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Old 09-12-2018, 03:29 AM   #1
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Default Change all the fluids

I'm headed to houston in a couple of days to pick up my new (to me) 2015 Roadtrek 190P. Due to lack of service records, i've decided i'm going to change all the oils..Completely, filters, etc... any things that should have had regular maintenance... I've gotten fluid analysis, and nothing is awful, but some are not as clean as they s/b.

The RV will be living in North Florida, although we will be traveling much of the country.

Any specific fluid recommendations ? (I already have sea foam on the list)..
Any specific instructions to the dealer / shop to make sure nothing is missed ??? I'm one of those car owners who brings in their car and asks for "standard maintenance".. transmission, engine and generator.
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Old 09-12-2018, 05:10 AM   #2
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How many miles on it?

I'd recommend Mobil 1 synthetic and a Purolator oil filter for the engine and recommended fluid types for the rest of the vehicle.
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Old 09-12-2018, 06:25 AM   #3
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I've got an old 1997 PW. I just returned from Glacier and had the 60k service done. That was basically brake check, lube, tranny fluid and filter, rear end drain and refill. The other things on the list...plugs, oil change, oil filter, air cleaner element...I do myself.
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Old 09-12-2018, 12:13 PM   #4
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Take notes from the manual as to what fluid specs need to be met. When I was new to Class B's & had a fairly new unit I let a quick lube place drain the differential and it was Bobojay here on the forum that caught that they put in the wrong oil. The quick lube place paid for a GM dealer to drain & replace with the right oil but that extra trip & time wasted could have been avoided if I knew or had a list of what oil was required.

I've standardized on using Napa Gold oil filters on all my vehicles. Apparently they're made by Wix. They have a good reputation on forums etc.

Confirm how many grease points there are on your model year. There are 15 grease zerks on my '97. I think 2003's & newer have 11 zerks but hopefully folks with the newer Chevy vans will let us know how many grease points they've found.
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Old 09-12-2018, 12:48 PM   #5
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11 grease fittings on the Chevy. Have the steering linkage checked: Pitman and idler arm are weak points on these vans if not lubed regularly. Make sure an experienced person does the lube. I normally do my own work but on my 10,000 mile trip last summer I had a Grease Monkey quickee lube place do my oil change and chassis lube. When I got home I removed a front tire and noticed grease on top of the ball joint. I checked other fittings and the tech had not put the grease gun securely on the fitting and shot grease all over the outside of the fitting and not into the joint. Then when I changed the oil I found that the oil filter was loose.
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Old 09-12-2018, 02:08 PM   #6
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A couple of things to consider based on what we have found on our Chevy.


Brake fluid flush and change usind Dot 4 fluid for some higher temperature protection. I like Castrol brand of Dot 4 and have had good success over many years of use. Many people never change brake fluid, which is not a good idea.



Transmission fluid we use only "approved" Dexron VI fluid. Don't use the multipurpose fluids that claim they can be used for multiple applications, as they can have issues. We use Valvoline Dexron VI, which has worked well and is fairly reasonable in price compared to the Chevy fluid. Cheapest at Menards, of all places, around here.


If you have the trailer towing package, don't use any of the rear axle lubes that say they can be used in limited slip axles as they contain an additive for the limited slip part. The locking axle in the Chevies is a true locker and not a limited slip and is speced for non additive oil. The non additive oil is getting hard to find in some places. I like to use Redline 75W90NS oil but have to get it online or a high performance shop. The NS is the non additive part of the number. If it is a standard, non locking, axle, any good full synthetic like Amsoil is OK with or without the additive in it.



Engine oil is usually Redline synthetic for long interval trips and Mobil 1 otherwise, which I know is unusual, but I am doing a bit of a test. Redline is a group 5 synthetic which has tremendous heat tolerance and has full antiscuff additives like older oils, but has a sometimes claimed tendency to harden rubber seals (unproven problem at this point, though). Mobile 1 is a group IV or maybe group III, they won't tell you which, has less temp tolerance and you have to add antiscuff additives if you want them. Group III and IV oils are sometimes claimed to soften rubber seals too much so might balance out the Redline. Of course, the most likely answer is that neither have any rubber damage issues and the claims are competitive espionage from competition. Wix filters for all our vehicles, with an upsized one used on the van 6.0.


