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Old 08-09-2018, 08:48 PM   #21
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Are any of these built on a cut-away-chassis, like the one in the photo that I linked to?



Are they still called B+ despite the small size?

Size is not the determinant.

Class B = built from a panel van

Class C = built from a cut away chassis


These narrow Class C are trying to catch on. There were quite a few at last year's Hershey show. You'd never know, it might be a hit.
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Old 08-09-2018, 10:23 PM   #22
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One of the big factors in buying a B not C for me is the all Mercedes engineered steel van body that has believable structural integrity. Almost learned this the hard way when we blew an inside rear tire on a class C in about 1990. Went back to the RV side to see clear through to the ground where the tire tread blew through the 1/4 plywood wheel well built by the RV company. Very unsafe construction.

But we also love the mobility and been able to compromise on the size with 2 adults and one dog. Not for everybody, but it works for us.
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Old 08-10-2018, 06:27 AM   #23
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One of the big factors in buying a B not C for me is the all Mercedes engineered steel van body that has believable structural integrity. Almost learned this the hard way when we blew an inside rear tire on a class C in about 1990. Went back to the RV side to see clear through to the ground where the tire tread blew through the 1/4 plywood wheel well built by the RV company. Very unsafe construction.

But we also love the mobility and been able to compromise on the size with 2 adults and one dog. Not for everybody, but it works for us.

This sentence says it right here...


One of the big factors in buying a B not C for me is the all Mercedes engineered steel van body that has believable structural integrity.
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Old 08-10-2018, 05:25 PM   #24
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European makers have a number of those narrow class "C"s. Even Airstream is charging nearly a quarter of a million dollars for one. It would be interesting to see those not just in the "Cadillac" market, but in the "Chevy" market as well. However, unless they "C"s have a fiberglass or automotive-grade, one piece metal roof, I wouldn't bother buying one, because the rubber roofs are always a loose twig away from leaking.

I have seen one custom class "C" handle the tire blowout by using Line-X on the wheel well. However, I agree with you 100% about safety. If I see a class "C" in a wreck, oftentimes the whole body of the vehicle is off the chassis. Class "A"s as well, unless you buy one that originally came as a bus and built to automotive tolerances.

If I wind up in a rollover in a "B", I know what will happen, because the "B" chassis has been in crash tests, and I can pick up the video via YouTube. A class "C" may completely collapse, similar with an "A". Even "C"s with fiberglass roofs may not be strong enough to handle the weight of the vehicle if it is upside down.

tl;dr, class "B"s are the best around for safety, barring some of the high end Prevost or Newell diesel pushers.
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Old 08-10-2018, 06:42 PM   #25
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European makers have a number of those narrow class "C"s. Even Airstream is charging nearly a quarter of a million dollars for one. It would be interesting to see those not just in the "Cadillac" market, but in the "Chevy" market as well. However, unless they "C"s have a fiberglass or automotive-grade, one piece metal roof, I wouldn't bother buying one, because the rubber roofs are always a loose twig away from leaking.

I have seen one custom class "C" handle the tire blowout by using Line-X on the wheel well. However, I agree with you 100% about safety. If I see a class "C" in a wreck, oftentimes the whole body of the vehicle is off the chassis. Class "A"s as well, unless you buy one that originally came as a bus and built to automotive tolerances.

If I wind up in a rollover in a "B", I know what will happen, because the "B" chassis has been in crash tests, and I can pick up the video via YouTube. A class "C" may completely collapse, similar with an "A". Even "C"s with fiberglass roofs may not be strong enough to handle the weight of the vehicle if it is upside down.

tl;dr, class "B"s are the best around for safety, barring some of the high end Prevost or Newell diesel pushers.
class "B"s are the best around for safety, barring some of the high end Prevost or Newell diesel pushers.
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Old 08-10-2018, 06:47 PM   #26
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I think that everyone has to realize that in a hard crash or especially a rollover, it isn't the structure that is going to get you in most cases. It will be the flying debris inside the body that causes you the bodily harm. I would guess that none of the interior, heavy, parts would pass any kind of impact testing without breaking loose, and none of the stuff inside them is ever locked down.
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Old 08-10-2018, 07:40 PM   #27
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I think that everyone has to realize that in a hard crash or especially a rollover, it isn't the structure that is going to get you in most cases. It will be the flying debris inside the body that causes you the bodily harm. I would guess that none of the interior, heavy, parts would pass any kind of impact testing without breaking loose, and none of the stuff inside them is ever locked down.
I think Roadtrek crash tests their models to make sure that everything they have added doesn't wind up in the driver's/passenger's lap. You are right about the debris. There are some interesting/horrific crash test videos of class "C"s on YouTube worth looking at.

Of course, there is one other thing not mentioned which is a plus for class "B"s. Even though the rig has a high initial cost, both the cost of ownership, and the cost per mile is inexpensive. An Euro van with 16-19 MPG isn't bad, all things considered. Tires are relatively cheap compared to truck tires.
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Old 08-11-2018, 12:36 PM   #28
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I think Roadtrek crash tests their models ............
Give us a link to some info if you can.

I don't see any NHTSA ratings on either the base vans or completed Class B's on their site: https://www.nhtsa.gov/ratings . My guess is that there's no requirement that they be tested.

I have seen the photo of rollover testing of a Roadtrek with a fiberglass roof. The vehicle did not rollover and passed their test.

It is disturbing to watch videos of what happens to the interiors of RVs in probably relatively low speed crashes.
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Old 08-11-2018, 02:04 PM   #29
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I think Roadtrek crash tests their models . . .


I doubt Roadtrek has done any crash test.
If they have done any, they would put it on youtube for sure.
(unless the test result is not good)

The only factory crash test I can find on Youtube is by Winnebago.

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Old 08-11-2018, 02:05 PM   #30
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Give us a link to some info if you can.

I don't see any NHTSA ratings on either the base vans or completed Class B's on their site: https://www.nhtsa.gov/ratings . My guess is that there's no requirement that they be tested.

I have seen the photo of rollover testing of a Roadtrek with a fiberglass roof. The vehicle did not rollover and passed their test.

It is disturbing to watch videos of what happens to the interiors of RVs in probably relatively low speed crashes.
NHTSA never tests anything but manufacturer's stock vehicles, and I agree all bets are off when a vehicle is heavily modified. In the case of RV's, modifications to structure (Roadtrek lowers floors and moves gas tank filler location), the added weight, and the great potential for flying debris and even flying structures adds many unknowns (except we can assure they are not good for passengers). However, "You pays yer money and you takes yer chances" as the saying goes.

When looking into a class B on the Chevy Express chassis, I was glad to see Roadtrek did some crash testing after their modifications. The most recent test of the Chevy Express on NHTSA's website was for '2010 (the year before mine). I was pleased to see a 5-Star rating for driver & passenger.

See pic-
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File Type: jpg Crash Test NHTSA 2010 - last yr rated.JPG (128.2 KB, 7 views)
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