Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-15-2019, 04:11 PM   #1
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Vivian Louisiana
Posts: 85
Default Class B Van RV ok to tow 2019 Jeep JL

I am looking to purchase a 2000 or so Class B camper van, in the near future.

Will the above safely tow a 2019 Jeep JL 2 door weighing just under 4000 LB?

Thanks
__________________

k1hog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2019, 10:44 PM   #2
Platinum Member
 
markopolo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 8,361
Default

Some B vans could tow that.

For a loaded down Class B van from 2000, a very quick calculation would be to subtract the GVWR from the GCWR.

Example: a 2000 Chevy or GMC 1 ton van (3500) with the 7.4L Vortec and a 4:10 rear: 17,000 GCWR - 9,500 GVWR = 7,500 lbs towing! A 2000 5.7L Vortec with the 4:10 rear: 13,500 GCWR - 9,500 GVWR = 4,000 lbs.
__________________

__________________
Two bikes on sliding cargo box: https://www.classbforum.com/forums/m...icture206.html & 1997 GMC Savana 6.5L Turbo Diesel Custom Camper Van Specifications: https://www.classbforum.com/forums/f...vana-5864.html
markopolo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2019, 02:11 PM   #3
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: America's Seaplane City, FL
Posts: 583
Default

That era of Dodge one tons will also apparently work but I would try to find one the the 5.8 or 360 engine. My brother flat tows a Chevy Tracker behind his '93 Dodge with the 318 engine. It weighs about 2500lbs. IT works, but again, tough when pulling mountain grades and he had to add mods to mitigate transmission temps. He is not sure that he is there yet, but getting closer.

I have a 2000 Chevy 200 Versatile that I pull an enclosed motorcycle trailer with. The loaded trailer is at 2500lbs. Pulling mountain(steep hill) grades does get it working, and quickly builds transmission heat. A good, new, compatible synthetic fluid flush would be advised. A transmission temperature gauge would be highly desired, I think mandatory. Transmissions are not cheap. I've found that even in AR I have to watch the trans temp, let alone the long grades out west. I would assume your higher tail weight would aggravate the situation. Obviously, a braking system for the Jeep would be mandatory. My Chevy does have the factory auxiliary trans cooler on it along with a pusher electric fan on it. The larger Chevy engine does have the thicker radiator so that would help. Booster has installed one and likes what it does, but it isn't a cure all for trans heat. He has done a lot of mods on his Chevy to mitigate trans heat. Do a search on this forum for his write ups. Awesome stuff with good data.
__________________
2000 Roadtrek Chevy 200 Versatile
Fun stuff:
'15 Kawasaki Versys650LT
'98 Kawasaki KLR650
SteveJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2019, 06:41 PM   #4
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: WA
Posts: 33
Default

The answer is yes but you probably won't enjoy it. We have an '01 Roadtrek 200 on a Chevy 3500 chassis with the 454 engine, Bilstein shocks and a steering damper. We have towed several cars with it. The heaviest was a Grand Cherokee, currently a CR-V. The towed vehicle pushes and pulls the van considerably, resisting turn initiation and then resisting straightening out. And then there's the van and the tow trying to do their own things when rut tracking or being buffeted by side winds. A lighter towed vehicle would be better but that is constrained by what is available and what you want to do with it.
rtbill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2019, 12:35 PM   #5
New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Virginia
Posts: 16
Default

You would need to review the rated weight and towing capacity of the specific vehicle model you're looking at. We've been towing our 2-door Wrangler behind our MB 3500 Sprinter for years and never had a problem. As they say, we don't even know it's back there.
MarCorpsMustang is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2019, 03:33 PM   #6
Platinum Member
 
engnrsrule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: VA
Posts: 127
Default

Our 2006 Dodge (MB) Sprinter has a 5000 tow rating and we pull a 2005 Subaru Forester (GVW 3200 lbs). It tows like its not even there. Just have to remember I'm 38 ft instead of 22!
engnrsrule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2019, 06:49 PM   #7
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: CA
Posts: 1,220
Default That's because it's a diesel engine..

