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Old 03-29-2019, 03:25 PM   #21
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For me, keeping the interior at 55F everything works except the dump valves. I do have an inside fresh water tank. Even the water heater does not need to be on to stay above freezing. The furnace must work, of course.

I have taken a shower at 13F. Condensation was a bit of a problem but we didn't have to drive away. Interior was at 70 and water heater on.
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Old 03-29-2019, 03:41 PM   #22
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For me, keeping the interior at 55F everything works except the dump valves. I do have an inside fresh water tank. Even the water heater does not need to be on to stay above freezing. The furnace must work, of course.

I have taken a shower at 13F. Condensation was a bit of a problem but we didn't have to drive away.
Yes. Basically, there are two approaches to 4-season operation:
1) Indoor plumbing.
2) Outdoor heated plumbing.

#1 is easier, but it takes up precious space. Both are feasible. Straightforward trade off.
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Old 03-29-2019, 04:36 PM   #23
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I agree, but OP stipulated full use of water systems, a goal that I share.
Also my goal for next B-van. The closest I've seen so far is the latest short Sprinter by Advanced RV, known as "Bucky". Here is video with details.

https://youtu.be/zv7wyj9mBgA

I like this general layout, but would not want a composting toilet. As far as I know ARV is one of the few companies making an all-weather B-van.
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Old 03-29-2019, 06:14 PM   #24
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the only problem with some of these recomendations is Lithium batteries are the in thing.

Cold weather is problematic for Lithium. Extremley cold weather is very problematic.

If you are not plugged in lithium can be tough in the cold

I would highly recommend lithium if you live in a temperate to warm climate year round
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Old 03-29-2019, 06:36 PM   #25
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Those with lithium know how to work with them. They either have heaters or are inside. Lithium is best 'cause you can charge 'em up in 30 minutes in the morning and hit the slopes. Charge 'em again at the end of the day for the night furnace run. FLAs or AGMs take 4-6 hours to charge to 100%. Best to have an FLA bank large enough for the entire weekend. Charge it when you get home.
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Old 03-29-2019, 07:59 PM   #26
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the only problem with some of these recomendations is Lithium batteries are the in thing.

Cold weather is problematic for Lithium. Extremley cold weather is very problematic.

If you are not plugged in lithium can be tough in the cold

I would highly recommend lithium if you live in a temperate to warm climate year round
Gerry,

And your experience with lithiums is?

I've stated many times on here that cold weather hasn't been a problem and I am in one of the coldest climates and there are many people experiencing the same. I say that storing outside initially and with 4-1/3 experience. You just have to know how and there really isn't much of an absolute safe place unless you are in South Florida.

The next generation of lithium batteries I am contemplating (LiFeMgPo4) has the same absolute cold limit of -40 deg. F as with AGMs and quite frankly the batteries are not the only concern at that temperature. So if you desired to remain unplugged for storage over the winter you can do that too by disconnecting your batteries in place. Lithiums can survive natural loss of power better than AGMs. If you want in excess of 400ah of batteries in a van your choice should be lithium for efficiency, weight and space concerns.
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Old 03-29-2019, 08:39 PM   #27
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Bottom line is almost all class Bs can do a winter weekend with shore power. Most of them will require a major battery enhancement to keep the furnace going without outside power.
First thing I would do would be to swap to a non electric heater. Olympian wave has my vote. No lectric needed and doesn't need as much venting. Plus it's dry heat.
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Old 03-29-2019, 08:51 PM   #28
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First thing I would do would be to swap to a non electric heater. Olympian wave has my vote. No lectric needed and doesn't need as much venting. Plus it's dry heat.
Dry heat? Without much venting? Aren't the byproducts CO2 and H2O?
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Old 03-29-2019, 08:58 PM   #29
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Gerry,

And your experience with lithiums is?

I've stated many times on here that cold weather hasn't been a problem and I am in one of the coldest climates and there are many people experiencing the same. I say that storing outside initially and with 4-1/3 experience. You just have to know how and there really isn't much of an absolute safe place unless you are in South Florida.

The next generation of lithium batteries I am contemplating (LiFeMgPo4) has the same absolute cold limit of -40 deg. F as with AGMs and quite frankly the batteries are not the only concern at that temperature. So if you desired to remain unplugged for storage over the winter you can do that too by disconnecting your batteries in place. Lithiums can survive natural loss of power better than AGMs. If you want in excess of 400ah of batteries in a van your choice should be lithium for efficiency, weight and space concerns.
Hi, David.
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Old 03-29-2019, 09:16 PM   #30
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First thing I would do would be to swap to a non electric heater. Olympian wave has my vote. No lectric needed and doesn't need as much venting. Plus it's dry heat.
The only dry heat is furnace and electric. Condensation is a complaint with the Wave heaters. Radiant heat is a dry heat, true, but the catalytic process leaves behind H2O. There is a guy that makes a vented catalytic heater where the water, C02 and C0, if any, are vented outside.

http://www.ventedcatheater.com/heaters
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Old 03-29-2019, 10:44 PM   #31
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I should have clarified. It's dryer compared to a Mr buddy
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Old 03-31-2019, 05:30 AM   #32
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Also my goal for next B-van. As far as I know ARV is one of the few companies making an all-weather B-van.

