Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-03-2017, 09:26 PM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Georgia
Posts: 17
Default Anyone out there who builds four season Class B vans?

Hi All,

I am seriously considering the purchase of a stealthy Class B to free myself from the chains that bound me.

I can't seem to find four season Class B vans and/or I'm just not seeing such details when I view manufacturer's websites.

I would think MOST places here, in my case, Atlanta GA area roughly +34 degrees latitude, get below freezing some portion of the year even if only at night. I could be wrong since I'm a newbie but wouldn't that mean most RVs would be rendered useless in cold weather & require winterizing, etc.? To me this severely limits their usefulness.

Can anyone point me toward a manufacturer who builds four season Class B RVs?

I saw the recent post about skiing. Me too! I haven't in more than 20 years and I want to have some fun rain or shine, warm or COLD!

Thanks,

Tony
__________________

TonyLuca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2017, 10:39 PM   #2
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: CA
Posts: 1,612
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by TonyLuca View Post
Hi All,

I am seriously considering the purchase of a stealthy Class B to free myself from the chains that bound me.

I can't seem to find four season Class B vans and/or I'm just not seeing such details when I view manufacturer's websites.

I would think MOST places here, in my case, Atlanta GA area roughly +34 degrees latitude, get below freezing some portion of the year even if only at night. I could be wrong since I'm a newbie but wouldn't that mean most RVs would be rendered useless in cold weather & require winterizing, etc.? To me this severely limits their usefulness.

Can anyone point me toward a manufacturer who builds four season Class B RVs?

I saw the recent post about skiing. Me too! I haven't in more than 20 years and I want to have some fun rain or shine, warm or COLD!

Thanks,

Tony
AFAIK, ARV is the only upfitter that provides total four season capability with a glycol heating system that protects everything - tanks and piping. I really don't understand the RV community tolerating this 3 season constraint that can make an expensive RV unusable for months out of the year.
__________________

cruising7388 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2017, 02:18 AM   #3
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 1,176
Default

It is not that difficult to use your van without water for a weekend or even a week. For years I drove back and forth from AZ to ND with no water. Flush the toilet with the pink antifreeze... and carry your drinking water. Easy to bathe with the adult bath wipes that they use in the nursing homes.

The heater works fine or like me, use a 12v mattress pad.

You guys are such wimps!!

(PS I have camped a few times where the temps got down below 25... with water on board... with no problems too. As long as it got warm during the day.)
__________________
Mumkin
2019 Roadtrek Simplicity SRT (almost a Zion)
2015 Roadtrek 170
2011 LTV Libero
2004 GWV Classic Supreme
mumkin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2017, 03:05 AM   #4
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,015
Default

if your willing to pay the price-ARV
gerrym51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2017, 03:59 AM   #5
Site Team
 
avanti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 3,495
Default

If you go with an Espar hydronic heating system, it is not that difficult to replicate the ARV freeze-protection scheme. I did so, described here:

http://www.classbforum.com/forums/f5...html#post61931
__________________
Formerly: 2005 Airstream Interstate (Sprinter 2500 T1N)
Now!: 2014 Great West Vans Legend SE (Sprinter 3500 NCV3 I4)
avanti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2017, 05:29 PM   #6
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 2,015
Default

a different idea is build a sportsmobile and have all systems in the van -nothing underneath-use a porta potti
gerrym51 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2017, 05:36 PM   #7
Platinum Member
 
Davydd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 4,698
Default

I've camped down to 0 degrees F. in our Advanced RV with water in the tanks. They are since building their Bs with more wintering capability down to minus 20 degrees F.

In the past two winters we camped at Tahquamenon Falls in Michigan's UP in January where Mike Wendland hosts a Winter Freezout. There had been 30 Class Bs, mostly Roadtreks, that have withstood 3-4 days in 2 foot snows and freezing temperatures. Most had winterized their tanks and electricity was available but all Class B types have withstood winter camping.
__________________
Davydd
2015 Advanced RV Ocean One Mercedes Benz Sprinter
Previous Class Bs:
2011 Great West Van Legend Sprinter
2005 Pleasure-way Plateau TS Sprinter
Davydd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2017, 05:39 PM   #8
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: New York
Posts: 133
Default

I think we all look for "four season use" to some extent and then deal with what we have.

