Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-24-2018, 11:42 AM   #1
Bronze Member
 
valvegod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: MI
Posts: 20
Default 2018 Roadtrek 210 Dually Conversion.

Finally after 3 months of way to many hours of research and labor, I have completed the true dually and suspension conversion (11.5" axle) on our 2018 210. So far the handling and ride are drastically improved. Lifted 3" in front, and 2" in back. Added bonuses: No needed spare tire, park assist works, more pulling power, much higher load capacity, undercarriage clearance.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_7479.jpg (294.2 KB, 83 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_7480.jpg (286.8 KB, 74 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_7481.jpg (343.7 KB, 79 views)
__________________

valvegod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2018, 04:00 PM   #2
Platinum Member
 
mloganusda's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Smyrna, TN
Posts: 327
Default

What was your cost to convert? I am think along the same lines for my 2017 Trend for better weight carrying capacity. Right now the Trend is not able to carry full tank of fresh water as it overloads the passenger rear tire (10 ply). The Trend is front wheel drive so no drive shaft connection needed.
__________________

mloganusda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2018, 04:20 PM   #3
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 7,813
Default

What method did you use to lift the front? I ask because once you get around that 3" mark, if you do it with just springs and stock A arms, you are getting close to hitting the frame with upper arm on downtravel, unless you limit the downtravel to a pretty small amount with the shock length.
booster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2018, 10:16 PM   #4
Platinum Member
 
Boxster1971's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Maryland
Posts: 911
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by valvegod View Post
Finally after 3 months of way to many hours of research and labor, I have completed the true dually and suspension conversion (11.5" axle) on our 2018 210. So far the handling and ride are drastically improved. Lifted 3" in front, and 2" in back. Added bonuses: No needed spare tire, park assist works, more pulling power, much higher load capacity, undercarriage clearance.
Looks like a great upgrade. Too bad Roadtrek doesn't build them that way.
But I'm confused. Why do you think you no longer need a spare? How do you get more pulling power and higher load capacity? Did you replace the front suspension, spindles and rear axle?
__________________
2013 Airstream Interstate Lounge EXT on 2012 Sprinter 3500 170Ext
Formerly: 1973 Dodge B300 DIY pop-top conversion
Boxster1971 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2018, 03:14 AM   #5
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: CA
Posts: 1,610
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boxster1971 View Post
Looks like a great upgrade. Too bad Roadtrek doesn't build them that way.
But I'm confused. Why do you think you no longer need a spare? How do you get more pulling power and higher load capacity? Did you replace the front suspension, spindles and rear axle?
Presumably, the duals permit temporarily swapping a bad front tire with one of the rear wheels.

The load capacity is increased with four rear tires. I don't know how the duals themselves would increase pulling power which would seem more a function of the axle ratio employed.

For increasing load on a 210 , there is a less elegant but also less complicated way of accomplishing this which is to go to 7 inch rims and using a 265-75-16 tires which increases tire load capacity by almost 700 pounds. Axle capacity remains unchanged but I think the 60S Dana is quite capable of handling this load increase.
cruising7388 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2018, 04:18 AM   #6
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Arizona, Tempe
Posts: 629
Default

The plate appears to be Michigan. Must be an auto engineer to pull off such a fabulous mod so quickly. A little writeup with more detail would be really great.

Most of us take more time than that to lift the front end 3 inches and still get it wrong.
hbn7hj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2018, 09:33 PM   #7
Platinum Member
 
rowiebowie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,110
Default

Looks good. The main thing is you're satisfied with your modifications.

.
rowiebowie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2018, 02:29 AM   #8
Platinum Member
 
Boxster1971's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Maryland
Posts: 911
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cruising7388 View Post
Presumably, the duals permit temporarily swapping a bad front tire with one of the rear wheels.

The load capacity is increased with four rear tires. I don't know how the duals themselves would increase pulling power which would seem more a function of the axle ratio employed.

For increasing load on a 210 , there is a less elegant but also less complicated way of accomplishing this which is to go to 7 inch rims and using a 265-75-16 tires which increases tire load capacity by almost 700 pounds. Axle capacity remains unchanged but I think the 60S Dana is quite capable of handling this load increase.
Running with only a single tire on a dually will overload the tire. You could do it in an emergency but the tire would be ruined. It is not a good alternative to a spare. Also many folks have reported that roadside assistance would not make such a swap for them.

Load capacity does not increase by just adding tires. Depends on many factors like tire ratings as you noted. But axle rating is often the limiter. Load ratings are established by manufacturer and anything an owner does won't change it.

