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Old 05-31-2018, 12:20 AM   #21
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Interblog,
Tongue in cheek but it looks to me like you have no choice but to try Hughes Gen 5 and tell us how it works!

Their website says nothing about it being on an RV so we would have to work through the lady in Tucson. I just don't get a good feeling about it. All the good reviews are on proprietary websites tho I do appreciate the link. The Facebook link is run by the person that sells them. I couldn't get a read on all 66 posts for some reason and the ones I did get appeared dated.
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Old 05-31-2018, 07:11 AM   #22
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The comments at the end of this review say don't bother with Hughes Gen 5.

https://www.reviews.org/internet-ser...esnet-reviews/
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Old 05-31-2018, 12:03 PM   #23
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Technomadia did a review of HughesNet Gen5 about a year ago. Their take on it is that it is starting to show promise, but theory does not equate to real world outcomes. At this point, the review consensus seems to be that it's an ISP of absolute last resort.

https://www.rvmobileinternet.com/rev...ughesnet-gen5/
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Old 05-31-2018, 01:47 PM   #24
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You should understand that the Gen 5 satellites are still in geosynchronous orbit, which means that the latency of an Internet connection is the better part of a second and isn't ever going to get any better. Even if everything else in the system were perfect, the speed of light is not going to improve.

The new generation of low-earth-orbit "swarm" satellites that everybody is in the middle of launching is the only hope for really good satellite Internet. And, they are not going to need huge and/or fancy antennas.
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Old 05-31-2018, 01:52 PM   #25
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Yes, satellite internet connection is the future of the internet.

https://www.digitaltrends.com/comput...-fcc-approval/

Home - OneWeb | OneWorld
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Old 05-31-2018, 01:55 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Viperml View Post
Yes, satellite internet connection is the future of the internet.

https://www.digitaltrends.com/comput...-fcc-approval/

Home - OneWeb | OneWorld
Hence my referenced option above of waiting for Elon to get off his butt.
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Old 05-31-2018, 01:58 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InterBlog View Post
Hence my referenced option above of waiting for Elon to get off his butt.
Elon is not the only player in the game. Hence my mention of OneWeb.
Also, do not discount google. They are still a player to provide global internet coverage. They have scaled back on their original plans but do not discount them and other companies as well.
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Old 05-31-2018, 02:37 PM   #28
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Whatever happened to Motosat Datastorm? Are we not talking about it because it is too big for a B? It used to be the rage and now I seldom see it mentioned.
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Old 05-31-2018, 04:03 PM   #29
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Sometimes having good mobile internet lets me work remotely and stay out a few days extra. Iíve been using a Cradlepoint IBR600 with a Mobile Mark multi element antenna on the roof that has both LTE and WiFi antennas. Has worked pretty well. Purchased both from https://3gstore.com/. A bit pricy but it has worked well and has reliable connections to the antenna. I can often get enough improvement for internet even when my smartphone canít. Originally I used a pepwave soho router with a USB modem. I could never get the antenna connection to work right and it took a long time to get it to fallback to LTE when a WiFi connection was not available. Hooked up to ATT family plan with unlimited data. Pay about an extra $25 a month to have the SIM card for the Cradlepoint. I understand that Cradlepoint has a dual SIM card version so maybe one could stick both a Verizon and an ATT card in and use whichever is working best. With this setup, notebooks, tablets and smartphones can all hook on to the Cradlepoint router. There are some interesting antennas from Panorama at 3g Store as well.

This setup is not amplified. Sometimes I just find higher ground to get better LTE.

This Winegard product looks interesting too http://www.winegard.com/connect but I havenít tried it. Having everything from a single vendor makes some sense to me. Especially one that knows antennas like Winegard.
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Old 05-31-2018, 04:29 PM   #30
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Quote:
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Sometimes having good mobile internet lets me work remotely and stay out a few days extra. Iíve been using a Cradlepoint IBR600 with a Mobile Mark multi element antenna on the roof that has both LTE and WiFi antennas. ....
I've heard others speak highly of Cradlepoint. I glance at their webpages and see standard language such as "3G/4G Verizon with multi-band LTE". That's fine, but what is it in terms of their technology that supposedly makes it superior to other options? In lay language, if possible.

I've not yet investigated it seriously because it is carrier-specific here in the U.S., and it can get pricey because of that.

In a very recent and perverse twist, Verizon negotiated reciprocity with most, if not all, Canadian carriers. Whereas a Canadian subscriber may be limited to just their carrier, I bounce among three of the largest while at my land in Canada, at no extra charge. Of course, the carrying capacity is not good on any of them, compared to what I can access in Houston.

But I'm not sure how that would work functionally if I was trying to use Cradlepoint in Canada. For that matter, I'm not even sure that the practical outcome of this reciprocity is a good thing in my circumstances. Multiple choices seem to confuse the hell out of my Netgear AC791L.
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