Check out Winnebago Revel and Boldt.
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Old 03-31-2019, 07:10 PM   #33
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Check out Winnebago Revel and Boldt.
Oopps! You are correct those are both four-season capable. Their designs just don't fit my needs. I don't want or need 4x4 and I don't want another dually Sprinter.
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Old 03-31-2019, 07:31 PM   #34
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Time for Handyman to summarize his conclusions. Watcha gonna do stick with your truck?
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Old 04-04-2019, 05:02 PM   #35
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Hi!

My wife and I currently have a truck camper but want to try to switch to a Class B and I'm hoping you guys might be able to give us some advice. Were trying to figure out which model would best meet our needs. We are ski-bums and live in our camper at ski resort parking lots for most weekends during the winter. These are the things we must have:

-Ability to use full plumbing while boondocking down to 10 degrees F (I'm able to do some modifications myself to get it there if necessary)
-At least one child seat anchor
-A separate dinette and bed (we don't want to make/unmake the bed just to have somewhere to eat)

Can you think of anything that might work?

We had same questions and considered the Winnabago REVEL which is built on 4x4 Mercedes and has the water tank and all the plumbing inside and is good on most fronts, but we did not like the price $154K list selling at around $110-120, and cassette toilet. We ended up with a Carado Banff at $60K with tank inside, front wheel Promaster Van and most plumbing inside, that and elect heating tape and we were able to use at 10-20*. So far we like the Banff very much, but the REVEL is still on our future wish list.....
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Old 04-04-2019, 06:56 PM   #36
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The four-season capable now have lots more choices on single or dually on Ford Transit or Sprinter chassis, without the 4x4 option too, custom built! The Storyteller Overland Mode 4x4, http://www.summitadventurevans.com and AVR's is for the rich folk with unlimited budget, which I will never buy!
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Old 04-05-2019, 12:53 AM   #37
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If you will be boondocking at ski areas, then you will also be driving your class B in the snow. Not the same as driving a truck. There's a thread on this:
http://www.classbforum.com/forums/f5...do-6182-3.html
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Old 04-05-2019, 02:45 AM   #38
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I have a slide in, a class b, and a class A. I have found that slide ins are typically warmer than a class b.
I was in Chicago all winter and when they called for record lows I decided to turn off all heat in my class A and see what it took to do 2 weeks w just blankets all the way down to several days in a row at -20.
I was more comfortable in the pulldown bed over the front captains chairs in there at those temps than I was in my class b at +20 degrees, including when getting up to hit bathroom.
My class A has double pane windows and was constructed in western Canada, however.
That said, truckstops sell 12v mattress pads that work EXCEPTIONALLY WELL, also a 110 heating pad works but not near as well.
Using a 12v sleeping pad would allow you to set the thermostat WAYYYYY cooler and thereby run the 12v furnace fan less thereby saving battery power.
You could also get a buddy heater or a furnace with no fan(like often are in older slideins. They will easily heat a class b and then don't use any 12v power which means y'all can camp warm for as long as propane holds out and you can always add a rear hitch rack w a 100lb propane bottle and y'all could run for weeks.
Also it goes without saying that adding insulation, covering windows, and curtaining off unused sections helps a lot as well, especially on a class b which is all steel and glass which sucks heat out like crazy.
Also, the higher your bed is, the warmer you will be with less power being used AND THAT MAKES A BIGGER DIFFERENCE THAN YALL WOULD THINK.
The regular height bed vs my pull down ceiling bed in my class A is a HUGE difference in warmth.
Heat rises and it's less drafty with less air movement as you're in a small area of air trapped between the bed and ceiling.
So a fan less furnace and a 12v semi truck mattress pad is by far the easiest and cheapest way to go initially and in use. Good luck !!
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Old 04-05-2019, 04:28 AM   #39
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I have boondocked without problems in our 2006 Adventurous (Sprinter) down to low 20's. The water and waste tanks are positioned to get at least some heat from the cabin. We got it used and upgraded the cabin battery after a while. Furnace keeps,the unit quite comfortable and 12 gallons lasts a long time. We had not experienced hysteresis of the analog thermostat.
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Old 04-05-2019, 03:29 PM   #40
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We winter camp in our Roadtrek CS comfortably below 0F. Everything works fine except water systems. We carry water internally, use toilet with antifreeze and a 5 gallon bucket for grey water (dishes and washing). We have the diesel heat which puts out lots of BTUs and sips only tiny amount of fuel. Issue is energy, not heat. If you have 24/7 power, you can keep lines, tanks, interior heated. But, if power interrupted....could be very costly.
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