Some will "Winterize" every time the temp goes down. That seems to be the common answer.

I keep fresh water in the fresh water tank year around (NY weather) and use a system that circulates hot water through all the water lines when the pipes get cold.
The water is heated while plugged in or with engine heat when driving.

So my criteria is that I want to be able to use my van (with water) any time. I do use the pink stuff with water to flush the john and in the gray tank so I do lose some capacity. I just don't like to have to winterize.

Keep looking for a system that will meet your requirements. I don't think there is a one size fits all.
DCHitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2017, 06:37 PM   #9
BBQ
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: East
Posts: 2,484
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DCHitt View Post
I think we all look for "four season use" to some extent and then deal with what we have.

Some will "Winterize" every time the temp goes down. That seems to be the common answer.

I keep fresh water in the fresh water tank year around (NY weather) and use a system that circulates hot water through all the water lines when the pipes get cold.
The water is heated while plugged in or with engine heat when driving.

So my criteria is that I want to be able to use my van (with water) any time. I do use the pink stuff with water to flush the john and in the gray tank so I do lose some capacity. I just don't like to have to winterize.

Keep looking for a system that will meet your requirements. I don't think there is a one size fits all.
Can you tell us more about your RV?
Is it a custom built?
Please start a new thread to showcase your RV.
We would love to see some pix.
__________________
BBQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-04-2017, 09:44 PM   #10
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: New York
Posts: 133
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BBQ View Post
Can you tell us more about your RV?
Is it a custom built?
Please start a new thread to showcase your RV.
We would love to see some pix.
My van is a Texas Sportsmobile. All the fresh water is on the drivers side and is above the floor. I call the antifreeze system an "Active RV Antifreeze System".

You can see the build at:
My new Promaster 3500, High Roof, Long body, Sportsmobile. - Sportsmobile Forum

I did talk with ARV about the antifreeze system but they went a different way.
DCHitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2017, 12:57 AM   #11
BBQ
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: East
Posts: 2,484
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DCHitt View Post
My van is a Texas Sportsmobile. All the fresh water is on the drivers side and is above the floor. I call the antifreeze system an "Active RV Antifreeze System".

You can see the build at:
My new Promaster 3500, High Roof, Long body, Sportsmobile. - Sportsmobile Forum

I did talk with ARV about the antifreeze system but they went a different way.

Interesting RV.

Definitely a well designed and executed RV.

Thanks for sharing.
__________________
BBQ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2017, 06:25 PM   #12
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 973
Default

There are some clever Sportsmobile builds. One I saw had a recirculation system that would take hot water, run it through pipes underneath, then dump it back in the FW tank. This would not just keep the floor warm, but keep the FW tank (which was inside the van) from freezing up.

It also depends on what you want the four season van for. If I were looking at something to go up to Colorado ski lodges and boondock there, I'd probably go for a 4x4 Sprinter with a diesel furnace and water heater.

For stealth camping in Atlanta, where A/C is a must, I'd look at a second alternator and an inverter, so you can pull power while the engine is running, which is far less obvious than a generator going.
mlts22 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2017, 12:35 PM   #13
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: ca
Posts: 11
Default

Skirting around the RV helps. One problem is moisture which leads to mold. The more you use a propane heater, cook, shower or even from breathing, the more moisture. So sufficient ventilation is important. Maybe have a humidity level gauge to monitor it. I wonder if you can plug in at a campsite and use a electric heater or two is really a better way to go vs running a propane heater.
pearll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2017, 04:50 PM   #14
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: New York
Posts: 133
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pearll View Post
Skirting around the RV helps. One problem is moisture which leads to mold. The more you use a propane heater, cook, shower or even from breathing, the more moisture. So sufficient ventilation is important. Maybe have a humidity level gauge to monitor it. I wonder if you can plug in at a campsite and use a electric heater or two is really a better way to go vs running a propane heater.
The standard forced air propane heater used in most RV's doesn't have a moisture problem because the flame box air input and output is to the outside. When the propane flame is on the inside it does put out lots of moisture but you also need ventilation because the O2 is being consumed.

