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Old 07-04-2015, 01:53 AM   #1
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Default Class B in Victoria BC

I currently live in central Alberta, so the need to winterize is a no-brainer, as my Roadtrek is stored outside. Hoping to find out from anyone living in Victoria BC or somewhere with similar mild winters - do you still find it necessary to winterize?

Thanks!
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Old 07-04-2015, 12:25 PM   #2
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I winterized the RV when I lived there.

There's some discussion / advice out there to not use air to blow water out of the lines on a Roadtrek.

I only put pink stuff in the traps and toilet this past winter. I drained the fresh water tank and water heater etc. and used air to blow out plumbing lines, faucet, shower head, toilet supply and it made it through a very cold winter here in NB. I wanted to keep it in a trip ready state.
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Old 07-04-2015, 12:57 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by apples4t View Post
I currently live in central Alberta, so the need to winterize is a no-brainer, as my Roadtrek is stored outside. Hoping to find out from anyone living in Victoria BC or somewhere with similar mild winters - do you still find it necessary to winterize?

Thanks!
We are at almost exactly the same latitude as you, and about 50 miles east here in Skagit county, WA.
We normally winterize. Temps can get down into the teens (F) on rare occasions, mid to upper 20's are common.
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Old 07-04-2015, 02:00 PM   #4
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Remember, the anomalous dramatic expansion of water happens at the point of the liquid-to-solid phase change: i.e., at 32 degrees. If you keep cooling it after that, the ice actually contracts a bit, just like more typical solids. So, the real danger point for your plumbing is around freezing--it doesn't get worse the colder you get. Of course, you also have to STAY cold long enough for the residual heat to leak out of your rig and the pipes to get as cold as the air.
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Old 07-04-2015, 02:13 PM   #5
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Quite true. But the expansion happens at 2 times...when the water freezes, and again when it starts to melt. So even if nothing bursts upon freezing, damage can occur upon defrosting.
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Old 07-04-2015, 02:52 PM   #6
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Also correct. But my point is that living in the Yukon is not particularly worse than living in a place with frequent freeze/thaw cycles (unless the freeze-periods are very short). Indeed, for the reason you mention, long, continuous winters are probably LESS dangerous.
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Old 07-04-2015, 03:09 PM   #7
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Also correct. But my point is that living in the Yukon is not particularly worse than living in a place with frequent freeze/thaw cycles (unless the freeze-periods are very short). Indeed, for the reason you mention, long, continuous winters are probably LESS dangerous.
Agree. Which is why I mentioned that mid-upper 20s are common around here.

Or maybe, the way this past year went, were common around here.

Stan
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Old 07-04-2015, 04:26 PM   #8
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We live i Parksville, just up the road from Victoria & we always winterize. It's not much, but we do get freezing temps around here (that sometimes last 2 weeks) & it only takes one time to do the damage. So, unless you find inside storage, i'd say that you should winterize.
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Old 07-05-2015, 05:55 AM   #9
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Thanks for all the info!
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