The next two are somewhat controversial so personal choice.


The power steering fluid also runs the Hydroboost brakes, so it gets a real workout. I found that the original fluid was quite discolored within 10K miles. Assuming that heat was a likely culprit, I read up on Hydroboost applications, and based on what the off road truck folks had to say (they severely stress Hydroboost systems), flushed the fluid and replaced it with Amsoil D4 synthetic automatic transmission fluid. The specs for viscosity and such are similar, but the D4 some better temp handling. At the same time I cut a "window" in the OEM rubber front spoiler, which is behind an opening in the Roadtrek plastic front bumper, to allow more air to the power steering fluid cooler which is behind it. My impression is that brake effort was reduced a bit and steering may have gotten a bit easier also. The D4 has been in for about 30K miles and still looks good.


For the coolant, I am not a fan of Dexcool, as they just have had too many issues with it, and I think there are less trouble prone options. They may or may not have all the issues fixed, but it is still very important that Dexcool not be allowed to get old or contaminated as it can get corrosive on things. The old "green stuff" is commonly used to replace Dexcool by lost of people, but it generally is considered to be shorter life and not as good in the engines that have much more aluminum than they used to in them. We finally settled in on using GO5 rated coolant, which is fairly common in many newer vehicles and readily available. Zerex brand is common around here, so that is what we got. No problems that I know of in either of the two GM vehicles we have, but without seeing the engine internals there is no way to tell if things are better or worse.


As always, remember if you stray from the GM recommended products, you do so at your own risk, but you can also, IMO, get better results and lower costs with non recommended products in some cases. Trans fluid is the exception for me on using factory spec rated products, as transmissions and fluids do need to work closely together to get the right clutch engagement feel and durability. Hondas do seem to be somewhat an exception as nearly all their fluids are somewhat special, so we stick to more of the factory fluids on DW's CRV.
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Old 09-12-2018, 02:21 PM   #7
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Wix filters for all our vehicles, with an upsized one used on the van 6.0.
What Wix model number are you using?
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Old 09-12-2018, 03:26 PM   #8
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What Wix model number are you using?

Wix number is 57045, and I think the NAPA gold number is the same and is the same filter.


The Wix website is nice as you can pull up the specs on the various filters to compare them. This filter appears to just be a longer version of the stubby that GM uses on the 6.0. The big thing is bypass opening pressure in most cases, and of course the thread and physical size including seal location.



You will often hear that the bigger filters are not needed as the small ones don't ever collect enough debris to actually not function right, and this is true, I think. For me, the bigger filter means more filter area, which means less pressure drop, which means the filter spends less time in bypass where it isn't filtering at all.
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Old 09-20-2018, 06:04 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by bwolfsohn View Post
I'm headed to houston in a couple of days to pick up my new (to me) 2015 Roadtrek 190P. Due to lack of service records, i've decided i'm going to change all the oils..Completely, filters, etc... any things that should have had regular maintenance... I've gotten fluid analysis, and nothing is awful, but some are not as clean as they s/b.

The RV will be living in North Florida, although we will be traveling much of the country.

Any specific fluid recommendations ? (I already have sea foam on the list)..
Any specific instructions to the dealer / shop to make sure nothing is missed ??? I'm one of those car owners who brings in their car and asks for "standard maintenance".. transmission, engine and generator.
Since I'm a GM guy & retiree, (and my name was mentioned earlier), I guess I better chime in here.
Since you didn't mention the mileage on the van let's go with more or less than 50k...
If less, I wouldn't worry about the differential, if more Amsoil Severe Gear 75w-140, if doing yourself, then run that for 100k miles

Transmission, I think I'd let a GM dealer do that at 50k (and the differential too while there). Be more $$, but you'd know you got the right fluids. Transmission every 50k (while there, have them do a brake check and fluid flush too)

For sure do an alignment either at a Chevy dealer or someone who can get that heavy vehicle, that you trust on their rack

Wix, NAPA, or AC filters only for engine and air (NAPAs are made by WIX)

Personally I don't like Mobil 1. I only use Amsoil Signature series in my vehicles, whatever weight the manufacturer calls for. My second choice is Pennzoil Ultra Platinum (notice I said ULTRA Platinum). Or if you have a dealer do the oil change, you can take your own in, and get it greased. Get the front end checked also like was said above. They will do that while doing an alignment.