Quote:
Originally Posted by MarCorpsMustang View Post
You would need to review the rated weight and towing capacity of the specific vehicle model you're looking at. We've been towing our 2-door Wrangler behind our MB 3500 Sprinter for years and never had a problem. As they say, we don't even know it's back there.
I don't know WHY anyone needs a tow vehicle behind a Class B??? But, towing with a diesel is going to make a big difference... certainly more low end torque.,.

Also, the weight of the 3500 Sprinter with the dual wheels, which is what I presume you have, is going to be a much more stable platform.

Just be aware that anything you're towing has to be within the maximum weight capacity of the vehicle overall... which means you might have to reduce the cargo in the van....

Always lighter is better...... and going uphills is going to be more taxing on the vehicle and your fuel consumption.....

I don't recommend towing, period.... many other people have made good points about wind, and even unstable road conditions can cause issues....Plus, it's a lot of extra length..... to deal with....

Why do you think you need an extra vehicle with a Class B..? I can see if you were driving a 40 foot motor home....

Just drive your Class B RV anywhere you need to go.... it's approximately 1 1/2 the length of a large SUV...
Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2019, 06:51 PM   #8
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: CA
Posts: 1,220
Default The big question is "safely"..

Quote:
Originally Posted by k1hog View Post
I am looking to purchase a 2000 or so Class B camper van, in the near future.

Will the above safely tow a 2019 Jeep JL 2 door weighing just under 4000 LB?

Thanks
My advice is to just skip this.... Drive your Class B anywhere you need to go.... keep it simple.
Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2019, 07:40 PM   #9
Platinum Member
 
engnrsrule's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: VA
Posts: 127
Default The case for pulling a Toad with a Class B

We started out just taking the RV on a few trips and still do, depending. While 22' is able to go most places a car or SUV can go, it is still a lot of vehicle to park, and 9'6" height is a limit too. In a town or city street parking needs 2 spaces and 2 meters. Then there is hookups, plus mob/demob of awning, furniture, doormats, it adds 30 min to pulling in or out. Class B storage is at a premium, so a Toad provides space for golf clubs, fishing gear or other items. Despite its size the RT only seats 4, so the car is a help if we are meeting others...Best part of having a Toad is coming back from a long day of activities and having everything ready to cook, relax, or hit the hay.
engnrsrule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2019, 08:29 PM   #10
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 545
Default

In addition to the reasons already mentioned, there are places you can't go with a low clearance, 170 inch wheelbase vehicle. Then there is the same reason families have more than one car, people can head off in different directions.We have considered using a toad to carry kayaks - the toad would have more uses than a trailer for that purpose. I think there are all sorts of specific situations where you might want a separate vehicle. The question is whether its worth the cost and hassle.
RossWilliams is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2020, 04:17 PM   #11
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: California
Posts: 7
Default This!

Quote:
Originally Posted by engnrsrule View Post
We started out just taking the RV on a few trips and still do, depending. While 22' is able to go most places a car or SUV can go, it is still a lot of vehicle to park, and 9'6" height is a limit too. In a town or city street parking needs 2 spaces and 2 meters. Then there is hookups, plus mob/demob of awning, furniture, doormats, it adds 30 min to pulling in or out. Class B storage is at a premium, so a Toad provides space for golf clubs, fishing gear or other items. Despite its size the RT only seats 4, so the car is a help if we are meeting others...Best part of having a Toad is coming back from a long day of activities and having everything ready to cook, relax, or hit the hay.
I haven't set up my jeep TJ for towing, yet. But, I've been looking into it mainly for these same reasons, mostly the hookups. If you are at an RV park and have the canopy deployed as well as the water/sewer/electric/cable all hooked up, it's a pain to disconnect and pack up to run out for a while, then come back and reconnect. It's too easy to just blow it off and hang out at the RV park. So, while the class B is technically able to be driven most places, it isn't always convenient. If you are boondocking, or only have minimal connections, then it's a different story. Even then, if you know you will be driving, you start to question whether it's worth it to deploy the canopy. Maybe you would call me lazy... but it's vacation!
MarkS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2020, 02:40 AM   #12
Joe
Platinum Member
 
