Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-11-2009, 12:51 AM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 11
Default Using 110V House Current

We have recently purchased a 2005 Road Trek 190 Popular Motor Home. I will have many questions over the coming months ?(years) but will start out with one. I have been trying to connect the power cable from the RV to 110 outlets in my garage using a 15 Amp adaptor and extra heavy duty extension cord but the house breaker trips shortly after connection.The only other draw on the 110 plugs is a freezer and removing that from the circuit does not improve the situation. Am I going to need to have an electrician install a dedicated line? I would really like to keep a charge on the house battery and run the refridgerator when not using the RV. Any thoughts are appreciated.
__________________

JohnandJoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2009, 04:13 AM   #2
Platinum Member
 
Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Sarnialabad, The Newly Elected People's Republic of Canuckistan
Posts: 3,196
Default Re: Using 110V House Current

Assuming you've got everything in the van turned off prior to plugging in, it might be a
shorted power cord, or the extra heavy duty extension cord may be too light or too long
and might be the problem. I bought a used 2002 190P and it looked as though the cord
had been spliced, probably damaged somehow. However, I've had no problems plugging the van
into the outside house receptacle with the 15 A converter plug. The panel breaker is a 15A too.
I've run the OEM heat pump, and the 110V outlets while plugged in to my house.
I only use the cord/plug attached to the van and don't add any additional extension cords, heavy
duty or otherwise. Can you do that, or do you have to use an extension cord to reach?
Is the breaker to your house's outlet at least 15A?

I didn't find too many hits on this site, but here's one from another site with some ideas.
Maybe one will ring a bell for you....
http://en.allexperts.com/q/RV-Repair-83 ... rtor-1.htm
__________________

__________________
It's not a sprint(er) (unless you make it one), it's (hopefully) a marathon.
RV - 2002 Roadtrek 190 Popular (Chevy) - SOLD.
TV - 2016 Jeep Wrangler Sahara Unlimited
RV - 2016 Winnebago Sunstar 26HE (Ford F53, Triton V10 3 valve, 6 speed transmission) - SOLD (sort of)
Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2009, 08:44 AM   #3
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 52
Default Re: Using 110V House Current

Hi,
I plug my 08 RT into a 20 amp circuit in my garage with no trouble. I run the AC or Furnace along with the fridge and sometimes watch TV. Your garage should have a 20 amp circuit not 15 and that could be the problem but I would look at your extension cord first. Many outdoor cords look heavy duty but are actually small wire like #16. This will cause excessive current draw and will trip the breaker. Also too much length will do the same thing. I am using a #12 cord of 25 foot length and have no problems. Check your cords...

Sorry I misread your post and you are not using the extension. I would check that the receptacle is 20 amps, if not you should have an electrician install a 20 or better a 30 amp circuit just for the RT.
Pete
pete is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2009, 03:30 PM   #4
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 11
Default Re: Using 110V House Current

Thanks for the excellent advice. I am using a new, 12ga extra heavy duty extension cord but due to the present location of plugs in my garage (the van won't fit into the garage) I need to run 50 feet of extension cord. A posting on another site suggested that if the breaker is gfci protected something like the water heater on the van might be tripping it. The breaker is 20 amp but it is indeed gfci protected and I know the electric water heater element comes on when plugged into AC, but I don't know how to prevent it. Is there a switch which will keep the electric water heater element from coming on when plugged in? I'm thinking perhaps I should just bite the bullit and have someone install a 30amp breaker dedicated to the RV which would also reduce the extension cord needed by about half. Thanks again for your help.

