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Old 08-14-2018, 10:18 AM   #1
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Question Dynamat then Reflectix then Thinsulate - ?

Hi all

Sound and thermal control - the best approach.

Looking to maybe buy a van (likely 2019 or 2020 Transit) and hire a company to do a minimal build in. I dont have the time or the skills to do it.

I’m researching the best way to dampen sound as much as possible, and also thermally keep heat out, and also keep cold out.

How about - From gas pedals to back, Visors to back. B pillars to back.

First (outer) later = Dynamat

plus Reflectix - same areas.

plus 3M Thinsulate - same areas.

Is the Reflectix a good idea?

If I use all three… should the Reflectix be next to the Dynamat ….or should the 3M Thinsulate be next to the Dynamat, with the Reflectix on the inside?

I have read that the Dynamat is a really good option for noise dampening…. does not dry out… works well… but am open to suggestion.

also - is this combo good for both walls + ceiling but also the FLOOR ?

thanks.
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Old 08-14-2018, 11:04 AM   #2
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Reflectix aluminized surface reflects infrared radiation, IR, heat. Due to its inner air bubbles it will provide some insulation but not much, any fiber or foam based insulations would be superior.

Reflectix placed directly against windows will reflect IR from outside, it is good.

Reflectix against any not IR transparent material is useless except its limited air bubbles providing some heat transfer flow restriction, not good.
Reflectix exposed to inside will reflect human generated IR and will help to retain heat during cold days.

A generic rule for Reflectix – it needs an air gap for it to work, minimum ˝” or better.

Most common mistakes are using Reflectix sandwiched between IR non-transparent materials like some plastics, metal, carpet, fabric etc.

I built my van using Thinsulate only. The van is very quiet and reasonably comfortable in low and high temperature, no AC but good fan and Espar D2.
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Old 08-14-2018, 01:16 PM   #3
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There are some spirited discussions along these lines over on Sprinter Forum. I know you said Transit, but when it comes to things like insulation, a van is a van.
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Old 08-14-2018, 02:27 PM   #4
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.

You need an air layer for the Reflectix to work.
if the aluminum foil is pressed against the van side panel, it becomes useless.

You can skip the Reflectix and the Dynamat.
Thinsulate has sound deadening property.
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Old 08-14-2018, 07:30 PM   #5
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Make sure you have all of your windows (including windshield) tinted with 3M Crystalline (FitRV video review).

We had this done on our rv and it's made an enormous difference in the heat entering via windows. Down south, this tint is the difference between running the AC full blast and still being hot vs running the AC on low and being pleasantly comfortable.
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Old 08-15-2018, 02:22 PM   #6
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Default Lizard Skin ?

Anyone have real world experience with Lizard Skin Ceramic Thermal Insulation Coating ? https://www.lizardskin.com/car-ceramic-insulation.html
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Old 08-15-2018, 03:08 PM   #7
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Anyone have real world experience with Lizard Skin Ceramic Thermal Insulation Coating ? https://www.lizardskin.com/car-ceramic-insulation.html
I know someone who upfitted their Ford Transit with Lizardskin insulation, and swears by it, for both sound insulation and thermal insulation. It isn't cheap, but he said it was one of the best investments he has done with his conversion.
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Old 08-15-2018, 07:59 PM   #8
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I don’t have experience with it but a while back was trying to find an actual spec for insulation, found none. The coating is about 1mm thick, I wish to see some insulation numbers for such thin layer.
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Old 08-16-2018, 01:21 AM   #9
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I gather that it's more of a reflective sort of thing vs. insulation per se.
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Old 08-16-2018, 02:55 AM   #10
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Quote:
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I gather that it's more of a reflective sort of thing vs. insulation per se.
As they tell you in "Intordouction to Thermodynamics": There are three ways that heat is transferred: Conduction in solids; Convection in fluids; and radiation in space. You need different methods to stop each.
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Old 08-20-2018, 07:51 PM   #11
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Default dynamat cheap alternative

Dynamat is pretty terrific when applied as a sound deadener in my experience. However, you can buy exactly the same material from Home Depot for a fraction of it's cost. It is called Useal, and the only disadvantage is that it comes in a 6" by 25' roll. so it would take longer to install. I have used it in three vehicles to improve the sound quality of door mounted speakers, with the by product of greatly reducing road noise coming through them. I have also lined the outside of my generator compartment with it (it already had a foil backed fiber insulation installed on the interior of the compartment, and it made a very significant difference there. I first used it 2 years ago, and it has shown zero sign of delaminating or releasing from the surface it was applied to. Just make sure to thoroughly clean the surface that it will be stuck on.
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Old 08-20-2018, 09:30 PM   #12
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Dynamat is pretty terrific when applied as a sound deadener in my experience. However, you can buy exactly the same material from Home Depot for a fraction of it's cost. It is called Useal, and the only disadvantage is that it comes in a 6" by 25' roll. so it would take longer to install. I have used it in three vehicles to improve the sound quality of door mounted speakers, with the by product of greatly reducing road noise coming through them. I have also lined the outside of my generator compartment with it (it already had a foil backed fiber insulation installed on the interior of the compartment, and it made a very significant difference there. I first used it 2 years ago, and it has shown zero sign of delaminating or releasing from the surface it was applied to. Just make sure to thoroughly clean the surface that it will be stuck on.
cool - thanks! Is Useal also self adhesive?
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Old 08-20-2018, 10:05 PM   #13
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Yes it is. It has a thin plastic sheet on the Butyl side that you peel off before application, again exactly like Dynamat. It is very, very sticky. Ideally after sticking it to your surface a roller should be used to insure perfect adhesion, but frankly I don't think that is necessary. I have found that hand pressure is sufficient, as long as you make sure to apply pressure to the entire surface of the sheet installed, and even though you will be applying multiple ribbons of Useal instead of a big flt sheet of Dynamat, making the installation over a panel taking a bit longer to finish, it's actually a lot easier to handle and apply flat than a big sheet.
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Old 08-20-2018, 10:56 PM   #14
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I have also lined the outside of my generator compartment with it (it already had a foil backed fiber insulation installed on the interior of the compartment, and it made a very significant difference there.
So you simply cover the generator box on the outside?
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Old 08-20-2018, 11:26 PM   #15
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I put it on the inside of the access door, on the entire area of the outside of the enclosure's floor, and on every surface of the outside of the enclosure that I could reach from the interior of the RV and my two adjacent rear storage areas. I ended up being able to cover about 80 to 90% of the enclosure box. Even if you can't reach every bit of a given panel, this material seems to alter the vibration frequency of a metal plate, effecting a sort of deadening effect that will still make your effort worthwhile. The more you can cover however, the better.
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