Class B Forums

Class B Forums (http://www.classbforum.com/forums/)
-   General Discussion Forum (http://www.classbforum.com/forums/f5/)
-   -   zero breeze small air conditioner (http://www.classbforum.com/forums/f5/zero-breeze-small-air-conditioner-9149.html)

gerrym51 05-06-2019 12:37 AM

zero breeze small air conditioner
 
does anyone have experience with this. It's 1100 btu's and it looks like it actually works.

again only 1100 btu's. it is NOT a swamp cooler

however in a small van with a couple of these might actually be effective. if just close up 2 people

remember in some ways you spend thousands of dollars just to get the ac you don't use often.

i've seen several videos on youtube about this. who knows

https://www.zerobreeze.com/collectio...12748365824102

Bruceper 05-07-2019 12:11 AM

$900US for 1100 BTU's? That's an insane price.

rowiebowie 05-07-2019 03:04 PM

You can't have too many btu's. I have a small class b that came from the factory with a 13.5K roof a/c which is already pretty large since most have 9K-11K. When I needed to replace it, the seller sent a 15K unit by mistake (same size and weight at the 13.5K unit).

My dilema was whether the 15K capacity would be too much. Based on advice from this and another forum, your dash air is anywhere from 20K-30K btu's so I kept the larger unit. Since the seller was willing to refund shipping, I installed the 15K.

It is quieter and uses 1 less amp than the old unit due to higher efficiency. I can report it is not too big. It can cool on even the hottest days (even though it still takes a while), yet it cycles off and on about like the old unit.

In conclusion, 1100 btu's should just be considered a nice cooling fan and not enough to cool an rv even minimally on any kind of hot day even if directly blowing on you. And at $900, that is more than I paid for the 15K btu Coleman Mach 8 Plus.
.

PinIN 05-07-2019 03:19 PM

I think it more for the DIY van people with limited battery capacity, obviously it not going to cool the B interior of a class B.

I could see it being used in an enclosed sleeping area.

People spend $1k on tiny refrigerators so the price is inline with those buyers.

avanti 05-07-2019 03:30 PM

Actually, you can have too many BTUs. A too-big a/c will run too-infrequently to humidity effectively. An ideal setup would just barely run continuously.

Obviously we are nowhere near that here

RossWilliams 05-07-2019 06:34 PM

I think its cooling ability depends on both the size of the space to be cooled AND the amount of insulation. For instance, if your goal is to keep a pet safe in hot weather, it may well be enough to cool a kennel space.

rowiebowie 05-07-2019 09:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by avanti (Post 93031)
Actually, you can have too many BTUs. A too-big a/c will run too-infrequently to humidity effectively. An ideal setup would just barely run continuously.

Obviously we are nowhere news that here

My point was a motor home does not act like a stick & brick house for which an a/c's capacity must be carefully matched to sq. ft., insulation, etc. in order to run enough to control humidity (in my part of the South, especially).

A motor home acts much more like a car due to solar heat gain through glass, poorer insulation, and body heat that adds to the interior warmth. Almost the instant your a/c dash air turns off, it starts to become warm. While a motor home isn't quite that bad, it is much closer to that than your home would be. And from my personal experience related in my first post, 15K in a tiny class b has not been a problem or seemed over-sized at all.

I don't think I've ever heard the complaint "Man, my dash air is just too cold." Thus far, I've not heard that complaint about motor home a/c either. Could it happen, sure, but it's unlikely. That's all I was saying. And I just don't think 1100 btu's would make enough difference to be worth considering, especially at that price.
.

gerrym51 05-08-2019 12:29 AM

with the class b i had the air conditioner could be too cold because of where the thermostat was.

It wasn't until i realized running a fan on the floor at the same time pointed up equalized the air in the van.

things improved and the a/c worked better

gerrym51 05-08-2019 12:32 AM

this guy actually took it apart and seems knowledgeable

he also posted on article


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8R3Gqm0LDU

booster 05-08-2019 12:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rowiebowie (Post 93039)
My point was a motor home does not act like a stick & brick house for which an a/c's capacity must be carefully matched to sq. ft., insulation, etc. in order to run enough to control humidity (in my part of the South, especially).

A motor home acts much more like a car due to solar heat gain through glass, poorer insulation, and body heat that adds to the interior warmth. Almost the instant your a/c dash air turns off, it starts to become warm. While a motor home isn't quite that bad, it is much closer to that than your home would be. And from my personal experience related in my first post, 15K in a tiny class b has not been a problem or seemed over-sized at all.

I don't think I've ever heard the complaint "Man, my dash air is just too cold." Thus far, I've not heard that complaint about motor home a/c either. Could it happen, sure, but it's unlikely. That's all I was saying. And I just don't think 1100 btu's would make enough difference to be worth considering, especially at that price.
.

We routinely turn up the temp control a little with the AC on in our Chevy Roadtrek, usually in high humidity, not extremely hot conditions. That way it runs more continuously by doesn't freeze us out of the front seats. We also will run it max AC in those conditions, or even dusty conditions, so it stays in recirc mode all the time.


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:31 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.