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Old 02-10-2020, 08:14 PM   #1
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Hi all, thanks to all of you who have responded to my last post, I need 4 tires for my 2011 Pleasureway Lexor.
Looking on line is very confusing to me as I have no experience of selecting new tires, I would like to stay away from the many "Box stores" around, I stopped by my local tire guy who is highly regarded here in Sonoma Ca, he has been in business for years, we had a long chat and he is suggesting Cooper tires DiscovererHT3 LT265/75R16 LRE123/120R Blk, $900 for 4 tires installed.
Does any one have any experience, good or bad things to say about these tires
Thanks in advance.
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Old 02-10-2020, 08:23 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by rpns51 View Post
Hi all, thanks to all of you who have responded to my last post, I need 4 tires for my 2011 Pleasureway Lexor.
Looking on line is very confusing to me as I have no experience of selecting new tires, I would like to stay away from the many "Box stores" around, I stopped by my local tire guy who is highly regarded here in Sonoma Ca, he has been in business for years, we had a long chat and he is suggesting Cooper tires DiscovererHT3 LT265/75R16 LRE123/120R Blk, $900 for 4 tires installed.
Does any one have any experience, good or bad things to say about these tires
Thanks in advance.

I am pretty sure the 2011 Lexor is on a Chevy 3500 chassis.


The stock tire was a 245-75-16 tire and the factory wheel at 6.5" wide and 28mm positive offset. If it has the factory wheels (steel 5 openings) the 265 tire is too big for the rim width.


If the van has aftermarket aluminum wheels on it, it is highly likely they are at zero offset. Most will be wide enough for the 265 tire, but the wrong offset moves the tire fore and aft as it turns, so might have clearance issues in tight turning. A 265 tire will fit in the Chevies with the right offset wheels, as quite a few of us have done it. Some have gotten by with the aluminum wheels also and bigger tires, but I wouldn't count on it if, as other factors come in also.


Beyond that, most tend to choose the Michelin tires, which have been Defenders until very recently. The drive very, very well, but age poorly in many cases. Now the Michelin is the Agilles, which is getting good reviews, but very limited data so far on that.
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Old 02-16-2020, 04:09 PM   #3
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Save half of the price of the Coopers. Go to Costco and get their Michelins. Bought 4 three years ago, have over 60,000 miles on them and still going strong. You won’t be sorry. We drive a Roadtrek RS Adventurous.
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Old 02-16-2020, 04:12 PM   #4
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I have had great luck with Bridgestone Dueler light truck tires on our RT 210 with an 8600lb gross weight. Just make sure to keep them at the correct tire pressures and, as Booster mentioned, stick with a stock size tire. There should be a sticker inside your driver's door (or some where) showing the recommended tire size.
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Old 02-16-2020, 04:29 PM   #5
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I'm not a fan of the Coopers. I have a set on now installed a couple of years ago, $700 OTD for the 245's. They are a bit loud and also prone to pick up and not release pebbles on the front. The rear tires shed the pebbles just fine. Thinking it has a lot to do with the weight, or lack of, on them.

They do seem to wear and handle nicely.

If Les Schwab is in your area it wouldn't hurt to check them out. I've heard good things but have no direct experience.

Do stay away from the cheapo China junk goof ball brand names. BTDT. I lost both rears, they apparently don't like running at full load. Pressures were good as I had a TPMS on them.
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Old 02-16-2020, 05:28 PM   #6
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Go with Michelin, there's about a $60 difference in price. Be thankful you dont need 7 new tires (dually rears + spare). I'm continually amazed how well over time their light truck tires resist abuse.
YMMV ✌
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Old 02-16-2020, 05:30 PM   #7
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We have always used Michelins on our vans and have been very satisfied with them. Instead of inflating the tires to the "sticker" values on the door jamb we weighed the van (fully wet) at a truck stop getting the weight on each axle and then set the pressures to the values recommended by Michelin. The ride was much improved!
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Old 02-16-2020, 06:29 PM   #8
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We have always used Michelins on our vans and have been very satisfied with them. Instead of inflating the tires to the "sticker" values on the door jamb we weighed the van (fully wet) at a truck stop getting the weight on each axle and then set the pressures to the values recommended by Michelin. The ride was much improved!
Jim

Welcome to the forum Jim!


