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Old 06-07-2019, 04:01 AM   #1
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Default Where are Beeees.

We just came from the great trip to the beautiful Beverly Beach Campground between Newport and Depoe Bay on the Oregon coast. We camp in the A tent loop close to the coast. Just before we left, we scouted for the best campsites for the next visit.

The campground was about 95% full (256 sites total) with most vacancy on tent sites and we were the only one in our B-class Camper Van, interesting data point. Trailers were predominant, some Cs, some As, and ONE Camper van.

https://oregonstateparks.org/index.c...age&parkId=164
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Old 06-07-2019, 12:37 PM   #2
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The only drawbacks to tent sites is you sometimes canít find a level spot or a long enough spot to park a van or the parking spot is a bit remote from the fire pit and picnic table. I havenít camped where I need to run an air conditioner or generator and an electrical hook up is not necessary for me. I guess the only other drawback is there are a lot of little kids running amok.
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Old 06-07-2019, 01:30 PM   #3
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We just came from the great trip to the beautiful Beverly Beach Campground between Newport and Depoe Bay on the Oregon coast. We camp in the A tent loop close to the coast. Just before we left, we scouted for the best campsites for the next visit.

The campground was about 95% full (256 sites total) with most vacancy on tent sites and we were the only one in our B-class Camper Van, interesting data point. Trailers were predominant, some Cs, some As, and ONE Camper van.

https://oregonstateparks.org/index.c...age&parkId=164
We are indeed in an elite class of campers. Statistics show this with "b" sales being the smallest segment of the rv market. But like you, when we see another b it makes an impression because they are so rare.

Usually our situation looks like this whether in an rv park or state/national park. Our tiny b gets lost among the c's, a's, trailers, and 5th wheels.
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Old 06-07-2019, 02:09 PM   #4
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When I first started driving a B back and forth to AZ for the winter from ND or MN in 2004, it was totally exciting to see another B because they were so rare. We used to keep count and report the numbers on the RV sites... maybe 2 or 3 for the whole trip.

I just arrived back north after 10 days of traveling. I saw 3 or 4 every day (except one last day on the blue highways of Iowa) The vast majority were older Roadtreks or Pleasureways. Of course newer Sprinter rigs are usually stealthy and they can sneak past on the other side without me noticing. Most Campgrounds and Rest Stops had at least one other than me. I didn't see any other Promaster based rigs though. We are still the minority...
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Old 06-07-2019, 05:30 PM   #5
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The only drawbacks to tent sites is you sometimes canít find a level spot or a long enough spot to park a van or the parking spot is a bit remote from the fire pit and picnic table. I havenít camped where I need to run an air conditioner or generator and an electrical hook up is not necessary for me. I guess the only other drawback is there are a lot of little kids running amok.
Practically all tent campsites were very flat and level. My issue is sun exposure for solar charging, I usually use Google map to select opened sites.
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Old 06-07-2019, 05:41 PM   #6
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My van is tiny as well.

Our first camper van was 1977 VW Westfalia, those days camper vans were popular, either domestic or VW, Sportsmobile was very popular. Based on my memories there were way more Camper Vans then. During our recent trip to Key West (almost 9K miles) we have seen B Class, not many thou.

This recent Beverly Beach Campground was unusual, we were about 0.5% of the total population.
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Old 06-07-2019, 06:11 PM   #7
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Practically all tent campsites were very flat and level. My issue is sun exposure for solar charging, I usually use Google map to select opened sites.
I was referring to where they want you to park your vehicle. Tent only campsites are usually older and where you park is not as important as providing a level site for pitching a tent.

As for sun in Minnesota and the upper Midwest where we mostly summer camp there are very few sites with unobstructed sun. We winter travel mostly in the southwest and the days are way too short and the sun angle is low so don't get the full potential of solar. That's why our next B will not have solar panels.
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Old 06-07-2019, 06:15 PM   #8
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I experienced places where a:

B can use a tent site, no problem As Long As there are plenty of tent sites for tent campers.

B can use a tent site, but a tent has to be used. The B is simply a vehicle with a tent inside like the other vehicles.

No B can use a tent site.
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Old 06-07-2019, 06:21 PM   #9
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Class Bs are still only about 2% of the total RV market so finding another B in a campground of 100 campsites the odds are just one other. They do tend to gather in certain parts of the country and parks. Joshua Tree National Park for instance will have many more Class Bs. That's my experience every time we go there.
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Old 06-07-2019, 07:29 PM   #10
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These tent sites are like RV sites without utilities. What you described are called here walk-in campsites. There were about 200 (256 campsites) of RVs on this campground so 1/200, that is low. The tilted picture is our campsite from the reservation site.
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Old 06-08-2019, 07:19 AM   #11
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Default It's definitely a niche market..... it's a choice.

There's significantly less Class B's... for several reasons in my opinion;

1.For the price, it's a lot more money per square foot.... and people like more space..

2. Many people are interested in taking their families and Class B's are really designed for two people.

3. While you could live in your Class B, it's really more of a personal touring vehicle,. I don't encounter many people driving to a particular location and staying in a Class B for a few weeks...I suppose you could, but, the vehicle is so mobile, many people just don't.

4. Whether you purchase a Class B from an company that did the conversion or did it yourself makes a big difference... If you do it yourself, maybe you can control some of the costs.....it still is an expensive thing buying a van and either doing your own work or hiring someone to do it.

A lot of people don't have the facility or knowledge on how to do that..... and purchasing either a new or used model can range from $75,000 to $200,000.

