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Old 07-09-2018, 10:50 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 View Post
This was my first RV purchase in May 2017... before that I had a teardrop trailer.....
Here's a link to exactly what I got....

https://www.conejowholesaleauto.com/...beffb59e9eb708

I just don't want to lose control of the vehicle and roll over or have an accident... and if I ever want my wife to drive it...I need to make her comfortable as well....

I don't want to be that person... which is WHY I spent the money to handle these circumstances... I figured... I'm only going to do this ONCE and it might as well be right on MY TERMS....

All about making me feel more comfortable....now I can just drive and enjoy it with regular maintenance... I don't like cars or any vehicles with compromised systems....

Good luck...

I hope you do as well feel confident about your ride....
You have an interesting perspective.

A TPMS will NOT help stabilize your van *when* you have a "blowout." It merely tells you the tire pressures. Don't misunderstand, I have TPMS in my Jeep and it's really convenient... and I enjoy that I can be lazy about checking the pressures... but it can't inspect your tires for wear or cuts or bulges; tell-tale signs of problems. Checking pressures regularly, whether by TPMS or with a gauge will hopefully help you diagnose a tire problem before it becomes a run-flat with shredded sidewalls.

I have valve stem extensions on my duals on my Born Free, and I check the pressure and inspect the tires pretty regularly. And Avanti is right; if you DO manage to have a catastrophic sidewall failure (blowout) on one of the rear wheels there's a really good chance that the blown tire will be on the inside and it'll take the outside tire with it, your TPMS not withstanding. The one time TPMS is really useful is when one of the duals begins to deflate and you have enough warning that you can get it to the side of the road before it shreds. With today's tire technology though, and regular tire checks, that happens so infrequently that I'm willing to take the "risk."

So yes, once again technology is handy, but it really doesn't solve the "safety" issues. Honestly, the suspension upgrades you did will do a LOT more to help you maintain control in any emergent situation and was money well spent.
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Old 07-09-2018, 11:06 AM   #22
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The question regarding tire pressures while traveling is whether one feels comfortable with periodic checks or requires constant monitoring to feel comfortable. If it is the former, then either a tire gauge with proper dually valve extensions or an IR gun will get the job done.

If it is the latter, then only a reliable pressure monitoring system is sufficient.

Risk management requires two approaches; regular preventive tire maintenance, and some kind of monitoring while traveling as noted above. If you do preventive maintenance then while on the road slow leaks are the hazard to be monitored for.

It's worth noting that most vehicles are delivered with TPMS because they increase safety. Most of that increase comes from catching low pressures due to inadequate preventive maintenance..
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Old 07-09-2018, 01:33 PM   #23
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And Avanti is right; if you DO manage to have a catastrophic sidewall failure (blowout) on one of the rear wheels there's a really good chance that the blown tire will be on the inside and it'll take the outside tire with it, your TPMS not withstanding. The one time TPMS is really useful is when one of the duals begins to deflate and you have enough warning that you can get it to the side of the road before it shreds. With today's tire technology though, and regular tire checks, that happens so infrequently that I'm willing to take the "risk."

So yes, once again technology is handy, but it really doesn't solve the "safety" issues. Honestly, the suspension upgrades you did will do a LOT more to help you maintain control in any emergent situation and was money well spent.
I repeat:
IMO, TMPS is an totally essential safety feature for any dually setup. I was not talking about just 'catastrophic sidewall failure'. ANY rear tire failure (outside or inside), be it blowout, puncture, valve stem failure, a simple leak, can easily go unnoticed for many, many miles--careful inspections notwithstanding. You can't inspect your tires while you are driving, which can mean hundreds of miles of driving on a single tire. This is obviously extremely dangerous. A TPMS will alert you to this situation instantly, probably saving your tire and maybe even your life.

My advice: If you have duallies, get a TPMS. This is not the place to indulge in ludditeism.
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Old 07-09-2018, 02:52 PM   #24
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Default I understand that the tire pressure monitoring system is only a warning

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Originally Posted by hepcat View Post
You have an interesting perspective.

A TPMS will NOT help stabilize your van *when* you have a "blowout." It merely tells you the tire pressures. Don't misunderstand, I have TPMS in my Jeep and it's really convenient... and I enjoy that I can be lazy about checking the pressures... but it can't inspect your tires for wear or cuts or bulges; tell-tale signs of problems. Checking pressures regularly, whether by TPMS or with a gauge will hopefully help you diagnose a tire problem before it becomes a run-flat with shredded sidewalls.

I have valve stem extensions on my duals on my Born Free, and I check the pressure and inspect the tires pretty regularly. And Avanti is right; if you DO manage to have a catastrophic sidewall failure (blowout) on one of the rear wheels there's a really good chance that the blown tire will be on the inside and it'll take the outside tire with it, your TPMS not withstanding. The one time TPMS is really useful is when one of the duals begins to deflate and you have enough warning that you can get it to the side of the road before it shreds. With today's tire technology though, and regular tire checks, that happens so infrequently that I'm willing to take the "risk."