It would be good to hear the OP's answers since they made the changes and know the details of their van.
__________________
2013 Airstream Interstate Lounge EXT on 2012 Sprinter 3500 170Ext
Formerly: 1973 Dodge B300 DIY pop-top conversion
Boxster1971 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2018, 03:18 AM   #9
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Arizona, Tempe
Posts: 629
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boxster1971 View Post
Running with only a single tire on a dually will overload the tire. You could do it in an emergency but the tire would be ruined. It is not a good alternative to a spare. Also many folks have reported that roadside assistance would not make such a swap for them.
The van ran on one tire from the factory so it wouldn't overload the tire, assuming he was still within the original gross weight limit. I would certainly use it as a spare but would not bolt the flattened tire back on. Certainly get it fixed ASAP.
hbn7hj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2018, 03:43 AM   #10
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: CA
Posts: 1,610
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Boxster1971 View Post
Load capacity does not increase by just adding tires. Depends on many factors like tire ratings as you noted. But axle rating is often the limiter. Load ratings are established by manufacturer and anything an owner does won't change it.
There's no shortage of reports regarding rear tire failure from overloaded Chevys but what axle failures attributed to overload have been reported?

FWIW, the 60S axle rating is coincidentally 2X the 3042 lb E rated tire which prompts speculation that the 6084 lb axle rating assigned was more likely someone filling in the blanks rather than an engineering computation derived from a test bench.
cruising7388 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2018, 05:47 PM   #11
Platinum Member
 
Hondo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Colorado
Posts: 433
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hbn7hj View Post
The van ran on one tire from the factory so it wouldn't overload the tire, assuming he was still within the original gross weight limit. I would certainly use it as a spare but would not bolt the flattened tire back on. Certainly get it fixed ASAP.

That all depends on the tire's load rating.


There are many tires of OEM or dually size tires that will fit but are rated to carry less load. If two lower rated tires are mounted and then one removed the remaining single tire may not be able to handle the actual load now imposed upon it.


If the dually tires are rated to RT OEM load specs then one tire should be able to handle the published OEM load on it's own. The important thing is that the right tires get selected.
Hondo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2018, 06:24 PM   #12
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 44
Default

Valvegod, looks like a nice job with many improvements over stock. I have considered this a hundred times over the last 8 years. Are you able to say whether all parts are over the counter and approx cost and complexity?
hardybob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-30-2018, 08:57 PM   #13
Platinum Member
 
Boxster1971's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Maryland
Posts: 911
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hardybob View Post
Valvegod, looks like a nice job with many improvements over stock. I have considered this a hundred times over the last 8 years. Are you able to say whether all parts are over the counter and approx cost and complexity?
I agree this is a great improvement. It would be nice if OP, Valvegod could give us more information on the specific parts used to make this mod.
__________________
2013 Airstream Interstate Lounge EXT on 2012 Sprinter 3500 170Ext
Formerly: 1973 Dodge B300 DIY pop-top conversion
Boxster1971 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-31-2018, 03:37 AM   #14
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: California
Posts: 3
Default

I have been contemplating doing a dually conversion to my Chevy van for quite a while. It seems that physically mounting it is a straight forward job, and any dually rear end from a 2003-current cutaway van will fit. Disconnect driveshaft, disconnect brake lines, disconnect parking brake cable, disconnect speed sensors, undo 8 U-bolt nuts and roll the old one away.
Few issues come to mind and I am curious how the OP handled that.
1) Gear ratio. 2010+ gasoline Express vans come with 3.42 rear axle ratio, Duramax vans come with 3.54. However, the dually axles 2003-current come in either 3.73 or 4.10. G80 locking differential was optional on all of them. I wonder if the OP regeared his rear end, reprogrammed the computers, or just got used to the speedometer showing higher speed.
2) Stabilitrak. Dually rear ends do not have provisions for wheel speed sensors. ABS (and most likely Brake) light will remain on if sensors disconnected. One "hack" around this issue could be wiring the rear sensors in parallel with the front ones, to trick the EBCM into thinking the rear wheels are spinning at the same time as the front ones, but in slippery conditions that may cause ABS to perform odd.
3) TPMS is limited to 4 wheels, so the remaining two will need to be monitored separately. Dually trucks aren't required to have TPMS and thus don't come with it (I had a 2017 and it didn't).
ICkNonDRon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2019, 04:59 PM   #15
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: California
Posts: 3
Default

Would the OP answer answer those last questions please?..
ICkNonDRon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-24-2019, 06:16 PM   #16
Bronze Member
 
valvegod's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2018
Location: MI
Posts: 20
Default

Sorry never got a single notice on this thread that there was messages and not on this site much. Just started a new thread yesterday.
__________________

valvegod is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT. The time now is 09:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×