Antifreeze, if the chassis is over 5yrs old, which it probably is right at that age, I'd change it. Have the dealer do that also if you take it to one to do any of the above, otherwise, myself, I'd stick with OEM fluid recommendation on that.

Power steering fluid? I'd change it out also with what was recommended above. Amsoil now makes a power steering specific fluid.

Remember your tires, if OEM, are getting real close to the max age limit, 5-7 years. Nothing to skimp on for sure.

Tire brand and oils are a couple of those subjects that have 1 thousand opinions in 1 thousand people. Use what you are happy & comfortable with is my say
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Old 09-20-2018, 06:30 PM   #10
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Nothing wrong with bobjay's recommendations, and as he says 100 people will have at least 100 opinions.


The one thing I would point out is that from what the local drivetrain shop told me (too late as it turns out) is that they have had trouble with Amsoil Severe Gear in the GM Govlock autolocking differentials. The Govlock is used in the van if you have the trailer towing package. They are an amsoil dealer, so not conflict of interest, I think. The big deal is with the limited slip additive in the Amsoil, as the Govlock is designed to run on conventional oil, and in the 75W90 weight.



I put in Severe Gear when I changed out our semi floating rear axle to the Govlock equipped full floater. No problems with noise or heat, but we did get one unintended partial lockup while doing a quick parking lot turn around loop. When I explained what happened to the driveline guys, they said they had seen it before and it went away when they took out the Severe Gear or other limited slip additive dosed oil and put in non additive oil at 75W90 weight. It is getting difficult to find the non additive oils, especially in synthetics, but there are still some around I think. I will be changing ours to Redline 75W90NS which is non additive gear oil. I don't know if the GM oil has additive or not, just that it is crazy expensive.



The normal, open, differential can use oil with or without additive, so the Severe Gear would work in them without issue.
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Old 09-20-2018, 09:01 PM   #11
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Always a good practice.
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Old 09-20-2018, 10:23 PM   #12
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Default Change them all

We purchased a 2007 Roadtrek (6.0 liter gas) with only 21000 miles on the clock. The first thing I did was take it to a Chevrolet dealer and change all the fluids. The oil, transmission fluid, brake fluid, radiator fluid, differential fluids, etc. We use synthetic oil, and have not had a single issue and, surprisingly, our Chevrolet dealer treats us very fairly. It gives you a base line to work from and you know you have taken care of any "deferred" maintenance. Also service the generator and run it often under load !!!
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Old 09-20-2018, 11:03 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by bwolfsohn View Post
I'm headed to houston in a couple of days to pick up my new (to me) 2015 Roadtrek 190P. Due to lack of service records, i've decided i'm going to change all the oils..Completely, filters, etc... any things that should have had regular maintenance... I've gotten fluid analysis, and nothing is awful, but some are not as clean as they s/b.

The RV will be living in North Florida, although we will be traveling much of the country.

Any specific fluid recommendations ? (I already have sea foam on the list)..
Any specific instructions to the dealer / shop to make sure nothing is missed ??? I'm one of those car owners who brings in their car and asks for "standard maintenance".. transmission, engine and generator.
Congratulations! Your Chevy Express chasis is new enough there is little you have to do right now but change oil and air filter. Generator is another matter. I'd change oil in it right now and at recommended intervals (150 hours or annually, I believe).