John
JohnandJoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-11-2009, 03:46 PM   #5
Platinum Member
 
Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Sarnialabad, The Newly Elected People's Republic of Canuckistan
Posts: 3,196
Default Re: Using 110V House Current

Off the top of my head (I've got a propane water heater, so this is a guess) my water heater has a switch over
the galley counter, just right of the entertainment unit. Not sure about electric heaters, and whether it's just
a default setting when you're on shore power. I also have a breaker panel at the rear of my '02P next to the
side access to the water heater area, under the driver's side bed. It has a darker brown metal face plate which
is removable. Again, I've never tried to disable a circuit in the van, but if it were possible, I'd look there first.
You might have a look there for a water heater breaker you could disable.
I'd attack this from the van side of things first, in case you're on the road where you can't take your garage
with you. But if all else fails, and it's just when you're parked at home maybe beefing up the outlet amperage
is the way to go.
__________________
It's not a sprint(er) (unless you make it one), it's (hopefully) a marathon.
RV - 2002 Roadtrek 190 Popular (Chevy) - SOLD.
TV - 2016 Jeep Wrangler Sahara Unlimited
RV - 2016 Winnebago Sunstar 26HE (Ford F53, Triton V10 3 valve, 6 speed transmission) - SOLD (sort of)
Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-12-2009, 02:22 PM   #6
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Virginia
Posts: 569
Default Re: Using 110V House Current

We have an '05 RT190P and do exactly what you are trying to do; have never had a problem. Once connected, we have run the air and fan, along with a few lights without a problem. I plug ours into an outside outlet, and it is not a dedicated outlet. I'd look to the extension cord first for some form of breakdown. Also, thought you might run that plug to another outlet and see if it will hold. If, by chance you have a generator (other than the one in the RT), try using it. I am betting the problem to be the extension cord. Keep us posted on the resolve, Ron
__________________
Ron J. Moore
'15 RT210P
Ron J. Moore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2009, 02:21 PM   #7
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 11
Default Re: Using 110V House Current

FYI I resolved my situation by having a electrician run a 30 amp line dedicated to the Road Trek to my garage and that seems to have solved the problem. Thanks for the info and I have another question. What is the recommended tire pressures for the 190 Popular?

Thanks again.

John
JohnandJoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2009, 02:43 PM   #8
Platinum Member
 
markopolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 7,207
Default Re: Using 110V House Current

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnandJoy
...................... What is the recommended tire pressures for the 190 Popular? ......................
It will probably show 50 front and 80 rear on the drivers side door or door pillar. I was quite happy with 65 front and 80 rear in my 2004 Roadtrek.
__________________
'97 GMC Savana 6.5L Turbo Diesel Custom Camper Van: https://www.classbforum.com/forums/m...icture206.html & http://www.classbforum.com/forums/f6...vana-5864.html
markopolo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2009, 03:11 AM   #9
Platinum Member
 
Mike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Sarnialabad, The Newly Elected People's Republic of Canuckistan
Posts: 3,196
Default Re: Using 110V House Current

Recommended minimum pressures are 50 psi front 80 psi rear as marko says, on my 2002 190P as well.
I try to keep my spare inflated to 80 psi. You can always let air out if you blow a front tire, but.....
There are a couple of interesting tire related threads on here, including one about "new" tires that might be past their
"best before" date.
__________________
It's not a sprint(er) (unless you make it one), it's (hopefully) a marathon.
RV - 2002 Roadtrek 190 Popular (Chevy) - SOLD.
TV - 2016 Jeep Wrangler Sahara Unlimited
RV - 2016 Winnebago Sunstar 26HE (Ford F53, Triton V10 3 valve, 6 speed transmission) - SOLD (sort of)
Mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2010, 01:49 AM   #10
New Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 5
Default Re: Using 110V House Current

Can someone explain why a too-small or too-long cord would trip the circuit breaker? Higher resistance means lower voltage; when I use such a cord with a power tool, it doesn't trip the circuit breaker - just won't start. 12-ga. is capable of carrying 20A at least 70'. If I were in this position, with a newly acquired used van,an adequate extension cord, and other people with similar vehicles had no problem, my first concern would be that there might be a short in the vehicle. A van water heater - if it's the only thing on - shouldn't trip a 15A circuit breaker. Electric heating elements are not like motors - they have no starting surge.
__________________

dadsfolk is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT. The time now is 01:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.