Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-24-2020, 04:19 PM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: CA
Posts: 4
Default Shore power problems

I was plugged into our home outlet with the A/C on, and suddenly stopped. I've checked the breaker switches and fuses -- they seem ok. I wonder if there is another breaker? or possible the separator?????

Thanks,
__________________

Murph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2020, 04:33 PM   #2
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: PHX, AZ
Posts: 1,570
Default

Hi and Welcome


make model year of RV?


you need to check that you are getting power from your home outlet- use a meter or a desk lamp to ensure that power is being supplied.


make sure nobody tripped over your cable



most RV's will have DC circuit breakers and AC circuit breakers internal to the van.
check that


mike
__________________

mkguitar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2020, 04:45 PM   #3
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Yucca Valley Ca
Posts: 48
Default

what breaker threw? the house of the van? I would cycle the breakers in question. push them all the way off(this will reset the breaker) and then push back to the on position.
__________________
1998 Dodge Xplorer 230
yvairguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2020, 04:53 PM   #4
Site Team
 
avanti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 4,066
Default

Some vans also have an extra dual breaker located inside the van near shore power point of entry.
__________________
Formerly: 2005 Airstream Interstate (Sprinter 2500 T1N)
Now!: 2014 Great West Vans Legend SE (Sprinter 3500 NCV3 I4)
avanti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2020, 05:26 PM   #5
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: CA
Posts: 4
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mkguitar View Post
Hi and Welcome


make model year of RV?


you need to check that you are getting power from your home outlet- use a meter or a desk lamp to ensure that power is being supplied.


make sure nobody tripped over your cable



most RV's will have DC circuit breakers and AC circuit breakers internal to the van.
check that


mike
2014 Roadtrek 210 P
Murph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2020, 05:27 PM   #6
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: CA
Posts: 4
Default

2014 Roadtrek 210 P
Murph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2020, 05:30 PM   #7
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2020
Location: CA
Posts: 4
Default

All breakers are good
Murph is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2020, 05:43 PM   #8
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Yucca Valley Ca
Posts: 48
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Murph View Post
All breakers are good
did you actually cycle the breaker? push it all the off then back on? 30+ years as an electrician and HVAC-R contractor and I can't tell you have many times I've gone out for a tripped breaker that they say wasn't.

Need more info. Is the plug on the house working? Does your AC have a GFI on the plug(some do some don't) some are hard wired some aren't.
__________________
1998 Dodge Xplorer 230
yvairguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2020, 05:48 PM   #9
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 9,116
Default

Most likely it is a 15 or 20 amp circuit in the house to the van? Depending on how it is wired that would also be on a ground fault that could be anywhere. Our outside ones were on a bathroom ground fault.


AC cycling the compressor very often will trip a non 30 amp circuit. Highly likely the problem in in the house. Plug something into the outside outlet and see if it works to test and if it doesn't go looking for the right breaker and/GFCI.
booster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2020, 02:06 AM   #10
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: MI
Posts: 25
Default

I just did this at my house and could find nothing wrong with my breakers either. Turns out I blew a breaker in the garage...right on one of the outlets. Just had to push the red button on the outlet an was back in business. BTW...it was not on the outlet I was plugged into.
AdamG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2020, 09:47 PM   #11
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Utah
Posts: 164
Default

The garage outlet that you pushed the button on is not a breaker, it is a ground fault detector. They are designed to shut down if any current is going to ground (like through you) they are frequently the first outlet from the breaker and other outlets cascaded then are protected as well.
For whatever reason on my MH it would trip the GF if I didn't use an adapter without a ground connection.
The best solution is a dedicated circuit for the MH.
Deano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2020, 04:21 AM   #12
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Location: MI
Posts: 25
Default

Interesting...all the cords used had a ground connection.
AdamG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2020, 12:48 PM   #13
Site Team
 
avanti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 4,066
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deano View Post
For whatever reason on my MH it would trip the GF if I didn't use an adapter without a ground connection.
Please don't do that. Ever.

Putting 120VAC shore power into an ungrounded vehicle is incredibly dangerous. A short to the chassis anywhere in the van, instead of tripping a breaker as it should, instead creates a "hot skin" condition which, among other things, has a strong tendency to kill innocent children. This is not theory--it happens.