Camp a night in your driveway or make a short local shake down trip to familiarize with systems and ensure everything works as intended. Let us know how you enjoy your first trip!
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Old 09-21-2018, 01:15 AM   #14
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Booster, a couple of questions.
I have changed out the power steering fluid a couple of times in our 2007 Roadtrek 210. All I did was suck out the fluid from the reservoir, fill it, and then with the engine running turn the wheels fully right and left a few time, shut it down, and repeat the above 2 or 3 more times. I really don't know how good of a flush through the lines I am getting. I thought about removing the return line to drain fluid into something, but I was uncertain which line to use. How do you change out this fluid?

I have been using DexCool every coolant change. Thought about going to another coolant, but was afraid to do it as I did not want to cause a problem.
Is the coolant you went to compatible with DexCool, making it unnecessary to take any special steps when making the change?
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Old 09-21-2018, 01:48 AM   #15
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Booster, a couple of questions.
I have changed out the power steering fluid a couple of times in our 2007 Roadtrek 210. All I did was suck out the fluid from the reservoir, fill it, and then with the engine running turn the wheels fully right and left a few time, shut it down, and repeat the above 2 or 3 more times. I really don't know how good of a flush through the lines I am getting. I thought about removing the return line to drain fluid into something, but I was uncertain which line to use. How do you change out this fluid?

I have been using DexCool every coolant change. Thought about going to another coolant, but was afraid to do it as I did not want to cause a problem.
Is the coolant you went to compatible with DexCool, making it unnecessary to take any special steps when making the change?

Very good questions.


Just changing the fluid in the reservoir is not really very effective as it is such small amount, and each time in a row you change it you get less of the dirty and more of the just changed, as they mix. The van is actually a fairly easy one to flush completely, which is good because it holds quite a bit of fluid because of the hydroboost going to the steering gear, brake module and the cooler. The reservoir has two lines to it, so you take off the return line, which is non pressurized, and is the one highest on the reservoir. The outlet line is on the bottom. Put plug on the return line connection of the reservoir to keep it from leaking and put a long hose onto the return line itself so you can get it to a container. Start the engine and add fluid as the level goes down in the reservoir as a helper slowly turns the steering back and forth. It helps if you have the wheels off the ground, but isn't absolutely necessary. Applying the brakes a couple of times to run the hydroboost may get a little more out. Just keep doing the bleed and add until the oil is coming out of the return line clean. As long as it doesn't ever run dry on you, there will be no air allowed in so no issues with that. It usually takes me between 1 and two quarts of fluid. Hook the line back up and top off and you are done.


I think if switching from Dexcool was much of a problem, there would be dead GM products all over the place, as lots of them have been switched to various other antifreeze types. Many use the green stuff, and quite a few the GO5 like we did, and others may use other long drain interval types. If you Google the topic, you will have enough reading for lifetime, I think.


As for doing a partial drain and getting mixed brands/styles, I am not a fan of doing that. Dexcool has a bit of reputation of not playing well with other kinds, and I am a born skeptic of anything like "universal" antifreeze that they claim is compatible with everything, like many of the parts store antifreeze does. Doing a complete change at home is a pretty messy job, to be sure, and it will 2 to 3 fill and dump cycles to get the old out for the most part. We are on septic, so I had to catch all of it, including the flushing water and take it to recycling and it totaled about 10 gallons.


To do the flush completely, you need to remove the lower radiator hose to drain the radiator and pull the block plug by the oil filter with a very big metric allen wrench. It is best to also pull the thermostat while doing the flush, but if you are open on both sides as mentioned, it also works leaving it in. The thermostat is in an odd spot as it mounts to the block at the lower radiator hose, not the upper hose.


You would likely want to download the refill procedure as the Chevies are prone to airlocking at refill. Short form is you fill into the upper radiator hose with the airbleed hose (small one the connects to the radiator just below the cap open and held at the same level as the upper radiator hose. It takes a while to get the radiator full as it has to leak around the thermostat. You can add some to the radiator during the process once you get antifreeze coming out the bleed hose when you lower it.


If you have a shop you can trust to do a good flush, it is likely worth the cost, so they can deal with the mess instead of you.
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Old 09-21-2018, 12:12 PM   #16
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Excellent answers. Thanks Booster.
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Old 09-18-2019, 10:21 PM   #17
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A few minutes ago I wrote about changing out the power steering fluid, but the forum does not have it that I can see. Here is another version.

