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Old 02-10-2019, 12:41 AM   #1
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Default All season class B?

Hello! Iím fairly new to the Rv world. All season class B is what sparked my interest, but Iím having troubles understanding what ďall seasonĒ really means. If such a class B exists that you can survive cold temparures in comfortably that would be incredible !
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Old 02-10-2019, 01:15 AM   #2
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Hello! Iím fairly new to the Rv world. All season class B is what sparked my interest, but Iím having troubles understanding what ďall seasonĒ really means. If such a class B exists that you can survive cold temparures in comfortably that would be incredible !
Welcome to the forum Denzel!

A 4-season rv is what you appear to suspect. One that is capable of camping in below freezing weather. It is difficult to assure an rv can actually do that, but it usually involves tanks and water lines that reside inside the occupied portion of the coach and thus are warmed by the rv heater. Sometimes, it includes tanks and lines that are external, but that are insulated or heated to prevent freezing. Again, to what low temperature this is effective, is the question.
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Old 02-10-2019, 05:41 AM   #3
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Are 4 Season RV’s fairly new to the market then?
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Old 02-10-2019, 11:09 AM   #4
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Are 4 Season RVís fairly new to the market then?
Pretty common in Europe and not as common over here.
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Old 02-10-2019, 11:15 AM   #5
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Waste tank size seems to be the biggest limiter to extended winter camping. Next would be the lack of open facilities to empty those tanks. Another issue is that the amount of fuel needed for heat would get costly if not plugged in.


Most folks just need enough winter capability to get from and through cold areas to somewhere warm.
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Old 02-10-2019, 11:41 AM   #6
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The most common approach in Europe is better insulation including double pane windows, internal fresh water tank, cassette toilet, internal or heated grey water tank, and integrated heat/hot water system (Truma, Alde, Webasto, Espar, etc.).

This approach is pretty straightforward and not especially expensive and could easily be done over here by if there was a big enough demand. Winter vacations into the cold seem to be more common in Europe.

4 season trailers and truck campers are more common over here and available from several manufactures. Once you go to larger RVs you do get more options for 4 season capability over here.
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Old 02-10-2019, 02:42 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by Denzel View Post
Hello! Iím fairly new to the Rv world. All season class B is what sparked my interest, but Iím having troubles understanding what ďall seasonĒ really means. If such a class B exists that you can survive cold temparures in comfortably that would be incredible !
'All Season' is whatever the manufacturer wants it to be, and for the owner, it's highly dependent on altitude and latitude.

To decide if you can survive the cold, you'll have to define 'cold'. There is quite a difference between freezing cold and -30f cold.

Dry camping or wet camping? Dry camping can be done at any habitable temperature. I'd be fine dry camping in my B at -10f or so. Any colder and it gets hard to use the outhouse.

Wet camping below freezing is harder. The plumbing has to stay above freezing.

Coachmen claims the Coachmen CrossFit is well insulated. On most models the fresh tank and plumbing are all inside & the black and grey are outside. On something like that, I'd be fine camping below freezing with fresh tank and hot water heater filled. I'd use RV fluid in the black and grey to keep them from freezing.
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Old 02-10-2019, 03:09 PM   #8
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'All Season' is whatever the manufacturer wants it to be, and for the owner, it's highly dependent on altitude and latitude.

To decide if you can survive the cold, you'll have to define 'cold'. There is quite a difference between freezing cold and -30f cold.

Dry camping or wet camping? Dry camping can be done at any habitable temperature. I'd be fine dry camping in my B at -10f or so. Any colder and it gets hard to use the outhouse.

Wet camping below freezing is harder. The plumbing has to stay above freezing.

Coachmen claims the Coachmen CrossFit is well insulated. On most models the fresh tank and plumbing are all inside & the black and grey are outside. On something like that, I'd be fine camping below freezing with fresh tank and hot water heater filled. I'd use RV fluid in the black and grey to keep them from freezing.
And shower drain p trap.

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Old 02-10-2019, 04:45 PM   #9
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'All Season' is whatever the manufacturer wants it to be, and for the owner, it's highly dependent on altitude and latitude.

To decide if you can survive the cold, you'll have to define 'cold'. There is quite a difference between freezing cold and -30f cold.

Dry camping or wet camping? Dry camping can be done at any habitable temperature. I'd be fine dry camping in my B at -10f or so. Any colder and it gets hard to use the outhouse.

Wet camping below freezing is harder. The plumbing has to stay above freezing.

Coachmen claims the Coachmen CrossFit is well insulated. On most models the fresh tank and plumbing are all inside & the black and grey are outside. On something like that, I'd be fine camping below freezing with fresh tank and hot water heater filled. I'd use RV fluid in the black and grey to keep them from freezing.
Thanks for the recommendation, Iíll check out the coachmen CrossFit. The cold tempatures would be comparable to living in North Dakota for example, from 0 to -30 Celsius. Basically depressing weather, lol.
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Old 02-10-2019, 05:36 PM   #10
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Thanks for the recommendation, Iíll check out the coachmen CrossFit. The cold tempatures would be comparable to living in North Dakota for example, from 0 to -30 Celsius. Basically depressing weather, lol.
I didn't check your location in your profile. No doubt your definition of 'cold' is cold.
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