Code requires ONE AND ONE ONLY bonding point. In the case of shore power, that point comes from the power pedestal. Believe it.
__________________
Formerly: 2005 Airstream Interstate (Sprinter 2500 T1N)
Now!: 2014 Great West Vans Legend SE (Sprinter 3500 NCV3 I4)
avanti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2020, 01:07 PM   #14
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 9,116
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by avanti View Post
Please don't do that. Ever.

Putting 120VAC shore power into an ungrounded vehicle is incredibly dangerous. A short to the chassis anywhere in the van, instead of tripping a breaker as it should, instead creates a "hot skin" condition which, among other things, has a strong tendency to kill innocent children. This is not theory--it happens.

Code requires ONE AND ONE ONLY bonding point. In the case of shore power, that point comes from the power pedestal. Believe it.

Yes, yes, yes, believe it and things that bounce down thousands of miles of roads are likely places to cause those shorts.


The comeback I often get is that when the generator or inverter are on you have 110v power to the van with no ground connection, and that is certainly true unless you drive a ground rod every time you camp and use the gen or inverter. The big difference is that the 110v power generated on board by those items is not earth ground referenced. It is only 110v between the power source hot and neutral/ground of the van. In most vans the ground is tied to the chassis and when the inverter or gen is on they should bond the neutral and ground so if you get an open on the neutral and ground you could get shocked between hot and the chassis. This is the same as getting shocked to a ground at home or touching a hot while standing in a puddle of water outside.



I have measured our chassis to earth ground a couple of times and I do get a few volts, but not much or harmful, when not plugged in and one inverter. I haven't specifically measured the hot on the van to earth ground, but I may do that today just for curiosity.
booster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2020, 07:55 PM   #15
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: Utah
Posts: 164
Default

I should have made a more through post.
I was NOT recommending not grounding the MH. I was just pointing out what happened with mine. Some years ago when I first posted about mine, some of you pointed out that apparently some MH builders bonded the ground to the neutral. This caused the house GFI to trip as it should because it detected current flowing in the ground circuit. My MH is one of these.

Our residences have the neutral and ground bonded in the main service panel and this is OK because the GFIs are inline between the bond and appliances.

"Murph" you can avoid your problem by connecting your MH to a circuit that is not GFI protected. However, you may still have a problem trying to run the A/C on a 15 or even a 20 amp circuit. If possible, install a 30 or 50 amp (depending on the MH requirements) service dedicated for your MH.

FYI, some circuit breakers incorporate GFIs in them, so you won't see GFI outlets on those circuits.
Deano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2020, 04:27 PM   #16
New Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: KY
Posts: 5
Default

Your RV probably needs a 30 amp connection, your home outlet is probably 15 or 20 amp. I had an electrician install a 30 amp service to the rear of my home so I can hook up my RV. Your RV electric outlets and some appliances can run on 15 or 20 amps. A/C needs 30.
KYRuss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2020, 04:49 PM   #17
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 9,116
Default

The OP's profile shows he has a Roadtrek 210P, but doesn't state the year.



If it is like many/most of the ones after about 2007 with a Tripplite inverter/charger, it will have a very high probability of tripping a ground fault outlet in the shore power line. Many owners have had that issue, and there in way around it except to use a non GFCI shore source. Codes nearly all require all 15 and 20 amp outlets that are outdoors or in a garage to be GFCI, so if you change the circuit to non GFCI, you would have a code violation and also incur some risks if you use it for normal everyday use.


Putting in a dedicated 30 amp circuit can get to be pretty expensive depending on where the outlet needs to be in relation to the existing wiring. It might actually be less expensive to replace the Tripplite.
booster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2020, 06:25 PM   #18
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2020
Location: MA
Posts: 54
Default

Check if you tripped a GFCI. Garage, basement, and outdoor outlets must be GFCI protected. If the outlet you plugged into is not a GFCI outlet than it may be wired to a GFCI somewhere else that could have tripped (this daisy chaining of GFCI protection is allowed by code). I have had this problem on occasion with both of my RVs when plugging into GFCI outlets.
__________________

jakegw2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT. The time now is 06:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×