Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-24-2018, 07:29 AM   #1
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: CA
Posts: 1,139
Default Counter question to selling your RV at 9 years....

So... you've decided to keep your RV for the long term and run until the wheels fall off....

When is it time to sell for safety considerations??????

Or ... just keep driving and repairing it forever?????????

What do you think????
__________________

Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2018, 10:36 AM   #2
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Virginia
Posts: 681
Angry

I would think if it were me, I would keep it for the following reasons:

You know the vehicle, you have lived in it, altered it to you and your wife's likes. Most probably the Coach items were replaced by you, so you know they are quality compared to that being offered at the current time, and installed properly.

If your concerned about the tranny, etc., pay the money to have it checked by a Pro - that cost is most probably less than some people make in a payment for their RV's. I don't know the life expectancy of a Diesel, and the Gasser are heading way up in mileage.

You read the complaints, rants, etc of disgruntled customers - you sure don't want to have to be subjected to that. If you have an old and very reliable Independent RV Dealer who you have done business with and are currently known to them......you will probably get a machine that is ready to go. So many are being put out, and in my impression it is akin to the Software Market, throw it out and let the customer find the errors.

Yours is paid for, running well, and I don't believe your hedging your be; it is paid for and if, in the future you need to get some work done....that is chump change compared to buying a new vehicle and its headaches.

Just my two cents worth, Ron
__________________

__________________
Ron J. Moore
'15 RT210P
Ron J. Moore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2018, 11:44 AM   #3
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: New Hamshire
Posts: 53
Default

RV financing becomes difficult to get on an over 10 year old vehicle. This limits your potential buyer market.
Rockwood27 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2018, 03:27 PM   #4
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: CA
Posts: 1,139
Default I know.. that concerns me...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockwood27 View Post
RV financing becomes difficult to get on an over 10 year old vehicle. This limits your potential buyer market.
Maybe this is why deprecation on 11 to 15 years old vehicles seems to increase more quickly than years 5 to 10......?

By the time it's 15 plus years old you really are relegated to "people willing to pay cash"....
If your vehicle is not in pristine condition....then it makes it harder to sell and people just want a bargain basement ......

How old is your vehicle and what's your normal turn around time??

You're kind of dammed if you do or dammed if you keep it.......

I'm thinking that if I keep it past 10 years...I might as well keep it for 20..or more..... heck, might as well give it to a family member later???
Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2018, 03:31 PM   #5
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: CA
Posts: 1,139
Default You made some good points.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron J. Moore View Post
I would think if it were me, I would keep it for the following reasons:

You know the vehicle, you have lived in it, altered it to you and your wife's likes. Most probably the Coach items were replaced by you, so you know they are quality compared to that being offered at the current time, and installed properly.

If your concerned about the tranny, etc., pay the money to have it checked by a Pro - that cost is most probably less than some people make in a payment for their RV's. I don't know the life expectancy of a Diesel, and the Gasser are heading way up in mileage.

You read the complaints, rants, etc of disgruntled customers - you sure don't want to have to be subjected to that. If you have an old and very reliable Independent RV Dealer who you have done business with and are currently known to them......you will probably get a machine that is ready to go. So many are being put out, and in my impression it is akin to the Software Market, throw it out and let the customer find the errors.

Yours is paid for, running well, and I don't believe your hedging your be; it is paid for and if, in the future you need to get some work done....that is chump change compared to buying a new vehicle and its headaches.

Just my two cents worth, Ron
I understand..I keep my vehicles in EXCELLENT CONDITION...and you're right in saying that I know what I've done.....

So true that replacement is the most expensive way to go....

On the other hand... trying to sell something past 10 years old without the ability to finance it does have limitations.... smaller market of buyers....etc...
Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2018, 04:13 PM   #6
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 240
Default

I posted this about a year ago:

Default 2007 RT back in the nest
In September 2006 we brought home our new 2007 Roadtrek 210 Popular. We had ordered it as a gift to ourselves for our 30th wedding anniversary. We equipped it as we wanted for our type travel and use. Previously, we had owned a 190 RT and an Intervec Horizon Class B. So, we were no strangers to B World and had owned a couple of Cs over the years.

In September 2013 we purchased an eleven month old Phoenix Cruiser with 7500 miles on it which came up for sale less than four miles from our home. We wanted to do some more extended camping in one spot and have a little more "house" to do that in the RT could provide for weeks at a time.

We kept both RVs until March 2014 at which time we took our RT down to Houston and PPL consignment sellers. It was purchased quickly and at a fair price by a lady who just happened to be the president of PPL! She called and fully disclosed her interest and her position and asked if I would have a problem with her buying it and did I consider that a conflict. No, I did not but I appreciated her forthrightness and disclosure. I found PPL to be very professional and a nice outfit with which to do business.

Well, we have enjoyed the heck out of our Phoenix Cruiser and used it for almost four years now for extended periods of dry camping. I consider PC to be a really top of the drawer Class C custom manufacturer. That being said, we never ceased to miss our old Roadtrek. We have to store the Phoenix a few miles from our home. Our home has an HVAC third garage with a door nine feet tall which we had built originally for the RT 190. It was great to walk out of the house directly into the garage and have the RT190 there for years and then the 210P there for many more years. Simply put, we love our Phoenix Cruiser and missed the heck out of our Roadtrek at the same time!

Well, guess what? The Roadtrek showed up one day on the PPL website for sale and I called Diana at PPL and asked her if she was selling our child!! Yes she was. We made a deal on the phone in about ten minutes. She had taken the same meticulous care of our child since that we did for almost seven years and she had enjoyed it and was glad to see it go home to the original mom and dad who she knew would care for it in the future.

