harshness really nicely - night and day difference in comfort. That is all it solved though. The rig still sits slightly nose down when the rear air bags are adjusted to reduce body roll when driving. There's now a slight bounciness at the front that would have likely been avoided by using air bags. I wish I had purchased air bags for the front as it would have been the better overall fix.

Both rigs mentioned above have rear anti sway bars, rear air bags and Bilstein shocks all around. The GMC van also has a front anti sway bar. Both rigs are body on frame type. Newer B van's are unibody type. There was one topic here that mentioned possible unibody frame damage on a Sprinter van when adding a spring where the unibody was not originally designed to take suspension forces. I didn't follow that topic or look into it further because I don't have a unibody type RV. It is probably something that should be looked into when deciding what handling fixes are best for your rig.
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Old 07-05-2018, 03:21 PM   #17
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Default Kudos to you for installing your own air suspension...

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Originally Posted by markopolo View Post
When adding springs, even rubber type springs, you are increasing the spring rate. It is possible that the added spring rate will be just right and help with handling and comfort. It is equally possible that it won't turn out just right and that the increased spring rate (if it is not adjustable) will result in a harsher ride.

My first choice in helper springs would be air bags. You can adjust the pressure in the bags to better fix the original problem and minimize the negative affects. I installed air bags on the rear of my GMC van Class B and it was a fairly straight forward project. I can precisely adjust the side to side and front to rear ride level the van by changing the air pressure in each bag.

The huge front leaf springs on my Class A are old and tired and the rig would crash onto the hard rubber bump stops on the frame when encountering highway to bridge transitions etc. making for an uncomfortable, jarring ride. The rig already has rear air bags. I purchased Sumo's for the front for a quick and easy fix even though I knew that air bags would be a sure fix based on my prior experience. My excuse was that I had several projects on the go at the time and didn't want the added work of installing air bags. The added Sumo's solved the ride harshness really nicely - night and day difference in comfort. That is all it solved though. The rig still sits slightly nose down when the rear air bags are adjusted to reduce body roll when driving. There's now a slight bounciness at the front that would have likely been avoided by using air bags. I wish I had purchased air bags for the front as it would have been the better overall fix.

Both rigs mentioned above have rear anti sway bars, rear air bags and Bilstein shocks all around. The GMC van also has a front anti sway bar. Both rigs are body on frame type. Newer B van's are unibody type. There was one topic here that mentioned possible unibody frame damage on a Sprinter van when adding a spring where the unibody was not originally designed to take suspension forces. I didn't follow that topic or look into it further because I don't have a unibody type RV. It is probably something that should be looked into when deciding what handling fixes are best for your rig.
"Everything is easy when you know what to do"

I'm not mechanically inclined to do anything like that which is WHY I farm this out to a professional and get professional advice..😁😁😁

I have a 2012 RS Adventurous which is on the 2011 Mercedes Benz Sprinter 3500 with the dual wheels....it is definitely a "UNIBODY" construction.... And, the clearances for on the Roadtrek Adventurous are notoriouusly small..... besides... I wouldn't invest thousands of dollars in an air suspension... we're talking more than $8,000 or more..... my new shocks, sway bar and trac bar cost $3,100... only $780 of this was labor.... which didn't sound unreasonable to me....

YES... I was specifically discouraged from installing Sumo Springs... sure.. I could have done it..they said skip it...it would make my vehicle ride more harshly... They were honest with me... you know I appreciate that advice....

For my situation...I saw no benefit in looking at the the possibility of air suspension... just too much... I know that some people and specialty shops do that....if they have unlimited funds and want to spend their money on this....go ahead...

A Class A is a completely different thing...and, so is a body on frame construction..... especially an older vehicle like a 1997.... or a non McPherson struts suspension ....

What do you think would fare better in an accident...?? The UNIBODY or the body on frame??
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Old 07-05-2018, 04:17 PM   #18
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I think the $8000 air suspension system you mention is a replacement suspension system and not just helper springs. I wouldn't know if add-on air bags are even an option for Sprinter. Add-on air bags are available for Promasters.

IIRC it was around CDN$1,300.00 for 4 Bilsteins, 2 Air Lift Ultimate bags & Hellwig sway bar for my GMC van. That basic van has changed structurally very little since the 1997 model year - still a box frame. I'd expect the cost to do the same upgrades on a 2018 GM product to be similar to what I paid: approx US$1,000.00 for parts.

Air Lift rear bags for current GM/Chevy vans cost around US$350.00 and about the same for Ram Promasters.
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Old 07-05-2018, 05:39 PM   #19
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Default Sumo springs

Search YouTube for Mali Mish Travel Vlogs, they just installed a set.
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Old 07-05-2018, 05:42 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 View Post
"Everything is easy when you know what to do"

I'm not mechanically inclined to do anything like that which is WHY I farm this out to a professional and get professional advice..😁😁😁

I have a 2012 RS Adventurous which is on the 2011 Mercedes Benz Sprinter 3500 with the dual wheels....it is definitely a "UNIBODY" construction.... And, the clearances for on the Roadtrek Adventurous are notoriouusly small..... besides... I wouldn't invest thousands of dollars in an air suspension... we're talking more than $8,000 or more..... my new shocks, sway bar and trac bar cost $3,100... only $780 of this was labor.... which didn't sound unreasonable to me....

YES... I was specifically discouraged from installing Sumo Springs... sure.. I could have done it..they said skip it...it would make my vehicle ride more harshly... They were honest with me... you know I appreciate that advice....

For my situation...I saw no benefit in looking at the the possibility of air suspension... just too much... I know that some people and specialty shops do that....if they have unlimited funds and want to spend their money on this....go ahead...

A Class A is a completely different thing...and, so is a body on frame construction..... especially an older vehicle like a 1997.... or a non McPherson struts suspension ....

What do you think would fare better in an accident...?? The UNIBODY or the body on frame??
Who is they said skip it. Sumos make a world of difference on an NCV3 Sprinter. I did them all the way around. No harshness at all. They help a bunch with the bounce and sway inherent in the Sprinter upfits, also the rocking when someone is walking around inside. I would do them again in a second if I bought another one...
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