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Old 06-20-2018, 06:00 PM   #11
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I have a Class B Okanagan Tribute (Not sure if it's available in the states) but it's great for travelling - including boondocking. I also bought a flip-up cargo carrier for extras. It saves having to tow anything. It has two extra seatbelts, although they're not front facing. The nice thing is though, that it's all windows with the 3 piece bath at the back. Also, it's not as pricey as the Roadtreks or Winnebago.
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Old 06-21-2018, 04:05 AM   #12
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I have towed a Honda Fit with both a Sprinter and a Class C Winnebago. I do not think it that hard but you must be careful in turning. Getting in and out of some gas stations may be difficult. I no longer tow, but have thought about a small teardrop trailer, for when I take my daughter camping. I do not think that a small trailer is a bad idea, but have you thought about using a tent when camping (along with the class B). If you plan on using your class B as an about town vehicle, I would suggest not going bigger than around 19 f t. Just my to cents.

Hal DeVera
2015 CS etrek
Davis, CA
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Old 06-21-2018, 04:37 AM   #13
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.

This might help you make up your mind about towing

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Old 06-21-2018, 11:15 AM   #14
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Getting diesel turned out to be the biggest issue when we towed the 20' or so Travel Trailer behind our B van. I often had to end up at truck refueling stations. Those didn't have pay at the pump and the ground was always oily around the pumps. The large diameter pump nozzles allowed too high of a volume of fuel to flow so I had to carefully dispense the fuel.

IIRC, the van / trailer combo got around 12MPG which I thought was good. It did cut down the range though so I had to fuel up every day on long trips. Handling was never an issue and I never even needed to attach the sway control bar.

I think a lot of folks don't realize that typical Travel Trailer tires are only rated for 65 MPH. Going slow helps the fuel economy and handling. It's also relaxing so I didn't get as tired behind the wheel compared to driving at higher speeds all day.

The Class A I have averages 7 MPG when towing an SUV. That combo is also speed limited to 65 MPH or less specified by the flat towing instructions in the SUV owner manual. Range is better with the Class A/SUV combo compared to the B Van/Trailer Combo.

On extended trips consisting of several months I think overall fuel costs end up very similar if comparing the two very different combination of vehicles/rigs provided that the Class A is parked on an RV site the vast majority of the time. For example: the Class A might only be driven for 10 days in total during a 6 month long trip. The touring around fuel expense is incurred with the much more fuel efficient car or SUV.
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Old 06-21-2018, 12:53 PM   #15
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Our Roadtrek has a 7500 pound hitch with a 1000 pound tongue weight rating. With that capacity we could tow a nice little travel trailer. I wouldn't consider towing anything for one simple reason: that is why we have a B so we do NOT have to tow.

We also have a wonderful Phoenix Cruiser that is just under 24 feet long and we tow a Jeep Cherokee Trailhawk behind it for extended trips. Towing, in my view is and will always be to me a pain. Ours tows flawlessly and is no problem whatsoever going straight down the road, but finding a gas station where you can swing out far enough to get to the pump can be a real problem.

Pulling a trailer is more simple than towing a car for one good reason: you can back up a trailer (hopefully ) but you can't back up a towed vehicle or you will certainly bend your tow bar.
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Old 06-21-2018, 02:57 PM   #16
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Think twice before Travato..beautiful, but engine so-so..I went with Pleasure Way..more pick up power..
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Old 06-21-2018, 03:31 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NFRicaS View Post
Think twice before Travato..beautiful, but engine so-so..I went with Pleasure Way..more pick up power..
Which Pleasureway?

Ford?
Sprinter?
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Old 06-21-2018, 05:23 PM   #18
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Wonder Why More People Don't Do This
Seems like the OP is on to something. You get the flexibility of a 2bdr + 2 bath + 2 kitchen RV in 35ft. under $170K (watch the payload /towing limits).

You can not use the trailer when you don't need it (20mpg + daily driver) but include it for 2 couples wanting to travel together but desire privacy for sleeping / bath.

The Ultimate Mobile Office (Home + Office/Studio)

19ft Short Sprinter


16ft Lightweight Trailer
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Old 06-21-2018, 06:17 PM   #19
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I had a Casita for years and years.
It was great - *very* light (even though I had a brake controller in my tow vehicle), easy to operate (since everything was manual, there was nothing to break.
In CA it was a "perm trailer" - so no recurring costs.
It had fantastic insulation, a great shower/toilet, fiberglass (no rust or mold), and almost 0 maintenance.
Most importantly, it was cheap - $22K including tax and license - but picked up from TX.
Most importantly, if you visited a national park, you could simply drop the trailer off and take the truck to do all the "mountain goat" activities you could conjure up.

But I traded up to a Travato 59K. Why?
a) Parking the truck and the trailer on the Pacific Coast Highway (CA 1) at a picturesque spot was virtually impossible. In fact, if you don't have experience with backing up a trailer, getting into a spot at a CA State Park is looks impossible too! Backing up is a2 person job for sure - at least in my opinion
b) I have an inclined driveway, and there was "just enough" room to park without blocking the garage. Positioning the trailer with only 2 inches to spare on either side was impossible without a dolly
c) Hitching and unhitching on an inclined driveway isn't easy, and I once experienced a "false hitch"
d) In CA at least, you cannot do more than 55 mph while towing

So, it was a matter of convenience and luxury vs. cost.
I hope that helped
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Old 06-21-2018, 06:18 PM   #20
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BTW - the Casita looks exactly like the Airstream Nest,and is a *lot* cheaper.
Maybe they are modeled after each otehr?
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