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Old 10-04-2017, 02:20 PM   #1
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Default Indoor Storage For Class B

I would like opinions on storage for a Class B RV. I have a couple of options for storage. I can just park outdoors next to the garage with a cover or tarp, or I can pay for a large garage door to be installed and park in the existing heated garage. Local building code will not allow for a carport structure over parking area next to garage. This is our first RV. Any opinions on whether it is worth the expense to install the garage door vs. the problems that might occur with outside storage under a tarp would be helpful. Also, if you were installing a new garage door, what is the minimum height and width you would install? Thanks.
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:40 PM   #2
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Indoors is always better, in just about every way, IMO. As long as you have adequate ceiling height, I would certainly do the new door. You probably will get the cost back from resale on the van as it will be in better condition, plus the added value to the house.

I think most would want to go 11-12 feet opening height by at least 10 feet wide, but if you have the room, you may want to go bigger just in case you ever decide to move to a class C.
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Old 10-04-2017, 02:49 PM   #3
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Well that is a no-brainer. A heated garage (must be a cold climate area) for only the price of a garage door. I would jump on that. Just having the batteries warm is worth it. It must even have electricity for a trickle charger. Sitting outside is nothing but trouble.

My sprinter RV with AC just barely fits in my 10 ft tall door (modified for the full 10 ft ht). I think the RV is about 9' 10" tall with AC.
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Old 10-04-2017, 03:59 PM   #4
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I would probably go for the door, too, if I were in your position. However, I disagree that it is a no-brainer. In my fairly long experience with two different rigs, I have seen very little downside to outdoor storage. Modern paints are incredibly robust. If anything, cold storage is probably BETTER than heat during downtime. Doesn't hurt a fully-charged and disconnected battery at all. Moreover, a modest solar panel and a Trik-L-Start will keep all your batteries happy and ready to go.

The only real exception is sun damage to the interior. Good shades solves that one. Some people have critter issues, but I never have.

If you DO decide to go with outdoor storage DO NOT use a tarp. Does far more harm than good. Traps dirt, causing abrasion in the wind.
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Old 10-04-2017, 06:51 PM   #5
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We pay for enclosed off-site storage, $135 per month which includes electricity (but not heat, which we don't need).

We ceased needing an electrical hook-up after installing our lithium battery system, but we like the storage facility so much that we just continued the contract as-is. Conveniently, it also has a really good dump station and water supply.

Sun damage varies depending on your location and is correlated with heat. On the Gulf Coast, there is no way I would consider outdoor storage. We had to keep our rig at our house for an extended period while we were DIYing the lithium system. I was horrified at how visibly accelerated the UV degradation became during that period. By the time we were done with the lithium, I was looking at having to tackle a new caulk job and roof sealant / total re-coating project on a rig that started out looking like it would need little to no work in the shorter term.
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Old 10-04-2017, 09:22 PM   #6
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Recently, we decided to move to a single level home and due to market limitation decided to build. It was a very reasonable cost to raise the ceiling to 12í and garage doors to 10í height. A lot of benefits but 2 came to the top:

- No winterizing needed
- Doing any work is done under the roof, for a few days long projects I donít have to pack for nights.
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Old 10-04-2017, 09:50 PM   #7
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I think that were you live is a big consideration, especially in the winter, or if you live in a high humidity area.

Underbody corrosion is greatly increased in areas that cause condensation from the ground, snow, etc. It is a combination of high humidity, warm days and cool nights type of thing, along with air circulation blocked by things like snow.

Many people here in Minnesota store their classic cars, and very many of them put a sheet of plastic down if the storage barn is unheated. The bottom of a vehicle will stay cold for a long, long, time in the morning and if the sun is out and melting snow or evaporating puddles, it will condense on all the underbody parts and rust them.

In hot, low humidity areas, just put a sunscreen over it, but in the north, keeping it from seeing big temp and humidity swings is the most important part, and much more important than the actual temp and humidity.

All of this also effects the rest of the van also, but to a lesser degree than the underbody.
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Old 10-04-2017, 11:32 PM   #8
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Yes to indoors. It makes a big difference here where the climate seems similar to what Booster describes. That underbody rust shows up on infrequently used RV's even if not driven on salted roads.

You really get to understand the meaning of relative humidity here.
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Old 10-04-2017, 11:37 PM   #9
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There is a huge difference between a classic car and a modern vehicle. Corrosion was a very big issue up through the early 1990s. On every vehicle I have owned since then, it has been a total non-issue (and I keep vehicles for a long time). Perhaps trucks have lagged somewhat, but neither of my Sprinters have had any issue with outdoor storage. I do admit that modern corrosion-avoidance techniques don't always extend to the upfitter-added stuff we have on our RVs. Best to keep an eye on them under any scenario.

I heartily agree with both of George's reasons for wanting a garage, however.
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Old 10-04-2017, 11:43 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avanti View Post
There is a huge difference between a classic car and a modern vehicle. Corrosion was a very big issue up through the early 1990s. On every vehicle I have owned since then, it has been a total non-issue (and I keep vehicles for a long time). Perhaps trucks have lagged somewhat, but neither of my Sprinters have had any issue with outdoor storage. I do admit that modern corrosion-avoidance techniques don't always extend to the upfitter-added stuff we have on our RVs. Best to keep an eye on them under any scenario.

I heartily agree with both of George's reasons for wanting a garage, however.
Here in the frozen north, we still see lots of vehicles with rust, from Subaru to Sprinter and most everything else. While some vehicles seem to be a bit better, many, many, are not and have lots of rust holes in them, and nearly every nut and bolt on the undercarriage is rusted solid. I have worked on lots of them over the years, and a torch is a Minnesota mechanics best friend to get off rusted stuff.
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