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Old 06-11-2019, 10:37 PM   #1
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Default Are used RVs getting more expensive with the increased price of new RVs????

I read that "used RVs" particularly nice models are selling at a premium price now with the escalation of new Class B's selling over $150,000 and more....
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Old 06-12-2019, 12:51 AM   #2
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I read that "used RVs" particularly nice models are selling at a premium price now with the escalation of new Class B's selling over $150,000 and more....

I think they went crazy high right as the recession ended because so few new were sold during the recession. They have stayed there ever since, and I haven't noticed a huge increase, but they are all very expensive for what they are, IMO.
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Old 06-12-2019, 02:13 AM   #3
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A class B is more of a specialty item when it comes to rv"s, you are getting a whole lot of RV in
a small package, so that makes them more expensive to build as compared to a class A or
class B.

You can still find some good deals on class B's, you just have to look harder to find them.
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Old 06-12-2019, 02:27 AM   #4
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I think they went crazy high right as the recession ended because so few new were sold during the recession. They have stayed there ever since, and I haven't noticed a huge increase, but they are all very expensive for what they are, IMO.
Crazy indeed, having direct experience of converting my own from the passenger Sprinter I see no reason why it should be any more expensive than a truck/SUV ($50K) with a small RV trailer ($25K) with same functionalities and a like appliances. That is why for average family a trailer is a superior choice, vehicle for driving around and trailer for vacations.

For us $75K was the threshold to go with either a quality camper van fitting our needs or a small 13-16 trailer. We manage our DIY to be below the threshold excluding my time with top notch appliances and decent fit and finish.
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Old 06-13-2019, 12:07 PM   #5
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Absolutely new B-van prices are buoying used prices. I really have no idea why anyone would buy a $1200 a month 20 year mortgage for a new B-van, but apparently RV stores are selling them as fast as they can get them in.

For the REST of us whose income hovers in the "average" range, used B-vans are the only option. I just sold my '95 Coachmen with 67k miles on it (in significantly above-average condition) for $19k backed-up with two $20k offers if the first buyer fell through.

There are deals to be found but you have to be diligent, have cash, and be willing to travel halfway across the country on a moment's notice to get them. That's how I found my Interstate.
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Old 06-13-2019, 02:42 PM   #6
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When I purchased my used class b in Oct. '2017, I knew I was buying at the top of the market and paid too much. But it was about $10K cheaper than other similar ones I'd found so I considered it the price I had to pay in order to play.

Seems like the market has only gone up since then. Looking back after 1-1/2 years and all I can say is Rv'ing is rediculously extravagant, but we're so happy we bought it. We simply could not have done what we've done any other way and will never regret we did it while we had the health and means to enjoy it.

We may only travel a few more years and sell it. For now, however, we've got more trips to make.
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Old 06-17-2019, 05:21 AM   #7
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According to RVIA, shipments of class B RVs is down 41% year to date compared to 2018. https://www.rvia.org/news-insights/r...nts-april-2019
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Old 06-17-2019, 12:24 PM   #8
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According to RVIA, shipments of class B RVs is down 41% year to date compared to 2018. https://www.rvia.org/news-insights/r...nts-april-2019
Thanks for the link... Mark Twain is attributed with "There are three kinds of lies; lies, d@mned lies, and statistics."

Cherry picked by itself, this looks disastrous for Class B coaches. When you look at it in absolute terms, it's only 700 units that haven't shipped compared with last year... and there were only 1800 units shipped in 2018. My guess is that Roadtrek/Hymer alone could account for much of that.

When compared with "towables," it looks even worse as they're only down 23%, BUT in real numbers, that's actually some 28,000 units. I'd think that's more significant industry-wide than the 700 B-Van units.

Both Class A and Class B motorhomes are also down about 25%. In fact the entire industry appears to have shipped about 25% fewer RVs of all types so far this year. So, it would be interesting to know why demand is slowing for RVs of all types. Have we finally hit saturation? Is money tighter? Have the boomers bought all the RVs they want?

It would also be interesting to analyse the numbers by the dollar amount percentage of total industry profit generated by RV type. That isn't on the chart, but would be interesting to have broken out.
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Old 06-17-2019, 12:30 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by shadow View Post
A class B is more of a specialty item when it comes to rv"s, you are getting a whole lot of RV in
a small package, so that makes them more expensive to build as compared to a class A or
class B.

You can still find some good deals on class B's, you just have to look harder to find them.
I agree that they're more of a specialty item, but you're getting the exact same features and appliances you get in any other RV. Perhaps there's more expense in design in that engineers are constrained by the van structure, and that changes with each model year and adaptations have to be made. I think that the real issue with the expense is that they're using more and more expensive interior materials, and that as there are only a couple of thousand built industry-wide annually that the fixed costs of design and manufacture aren't spread across as many units sold. Finished vans are also more expensive to purchase for the upfitting than cutaway chassis are.
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:02 PM   #10
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The entire RV industry is down. That's true but Class Bs are down more. Agreed Hymer/Roadtrek might have some impact but there is no one picking up the slack. There might be an uptick in DIY vans but that doesn't help the RV industry. Boomers have another 10 years to run for full retirement and that is a rate of 10,000 per day and that is the biggest market for Class Bs and the so called young families and #vanlife millennials market are not making up that slack. The last recession the RV industry was the canary in the cage. Hopefully there will be no recession but clearly people are reordering their recreational priorities.

Families, noting my own kids, grandkids (anecdotal I know), don't have time for recreational camping to the point of investing in RV equipment. They are structured more around community based organized sports and other endeavors that didn't exist for baby boomers or even my kids. In Minnesota what is considered an adjunct to camping, fishing, is way down. Maybe they are discouraged by competition for camp sites as there are not as many per capita. Boomers are more and more seeking out boondocking opportunities like Walmart parking lots to Harvest Host especially in the summer months. The Feds are clamping down on BLM dispersed camping. Those are hardly family recreational desire.
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