Diana is lovely lady and has been at PPL for decades. She and I laughed because she could never recall someone buying back their old rig like we were doing. Well, we picked up the Roadtrek last Thursday and Diana had taken incredible care of it in the years she owned it and had not put a lot of miles on it. We will always be grateful to her for kindness and friendship and the care she took of our 30th wedding present!

Now, we have two RVs! Our RT is in the garage and is immaculate. It looks no different than when we picked it up at the dealer eleven years ago. We also have our beautiful Phoenix Cruiser and we will continue to use it for its large tanks, spaciousness and reliability, particularly in our extended dry camping which goes on for weeks at a time.

It seems excessive to have two rigs, but researching a lot of forums I find that it is not as unusual as it seems at first blush. And when you are getting a little older, you might as well enjoy yourself and your retirement.

We plan on touring more with the RT and camping more with the PC as long as we can and hope that will be many years to come.

Thus endeth the saga of the return of the baby to the nest!!


We looked at new Bs and simply concluded that we had rather have our old one back and were lucky to have the opportunity to reacquire it. Given the fact that our 2007 was the last production year before the troubles of 2008 came along and given the fact that we had specked out our 2007 for our needs and not just accepted someone elses, we are happy little campers.

We own a wonderful C and a marvelous B for a total financial consideration of about what a new well equipped 210P would cost and for far less than a significant number of other Bs now cost. Plus, we know our B very well mechanically and are fully prepared to spend a few grand as need be on repairs.

How long will we keep it? I have not clue one. It could be five years or it could be ten years. One thing I do know is it will not be based on any anticipated values that are truly unknown in the future.

Today, twelve years and a month after our original purchase of the RT, it has a true market value of about sixty percent of our original cost all those years ago. My Jeep Grand Cherokee loaded with a Hemi and virtually every option available when I bought it in 2011 is worth about forty percent of my original purchase cost.

Now, you don't need to be much of an expert in finance to grasp those cost/market/years relationships do you? Who wuda thunk it?

Paul
Doneworking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2018, 04:24 PM   #7
Bud
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: LA
Posts: 840
Default

There are multiple vehicles with a million plus miles out there.

B's can be like a 60 year old B52, maintained and updated. In fact you can spend thousands every year maintaining and updating vs buying a new B every 9 years. This assumes average years, not cherry picking a specific 9 year period.

Bud
Bud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2018, 04:31 PM   #8
Site Team
 
avanti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 3,271
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 View Post
Maybe this is why deprecation on 11 to 15 years old vehicles seems to increase more quickly than years 5 to 10......?
Any data? This seems kind of unlikely.

I know of no reliable data source for RV depreciation, so maybe they are special in some way, but virtually all depreciation curves (corrected for historical variable such as recessions) end up being nearly perfect exponential decay functions, with an asymptote at scrap value of the product. For example, here is what automotive depreciation looks like:



This image is from Wikipedia, but the shape of the curve is always the same. Note that it is almost completely smooth. There are no "sweet spots". The bloggers who claim to identify such sweet spots are failing to account for historical externalities such as changes in the economy, the introduction of new models, and many others. If we are just talking about actual depreciation, I have never seen a reliable dataset that did not describe a simple exponential decay.

P.S. -- I am not trying to pick on you, either on this topic or any other. It is just that the value of lists like this lies in sorting the wheat from the chaff, and facts matter more than opinions.
__________________
Formerly: 2005 Airstream Interstate (Sprinter 2500 T1N)
Now!: 2014 Great West Vans Legend SE (Sprinter 3500 NCV3 I4)
avanti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2018, 04:39 PM   #9
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 7,581
Default

What I think is missing from this discussion, unless I missed it, is the cost vs cost assessment periodically.


While there is no doubt a lot of us could keep a class b running for a ridiculously long time, that doesn't mean it would be wise financial decision the entire time, and financial consequences seem to be what is being discussed.


At some point in the life of the vehicle, the repair, upgrades, etc are going to get to a point where they are equal to the payments on something that requires less cost to maintain. At that point you would need to decide what to do. For those that do their own repairs and updates, the time for replacement would certainly be delayed due to lower costs of maintaining the van, but for those who hire everything done, the time to switch might come surprisingly soon, especially if you have a high repair cost van like a Sprinter.


Everybody will have their own balance sheet requirements for all of this, but it is very, very, easy to dump good money on top of bad, as they say, with keeping older vehicles running.


I am certainly not against keeping vehicles a long time, or even buying older vehicles, as that is what I drive for a car, a 22 year old Buick Roadmaster wagon that I got 5 years ago when I retired.
booster is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2018, 04:43 PM   #10
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 7,581
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by avanti View Post
Any data? This seems kind of unlikely.

I know of no reliable data source for RV depreciation, so maybe they are special in some way, but virtually all depreciation curves (corrected for historical variable such as recessions) end up being nearly perfect exponential decay functions, with an asymptote at scrap value of the product. For example, here is what automotive depreciation looks like:



This image is from Wikipedia, but the shape of the curve is always the same. Note that it is almost completely smooth. There are no "sweet spots". The bloggers who claim to identify such sweet spots are failing to account for historical externalities such as changes in the economy, the introduction of new models, and many others. If we are just talking about actual depreciation, I have never seen a reliable dataset that did not describe a simple exponential decay.

P.S. -- I am not trying to pick on you, either on this topic or any other. It is just that the value of lists like this lies in sorting the wheat from the chaff, and facts matter more than opinions.
\


Re the "sweet spots"-- Those spots can be there, but usually are based on certain vehicle weaknesses, such as Subaru head gaskets or some of the diesel pickup injector, pumps, head gasket type issues that happen the pretty consistently at some mileage or age. Of course, only those buyers who are knowledgeable enough to know of the issues understand the sweet spot or in this case anti-sweet spot.
__________________

booster is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT. The time now is 11:29 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.