For this kind of money, most people would want a large Class C or Class A RV....

People have been sleeping in their vehicles for a really long time.... check out this 1910 Pierce Arrow Touring Landau

https://historygarage.com/100-years-history-rvs/

http://theoldmotor.com/?tag=1910-66-h-p-pierce-arrow-touring-landau

If you do the inflation index on the 1910 Pierce Arrow, the adjusted price for 2019 would be over $200,000.

Read the article about the Piece Arrow....it even had a telephone to talk with the driver...NO, you couldn't make phone calls to other people... It did have a toilet.

A lot has changed since the first RVs, but, like automobiles, they have remained pretty much the same....

Class B's as a group are just a rarer commodity, but, I think they are catching on. People seem to like the mobility and the better fuel economy. Besides, parking a Class B is a whole lot easier than larger RVs....
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Old 06-08-2019, 01:16 PM   #12
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Nobody is arguing that B's are a massive number in RVs. We have always been a minority... and always will be for all the obvious reasons - mainly size and cost. But in the 15 years since I bought my first one, the increase in B's on the road has been massive.

The good news is that the millennials and young families are entering the market in increasing numbers as Hymer and Winnebago have been courting them.
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Old 06-08-2019, 01:52 PM   #13
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If you want to see more B's on the road join groups and rally with them. During the month of May I attended three such rallies in Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania and hooked up with maybe 130 or so Class B owners.

What's strange is the looks of wonderment on other Class B owners that coincidentally arrive at a campground with those rallies taking place after traveling many miles with Class B's few and far between. Many quickly become friends and attend future rallies.

Other types of RV owners look upon us as "cute" and a little bemused.
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Old 06-13-2019, 07:22 PM   #14
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There's significantly less Class B's... for several reasons in my opinion;

1.For the price, it's a lot more money per square foot.... and people like more space..

2. Many people are interested in taking their families and Class B's are really designed for two people.

3. While you could live in your Class B, it's really more of a personal touring vehicle,. I don't encounter many people driving to a particular location and staying in a Class B for a few weeks...I suppose you could, but, the vehicle is so mobile, many people just don't.

4. Whether you purchase a Class B from an company that did the conversion or did it yourself makes a big difference... If you do it yourself, maybe you can control some of the costs.....it still is an expensive thing buying a van and either doing your own work or hiring someone to do it.

A lot of people don't have the facility or knowledge on how to do that..... and purchasing either a new or used model can range from $75,000 to $200,000.

For this kind of money, most people would want a large Class C or Class A RV....

People have been sleeping in their vehicles for a really long time.... check out this 1910 Pierce Arrow Touring Landau

https://historygarage.com/100-years-history-rvs/

1910 66 h.p. Pierce-Arrow Touring Landau | The Old Motor

If you do the inflation index on the 1910 Pierce Arrow, the adjusted price for 2019 would be over $200,000.

Read the article about the Piece Arrow....it even had a telephone to talk with the driver...NO, you couldn't make phone calls to other people... It did have a toilet.

A lot has changed since the first RVs, but, like automobiles, they have remained pretty much the same....

Class B's as a group are just a rarer commodity, but, I think they are catching on. People seem to like the mobility and the better fuel economy. Besides, parking a Class B is a whole lot easier than larger RVs....
Great comments..I like that I can park pretty much anywhere...my friends who have trailer and others with Class C have more limitations..only thing that kinda bugs me is having to unplug if I need to run out to get something..but all in all, LOVE my Class B!!!
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Old 06-13-2019, 08:56 PM   #15
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Default Of course, but, most Class B's don't normally do full hookups

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Great comments..I like that I can park pretty much anywhere...my friends who have trailer and others with Class C have more limitations..only thing that kinda bugs me is having to unplug if I need to run out to get something..but all in all, LOVE my Class B!!!
We only hookup for electric... Unhooking, storing a few chairs, electric cord, and securing cabinets...we can be rolling in 10 minutes.

It's definitely easier than most other RVs... we shop with the Class B on trips... easy.

Class B's are extremely mobile. . that's why they are great touring coaches.
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Old 06-13-2019, 08:56 PM   #16
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Default B-story

Sometimes us "B's" don't want to be noticed. Especially with Homeowner's associations and when stealth camping.

Someday I will pull all the stickers and stripes off my Roadtrek. They're pretty faded as it is. And Roadtrek designed many of their RVs to be less noticeable, hiding the vents and putting most of the plumbing behind cleverly designed side skirts.

But a big reason you don't see as many B's in campgrounds, is they have a lot more options for a place to spend a single night, or a week or two. The combination of a three-quarter ton or one-ton truck chassis with a steel exterior shell makes for a really tough vehicle that can go off-pavement in BLM or National Forest areas that don't have established campgrounds.

So mum's the word -- sometimes it's good to keep a low profile -- even when it has three windows on top.
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Old 06-13-2019, 09:17 PM   #17
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We counted over a dozen B's, at Doran Park in Bodega Bay, last weekend. Northern California is crawling with B Van's of all description.
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Old 06-13-2019, 10:01 PM   #18
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Default The collective noun for Class B is...

sebtown -- I think that's what we call a swarm of B's.

And it reflects my experience camping in various places, but only after I bought one. I see Roadtreks all the time now.
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Old 06-13-2019, 10:04 PM   #19
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Swarming with B's! I like it!
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Old 06-13-2019, 10:40 PM   #20
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We happened on this last month.

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