So yes, once again technology is handy, but it really doesn't solve the "safety" issues. Honestly, the suspension upgrades you did will do a LOT more to help you maintain control in any emergent situation and was money well spent.
YES.... I completely understand that the TPMS is not going to STABILIZE the vehicle...
It will give me a heads up when I'm losing air pressure and there's a feature that sounds an alarm when there's a sudden loss of pressure..... hopefully it's enough time for me to slow down ....
And, it's been helpful in the past with slow leaks... remember I had leaking valve stems initially and had to go back and get them replaced......

As Avanti said... A slow leak could turn into a BIG problem especially if it's the inside duals.....


And... thanks for agreeing with me that spending the money on all those suspension upgrades was a good idea.....it wasn't cheap....$3,100...

If it makes me feel more comfortable..and safer..I think it's worth it.......

I'm taking the RV back across the USA ...and want to have better control with the high winds... last year was more of a challenge....

It's amazing how many high winds we encountered on the open road....you really don't notice it that much when traveling around the city....a lot of structures shield and brake the winds.......
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Old 07-09-2018, 07:48 PM   #25
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Also helpful if you do not carry a spare as you can remove one wheel of your duelys to fit on the front and limp home with only on wheel on the back.
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Old 07-09-2018, 08:43 PM   #26
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Also helpful if you do not carry a spare as you can remove one wheel of your duelys to fit on the front and limp home with only on wheel on the back.
Look.. I'm not jettisoning my spare tire....WHY would this make any sense??

If anything I'll have to purchase a new spare if I use it for the front or back and toss the bad one away.

Besides.. the spare tire is underneath the coach on the driver's side...

What else would I use this space for....it's designed for a spare tire...

I see you didn't know that I have a spare.... sorry..I have one and going to obviously use it...
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Old 07-09-2018, 08:46 PM   #27
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Also helpful if you do not carry a spare as you can remove one wheel of your duelys to fit on the front and limp home with only on wheel on the back.
That's assuming you have the same type of wheels all around.

Some RV upfitters use cheaper steel wheels on the inner dually and aluminum wheels on the outside for good looks.

Steel wheels have a different thickness than the aluminum wheels. As a result, different length studs (non-standard) are needed to mount the wheels at each corner. If you don't have the correct length stud, you might be out of luck.
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:20 PM   #28
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Default Interesting response.... I'll check it out with Roadtrek

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That's assuming you have the same type of wheels all around.

Some RV upfitters use cheaper steel wheels on the inner dually and aluminum wheels on the outside for good looks.

Steel wheels have a different thickness than the aluminum wheels. As a result, different length studs (non-standard) are needed to mount the wheels at each corner. If you don't have the correct length stud, you might be out of luck.
My vehicle is a Roadtrek RS Adventurous... here's the vehicle and description.. I can't imagine why they would highlight a spare on my vehicle and then have "RESTRICTIONS" on how it could be used???

Maybe it's a thing on another vehicle?? To the best of my knowledge....it could be used on any tire ...

AND...I don't think that the RS Adventurous model has "offset wheels" like the Chevy Express van they use on the Roadtrek 210 model.....

I don't know.. maybe you might not agree..
I personally don't find anything particularly chincy on the Roadtrek RS Adventurous model...it is one of their top of the line models. And I don't think Roadtrek is a cheap company.


https://www.conejowholesaleauto.com/...beffb59e9eb708
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:25 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 View Post
My vehicle is a Roadtrek RS Adventurous... here's the vehicle and description.. I can't imagine why they would highlight a spare on my vehicle and then have "RESTRICTIONS" on how it could be used???

Maybe it's a thing on another vehicle?? To the best of my knowledge....it could be used on any tire ...

AND...I don't think that the RS Adventurous model has "offset wheels" like the Chevy Express van they use on the Roadtrek 210 model.....

I don't know.. maybe you might not agree..
I personally don't find anything particularly chincy on the Roadtrek RS Adventurous model...it is one of their top of the line models. And I don't think Roadtrek is a cheap company.


https://www.conejowholesaleauto.com/...beffb59e9eb708
You should check to see if your inner dually is made of steel.

or maybe you have all steel wheels with chrome wheel covers.
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:31 PM   #30
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I assume the conversation is about new vans.

My old Xplorer had an aftermarket dually kit on it, as did almost all the later Xplorer models. It didn't increase the carrying capacity at all over the normal 3500 Ram Van. It was purely a stability play on a short wheelbase van that had an extended length (and width) body. Coupled with the Helwig anti-sway bars, it made for a surprisingly stable platform.

All that is moot these days.

Transit not only has duallies, but it also employs an effective electronic anti-sway program to accommodate it's long rear overhang. Sprinter of course has it's own electronic stability control program, but for reasons of body height. In both these vans, the dually setup enables much higher payload capacity and offers nil in vehicle stablity in my view - it's all electronics now.
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