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Old 03-13-2018, 02:40 AM   #1
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Default Old tech? What the heck!

It seems that B manufacturers are in a race for new technology. Many discussions on this forum show a great interest in the latest technology available for Bs. There is a lot of excitement of having non generator power for air conditioning when boondocking, for example.

Truthfully, I prefer the old stuff. Maybe that is because I am kinda old myself or, maybe, it is because I want a traveling, camping, touring experience that is a little more basic.


We have a nice 2013 Class C Phoenix Cruiser 2350 and nice 2007 Roadtrek 210. The PC has 300 watts of solar, a big inverter, dual power water heater, surround sound, two TVs, dual electric recliner/sofa combo etc.

The 2007 Roadtrek has what a 2007 Roadtrek had when tricked out back then including a five cubic foot refrigerator, more storage than most small Cs, a three way refrig, six gallons of good hot water and so on. Plus a big Chevy engine and incredibly comfortable Flexsteel seats up front.

We love our Roadtrek because camping and traveling in it is more than a journey: it is an experience. We don't want a lot of modern conveniences because, for us, that makes it sorta the same as a nice hotel room or even our home.

We would miss a lot of our experience and fun (at least for us) in managing our old tech when we are (most of the time)off grid and we seldom use hookups. We manage to live comfortably without a lot of new tech and comfort gadgets. Heck, I even prefer maps to a GPS. I love the feel and overview of a good state road map and we seldom drive the interstates. There is much to see in the small towns and places with a B.

Now, we are not tech illiterate. I have a pretty reasonable amount of knowledge. I bought my first computer for a business in 1974 and go back to DOS and I am now running Windows 10. We have PCs, IPads, Iphones, GPS, etc. We also have some antiquated things called maps. We simply have no desire to have instant hot water or to have thousand dollar lithium batteries in an RV.

I have no desire for a compressor refrig in a small motorhome and I have done all the maintenance on our rigs for the 36 years we have owned four Bs and three Cs.

For those that want these things, I salute you and hope you have a lot of joy and many miles of happy traveling and enjoying your rigs. I am not knocking you or the incredible technology that is available. I just love the old tried and true, trouble free and proven stuff.

I just wonder: am I the only guy on this forum that feels this way? I am starting to feel a bit lonely

or maybe I remember all those years in a tent!!

Paul
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Old 03-13-2018, 02:51 AM   #2
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. . . I am starting to feel a bit lonely
Paul
Do not apologize! I'm on your side. I also have an older analog ham transceiver which gives the digital ones a real run for their money.
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Old 03-13-2018, 03:15 AM   #3
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I have been following F/B on the Rodtrek Chevy and Roadtrek/Hymer Groups. I have read the inputs about repeated visit to the Dealers, hard time getting parts, and a myriad of things. There are a few that really level the guns at RT and Hymer for the QA, or lack of it. I can't imagine my anger if I paid the price being paid for these hi-tech vehicles, and it spends more time in a shop than on the road. And like we have heard thru out, that many Dealers are saying you have to wait an extraordinary long time for an appointment...or if they didn't buy it, you will have to wait until they get their own customers serviced. Sure glad I have a Chevy. Ron.
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Old 03-13-2018, 03:49 AM   #4
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I just wonder: am I the only guy on this forum that feels this way? I am starting to feel a bit lonely

or maybe I remember all those years in a tent!!

Paul
Nope, while I like some modern conveniences, I like old school tech because it's simpler and more available.

My newest vehicle until recently was a 93, and I accidentally bought a 94 from a friend by saying "Hey you know that Jeep you have in my garage?" and his reply was "You mean your Jeep?" and I just went with it.
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Old 03-13-2018, 05:11 AM   #5
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.

If you are buying new, you should consider a compressor fridge.
If you already have an RV with a working absorption fridge,
then there is no reason to change.
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Old 03-13-2018, 05:24 AM   #6
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I have no desire for a compressor refrig in a small motorhome and I have done all the maintenance on our rigs for the 36 years we have owned four Bs and three Cs.
I've used both absorption and efficient compressor refrigerators and after using the compressor version I was left wondering what took me so long.
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Old 03-13-2018, 05:53 AM   #7
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I agree witt compressor fridge positive comments, painless, no leveling, reliable. My fridge is Isotherm 85l (3 CuFt), sufficient for week long camping, 230Ah AGM, 300W solar, no Onan, shore power, love it.
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Old 03-13-2018, 10:38 AM   #8
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I’m also in the KISS Group .

I recently added 400 Watts of Solar, 448AHs of AGMs and a 2000 Watt Inverter/Charger simply to make my 2005 RT 210P have more “Off-the-Grid” capacity. After Full-timing 3+ years on just two wet cells, this setup is “Pure Luxury” .
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Old 03-13-2018, 01:21 PM   #9
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angelmroman, if I were full timing in a 210P I would do the same thing. My point in the original post was reflecting on the fact that most B owners use their rigs several times a year but don't full time.

I have always carefully maintained my refrigerators and have simply never had a problem with any of them. Given the short wheelbase and narrow width that defines a B, I would level that baby even if I didn't have a refrig. Otherwise, we would be sleeping a bit oddly.

To each his own and our individual needs obviously dictate our individual preferences.

Paul
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Old 03-13-2018, 01:55 PM   #10
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"Sweet spots" are called sweet SPOTS rather than "sweet end member conditions" for a good reason. The optimal position to occupy is usually somewhere on the continuum, and so it is with the continuum between old school and new school technology.

For instance, I was initially convinced that old school was the way to go with a refrigerator. If you'd like to know just how much misery it took to change my mind on that one, you can read that full painful and expensive story here.

That being the case, there are a number of new-school improvements that I believe to be entirely regressive, having been aimed at increasing MSRP rather than increasing overall B van performance. A partial list is as follows:

(1) Macerator - they break too often and are subject to freeze damage. Good old fashioned gravity dump may be archaic to some, but it's extremely difficult to have it fail in any way.

(2) Auto-retract awning - Don't even get me started. Read this, or this, or this, or any one of multiple other threads.

(3) Auto-retract electric step at the slider door - ditto. Just search for it.

(4) New-school in-line hot water heaters tend to only work well if the hot water is run continuously, which is not going to be the case while boondocking or while camping at two-connection sites (water and electricity only). I researched it. The old Atwood dinosaurs arguably work better in such conditions.

(5) Electric window shades - OMG, read this. I have arms and hands attached to my body. I can pull shades down manually with no trouble.

I've made Airstream-related citations above because that's the type of rig I know best, but much the same branded components are used by multiple Class B manufacturers.

There are other components I could add to the list, but you get the idea. My husband and I have the newest-possible-school electrical system in our rig, but we intentionally retain much of the original old-school equipment for its superior reliability.
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