I use a "safe" electric space heater when I am plugged in and staying in the van. I don't heat the van unless I am in it but I do have the "Active RV Antifreeze System" to keep the pipes from freezing. I don't want to waist heat heating an empty van just to keep the pipes from freezing and I also don't want to winterize.

When I am overnight and not plugged in I will idle the van engine to keep warm with the dash and rear engine coolant heaters. The dash heat brings in outside air and heats it so no moisture problems.

Different solutions but you do need to worry about condensation.
DCHitt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2019, 07:14 PM   #15
New Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: California
Posts: 1
Default Anyone builds a 4 season class B?

Hi! I have been searching for a looonng time and found what I wanted - until I discovered to “winterize” it meant to disconnect all water supplies, dump winter antifreeze in toilets, get extra heaters etc. SO frustrating. Somehow, I found the blog “wheeling it “ and check a post about European camper vans (10Ways European Motorhomes differ from US RVs). They are all winterized to -15C., have total insulation, double floor s, heated water and grey water holding tanks, total body insulation, double pane windows!! WHY, oh why, don’t North American manufacturers build some to European standards?!?! I have gotten my list to 3 camper vans and plan to buy in Europe (new vans are cheaper than No.American vans) and ship to the states. Maybe enough forum readers can contact their van manufacturers and request European standard vans! For example, Hymer vans built in Europe are to European standards but their US built Hymers are chintzy US type vans (cheaper quality but more expensive to purchase).
Rebecca.B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2019, 07:44 PM   #16
Site Team
 
avanti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 3,495
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebecca.B View Post
I have gotten my list to 3 camper vans and plan to buy in Europe (new vans are cheaper than No.American vans) and ship to the states.
As I understand it, it is virtually impossible to legally import a euro-spec vehicle into the US and get it titled.
__________________
Formerly: 2005 Airstream Interstate (Sprinter 2500 T1N)
Now!: 2014 Great West Vans Legend SE (Sprinter 3500 NCV3 I4)
avanti is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2019, 08:08 PM   #17
Platinum Member
 
DUTCH in Atlanta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Georgia
Posts: 111
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by avanti View Post
As I understand it, it is virtually impossible to legally import a euro-spec vehicle into the US and get it titled.
It can be done, but the cost of Federalization (modifying to US standards) will be extremely expensive - probably US$40k-US$50k at least.
DUTCH in Atlanta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2019, 08:53 PM   #18
Platinum Member
 
DUTCH in Atlanta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: Georgia
Posts: 111
Default

Coachmen Galleria has a "Polar Package Plus Tank Heating System" Option that protects down to 5°F.
DUTCH in Atlanta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2019, 09:01 PM   #19
Bronze Member
 
Santiago's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2018
Location: CA
Posts: 30
Default

In Europe, the B class builders use the same chassis we have here. Find yourself an outfitter give him the specs and your B van will match or exceed what they have in Europe. It's rather easy and low cost to accomplish when you come to think of it.

Another reason many build their own.

Santiago
__________________
2018 RAM Promaster 159" V6 gas - self build underway.
Santiago is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2019, 09:11 PM   #20
Site Team
 
avanti's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 3,495
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Santiago View Post
In Europe, the B class builders use the same chassis we have here. Find yourself an outfitter give him the specs and your B van will match or exceed what they have in Europe.
Have you ever lived in a quality European RV? The best of them are actual, designed, engineered, and manufactured PRODUCTS, with properly-manufactured fittings and structural modules. I wish what you say were true, but the sad fact is that ALL American RVs are essentially built piece-by-piece by carpenters (at best assisted by NC milling machines). This is especially true of the "one off" upfitters. ARV comes closest the European quality, but even they can come across more like craftsman projects than manufactured products.

I would buy a European RV in a heartbeat if it were remotely practical, but alas, it is not.
__________________

__________________
Formerly: 2005 Airstream Interstate (Sprinter 2500 T1N)
Now!: 2014 Great West Vans Legend SE (Sprinter 3500 NCV3 I4)
avanti is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT. The time now is 02:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×