Thanks to all of you above that provided much needed information on how to change out the power steering fluid in our 07C210P Roadtrek. Did it today in about 1 hour.

Prep: Raise front wheels, suck old fluid out of reservoir, remove reservoir inlet line (rubber line from Hydro Boost, connect 3/8" tubing to line from Hydro Boost and run it to pan on ground, plug reservoir inlet port, and refill reservoir with fluid.

Hoped fluid would flow out with engine off and just turning steering wheel to extreme right and left, as well as pumping brake pedal. Nothing flowed. Started the engine.

None to a small amount would flow just idling. turning wheel to extreme ends did best when holding wheel at extremes. Brake pedal push/release did give a noticeable flow, but not continuous.

After a few wheel turns and pedal pushes, I left the engine idling and refilled the reservoir. Repeated this maybe 10 times. Fluid started out dark brown and ended up a light yellowish color. Used 4 qts of fluid.

I don't think any air was sucked into the pump, but if it was, what symptoms would I notice? I read online that there is a bleed valve (some where) on the steering box.
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Old 09-18-2019, 10:40 PM   #18
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A few minutes ago I wrote about changing out the power steering fluid, but the forum does not have it that I can see. Here is another version.

Thanks to all of you above that provided much needed information on how to change out the power steering fluid in our 07C210P Roadtrek. Did it today in about 1 hour.

Prep: Raise front wheels, suck old fluid out of reservoir, remove reservoir inlet line (rubber line from Hydro Boost, connect 3/8" tubing to line from Hydro Boost and run it to pan on ground, plug reservoir inlet port, and refill reservoir with fluid.

Hoped fluid would flow out with engine off and just turning steering wheel to extreme right and left, as well as pumping brake pedal. Nothing flowed. Started the engine.

None to a small amount would flow just idling. turning wheel to extreme ends did best when holding wheel at extremes. Brake pedal push/release did give a noticeable flow, but not continuous.

After a few wheel turns and pedal pushes, I left the engine idling and refilled the reservoir. Repeated this maybe 10 times. Fluid started out dark brown and ended up a light yellowish color. Used 4 qts of fluid.

I don't think any air was sucked into the pump, but if it was, what symptoms would I notice? I read online that there is a bleed valve (some where) on the steering box.

Glad it worked out for you OK. Can't say on the bleed valve, as this is the first time I have heard that, but I will look in our factory service manual to see what it says. If you had air, you would normally hear it in the pump or feel notchy steering or long/hard brake travel. Watch the reservoir for a few days to see if it goes down at all.


What did you decide to use for power steering fluid. We have switched to synthetic Dexron IV transmission fluid and it seems to be a bit better better, especially on braking force. Any synthetic is likely to be better than Dino as the system runs quite hot.



If you are in to tweaking at all, you might want to take a look at the front ground effects and the rubber chin spoiler (factory) which is right behind the ground effects. They basically block airflow to the power steering cooler. I cut a section out of the rubber spoiler to let the air through and the power steering runs noticeably cooler and doesn't darken over time like it used to do.
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Old 09-20-2019, 12:47 PM   #19
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I will monitor the P/S reservoir level. I used regular Prestone P/S fluid for this first thorough flush. Now that I know how to do it, will probably use a synthetic next time.

I removed the front ground effects a couple of years ago, which might help air flow to the cooler. Will take a look at the spoiler. However it is now very visible, so cutting out a section probably won't look good. Is there any harm is just totally removing the spoiler?
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Old 09-20-2019, 06:13 PM   #20
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I will monitor the P/S reservoir level. I used regular Prestone P/S fluid for this first thorough flush. Now that I know how to do it, will probably use a synthetic next time.

I removed the front ground effects a couple of years ago, which might help air flow to the cooler. Will take a look at the spoiler. However it is now very visible, so cutting out a section probably won't look good. Is there any harm is just totally removing the spoiler?

I doubt removing the spoiler would hurt anything as the van isn't exactly aerodynamic anyway. Can't say what it would look like, though.
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