Where did you get the "Michelin values"? Max psi on the sidewall?

You need to ensure they are capable of handling the loads your rig is carrying. Most here use the rv manufacturers sticker, then tinker with the front inflation buy upping 5-10 psi to get the best combination of ride/handling (still staying well under max psi on tire sidewall on the front).

At lot of us have had our loaded rigs weighed on CAT Scales to ensure we don't exceed chassis GVW and tire load ratings.
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Old 02-16-2020, 07:54 PM   #9
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I run my tires at the maximum psi as shown on the side wall. I have not had a problem in 50 years, that was not my fault.
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Old 02-16-2020, 09:56 PM   #10
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I used the Michelin Inflation Charts at https://www.michelintruck.com/michel...-inflation.pdf. At the CAT scale we measured 3400 lbs on the front axle and 3840 lbs on the rear axle. For those weights the tire chart shows a front pressure of 42 psi and 50 for the rear. I add about 15% for a safety factor yielding 50 psi for the front and 60 psi for the rear. The sticker values are 55 and 80. The ride is very much improved!
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Old 02-17-2020, 12:10 AM   #11
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I used the Michelin Inflation Charts at https://www.michelintruck.com/michel...-inflation.pdf. At the CAT scale we measured 3400 lbs on the front axle and 3840 lbs on the rear axle. For those weights the tire chart shows a front pressure of 42 psi and 50 for the rear. I add about 15% for a safety factor yielding 50 psi for the front and 60 psi for the rear. The sticker values are 55 and 80. The ride is very much improved!
Jim
Sounds like you're doing it right and informed. I was not aware of the michelin site info.

Your weights a pretty light compared to mine since I'm about a 1,000 more than you on both axles (Chevy Express 3500 chasisi). For that reason I run the full recommeded 80psi rear. On the front, the recommedation of 50psi is pretty marginal so I run 55-60 there. But again, different situation than you.
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Old 02-19-2020, 10:20 PM   #12
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We have used both Michelin tires and Bridgestone tires on our 2004 Roadtrek 190.
I like the Michelins better although we put nearly equal miles on both manufacturers
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Old 02-19-2020, 10:27 PM   #13
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An issue with lowering the tire pressure is that the TPMS indicator comes on! I lowered the TPMS trigger points using FORScan and all is well.
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Old 02-20-2020, 12:02 AM   #14
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Has anyone bought Les Schwab tires for there RV I purchase our car tires from there. I was looking to buy there LT245/75R-16/10 120 Back City HT tires for my 2000 Dodge RT 190 Popular. There are Michelin XPS Rib tires on the RV now same size.
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Old 02-20-2020, 03:34 AM   #15
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The Firestone Destination HT's on my van when I bought it rode just as smooth, handled just as well, and got almost 1 mpg better than the Michelin Defenders I replaced them with. Their problem was fairly severe sidewall cracking (worst near the bead) in their third year. Never run low on pressure an no blowouts, but I replaced them as a precaution even though they had deep tread left.

I got one of the last sets of Michelin Defenders. Had I not gotten them, I might have taken a chance on another set of Firestone Destinations, which are now replaced by a revised version.
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Old 02-20-2020, 02:21 PM   #16
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Costco Michelin, unless you have dual wheels.... Costco doesn't do valve extensions.
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Old 02-27-2020, 01:53 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by booster View Post
I am pretty sure the 2011 Lexor is on a Chevy 3500 chassis.


The stock tire was a 245-75-16 tire and the factory wheel at 6.5" wide and 28mm positive offset. If it has the factory wheels (steel 5 openings) the 265 tire is too big for the rim width.


If the van has aftermarket aluminum wheels on it, it is highly likely they are at zero offset. Most will be wide enough for the 265 tire, but the wrong offset moves the tire fore and aft as it turns, so might have clearance issues in tight turning. A 265 tire will fit in the Chevies with the right offset wheels, as quite a few of us have done it. Some have gotten by with the aluminum wheels also and bigger tires, but I wouldn't count on it if, as other factors come in also.


Beyond that, most tend to choose the Michelin tires, which have been Defenders until very recently. The drive very, very well, but age poorly in many cases. Now the Michelin is the Agilles, which is getting good reviews, but very limited data so far on that.
Yep, I have Michelins...very good tires, are great on the road and even in rain!!
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