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Old 07-08-2018, 08:37 PM   #1
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Default If you have "dual wheels" in the back... does it make you feel safer and more stable?

Haven't seen too many people talking about the single vs. dual wheels in the back other than the increased cargo carrying weight capacity?

How many of you with the dual wheels feel more safe and secure on the road with the larger footprint of two extra tires??

Are you happy that you "chose" the duals over the single wheels?

I know I am very happy with that arrangement despite the fact that I have to purchase two extra tires when they have to be replaced...

I especially like the fact that the two tires seem more planted when turning corners less likely for the rig to roll over..

Even with the increased sway bar... I still think those extra tires have value.

Your thoughts??
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Old 07-08-2018, 08:39 PM   #2
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Why bother with dual wheels when one can do the job?

.
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Old 07-08-2018, 08:55 PM   #3
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Default You only have the single wheels in the back??

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Why bother with dual wheels when one can do the job?

.

Well.. weight capacity for one... more rubber on the road seems like a good idea... WHY????

Do you disagree with that ?
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Old 07-08-2018, 09:32 PM   #4
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Dual vs. Single rear tires is not an open choice. It is determined by your GVWR and tires. If you GVWR is 11,030 lbs and your rear axle is rated at 7,000 lbs you would not be able to find tires that can support that weight unless in a dual configuration.

I've seen people claim there dual rear wheels make their van more stable. I don't have any data/experience to form an opinion on the matter.
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Old 07-08-2018, 10:00 PM   #5
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Personal choice, I think. I don't care for how duallie stuff drives because of the 4 tires always trying to go straight ahead. This gives scuffing when turning and normally quite pronounced understeer. Duals also by design have the tire edges out of line between the front and rear, so you can get some very funny feel and wobbling in roads with deep tire path grooves in them because the edges of the tires hit the slopes differently in the rear compared to front.



You can get larger capacity tires and wheels, but not normally on everyday vehicles. Military, expedition, etc rigs are nearly always single wheels due to better traction in poor conditions.


Our 265-75-16 singles on the rear of our Chevy rate at 6830 per axle, but the van is rated lower than that.
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Old 07-08-2018, 10:11 PM   #6
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A dual wheel axle is solely a function of axle/tire weight carrying capacity.

My last B-Van, a '94 Airstream B-190 was on an e350 heavy-one ton chassis with a 460 and an overloaded single-tired rear axle. My current '95 Coachmen is on an e250 heavy 3/4 ton chassis (351W and 9" rear end and 8 lug wheels) and likely still has an overloaded single-tired rear axle and suspension; although not overloaded to the extent the Airstream was. While both likely could have benefitted from a dual-wheel axle, Ford only produced them on the cutaway class-C motorhome chassis (the Chinooks for example not the 19' extended cargo van platform.
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Old 07-08-2018, 11:34 PM   #7
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Default Sorry.... didn't mean to start a great debate

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Dual vs. Single rear tires is not an open choice. It is determined by your GVWR and tires. If you GVWR is 11,030 lbs and your rear axle is rated at 7,000 lbs you would not be able to find tires that can support that weight unless in a dual configuration.

I've seen people claim there dual rear wheels make their van more stable. I don't have any data/experience to form an opinion on the matter.
I didn't mean to touch a "nerve" on this issue... rather..I was interested in knowing if your decision to get dual wheels was a conscious choice..

Here's an article on this......


12 & 15-Passenger Vans – Still not a viable option :: The Redwoods Group

Operative language....

Because we consider the improvements to be insufficient to alter our historical stance, dual rear wheels, seat belts, increased rollover protection (FMVSS 220), increased body joint strength (FMVSS 221), and passenger space compartmentalization (FMVSS 222) remain necessary for unqualified mini-bus approval

I don't know... maybe you don't agree...for me...it's safer...
If you lose one wheel in a blowout....the other wheel will still be there.....
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Old 07-08-2018, 11:44 PM   #8
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We just got back from a month in the western states.


Particularly in the mountain areas like Denver or other similar area where they run a lot of shuttle vans to attractions, mountain tops, etc, we were very surprised to find that nearly every one of the shuttle vans was a transit single rear wheel van, unless they were the bigger capacity cutaway shuttles which were on duallie F350 cutaways.


Pretty shocking how quickly the Transits took over for pretty much everything else.
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Old 07-08-2018, 11:52 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBQ View Post
.

Why bother with dual wheels when one can do the job?

.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 View Post
Well.. weight capacity for one... more rubber on the road seems like a good idea... WHY????

Do you disagree with that ?

No, I am not disagreeing with you.
I am saying... if one can do the job, why use 2?
If one cannot do the job, of course you have to use two.

Single drives better, rides better, quieter, feels less bumps, have better traction in the winter, gives better fuel economy, easier to maintain, cheaper to replace, cheaper snow tires, less intrusion into the cabin (ie more room for your RV stuff)...

But there is a segment of the population who believe duallie is better than single, even when duallie is not needed.
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Old 07-08-2018, 11:57 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 View Post
I didn't mean to touch a "nerve" on this issue... rather..I was interested in knowing if your decision to get dual wheels was a conscious choice..
...

I don't know... maybe you don't agree...for me...it's safer...
If you lose one wheel in a blowout....the other wheel will still be there.....
Blowouts are extraordinarily rare. Shredded tires people often mistake for a "blowout" are usually just tires run flat at highway speed, likely as often caused by valve stem failure on passenger vehicles as tire failure.

Duals are no more "safe" than a single tire on an axle, are expensive, and a real pain if it's the inside tire that fails (and it usually is.) If you feel better buying a van with duals, more power to you. It just means you're spending more for a heavier chassis and will likelier have a heavier coach than those on single-tire axles.

I have had duals on both my Born Free coaches, and duals with a tag axle on my '85 Airstream 325 class A. The only tire failures I've experienced in almost twenty years of owning motorhomes were fronts. My preference is for single tires. You can rotate them properly and they're a LOT less expensive to replace.
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