Joe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 152
Send a message via AIM to Joe
Default Joe

I was taking 2 bikes in a hitch mounted bike rack. But we started staying on road and camping longer. Staying 2 to 3
Months at a time in campgrounds. So I got a small motorcycle type trailer to tow for extra storage. We now wish to take the bikes again on extended stays and the trailer. Don't really want to mount bikes on front of camper. My spare tire is on back center of camper. Was thinking about a spare tire bike mount so can take bikes and little trailer. I have a 1995 Dodge Class B Xplorer camper. Any ideas or think this will work?
Joe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2020, 01:16 PM   #13
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Vivian Louisiana
Posts: 85
Default

Thanks all for the input, have just about decided to abandoned towing the Jeep, was never my preferred toed, as we have two 125cc scooters that we tow on a small trailer. The trailer is just big enough for the scooters, with a little room left over.
Joe as far as your towing the bikes and a small motorcycle trailer, depending on the tung weight of the trailer you could us a receiver hitch bike rack that would allow you to tow the motorcycle trailer. You would need to pay special attention to the length on the receiver bar and the tung weight. Maybe others will advise on this.

Johnnie
k1hog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2020, 05:08 PM   #14
Platinum Member
 
BillsPaseo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: WA
Posts: 191
Default

We tow this 5x8 v-nose cargo trailer behind our van. Weighs about 2000 lbs with our two dual sport motorcycles, riding gear, etc. About 800 lbs empty. It is a good bit lower than the roof of the van, and at the fenders is just a few inches narrower than the van, quite a bit narrower at the box, so it tucks in really nicely behind it. Very easy to tow, and only drops our gas mileage about 1.5 mpg.

It is about at the limit of what I'm willing to tow with the Paseo. When loaded up for a trip, the van weighs about 9800 lbs, and it has a 10360 GVWR and 12500 GCVWR. So we're under the max, but only by about 500-700 lbs. Because of this, we went with a trailer that has brakes, even though they legally are not required if the weight is under 3000 lbs. Adding brakes means our trailer has a GVWR of 3500 lbs instead of the standard 2950, but we'll never actually need that extra weight carrying capacity.

The van GCVWR is what will get you when towing a vehicle. Most class B's don't really have much towing capacity left because they are already pushing their GVWR limit. The vehicle manufacturer's tow ratings generally are calculated as GCVWR minus the curb weight when it left the factory. Problem is that then the RV manufacturer adds a couple thousand lbs in the RV build out. So if Ford/Ram/Mercedes/etc says it can tow 5000 lbs, by the time you get it from Winnebago/Coachmen/Roadtrek/etc, you really only have 3000 or less capability. Now load it up with passengers, water, propane, etc, and you're likely down to more like 2000 lbs.



__________________
2017 Winnebago Paseo
BillsPaseo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2020, 10:16 PM   #15
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Ohio
Posts: 44
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by k1hog View Post
I am looking to purchase a 2000 or so Class B camper van, in the near future.

Will the above safely tow a 2019 Jeep JL 2 door weighing just under 4000 LB?

Thanks
If you don't call your car a toad you haven't been dragging it long enough. If you say you are towing you haven't been for long enough. It's a toad. You are toading.

These are different cars but that is the point I am making. No two cars toad the same.

I toad a 3000 pound '79 CJ-5 all over behind a 34 foot Winnie and never liked it. Toading my old 2800 pound '96 Saturn wagon was a breeze. Toading my current 2600 pound Mini Cooper S is a breeze. Dragging my last 5000 pound Caddy SRX was friggin' horrible.

Dragging that Jeep was quite different and not in a good way. But it had to be done cause there was a hundred or so miles of Outer Banks beach that was callin'!

No two cars toad the same.

73,
W8IZ
SteveWolf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2020, 01:28 AM   #16
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: America's Seaplane City, FL
Posts: 583
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillsPaseo View Post
We tow this 5x8 v-nose cargo trailer behind our van. Weighs about 2000 lbs with our two dual sport motorcycles, riding gear, etc. About 800 lbs empty. It is a good bit lower than the roof of the van, and at the fenders is just a few inches narrower than the van, quite a bit narrower at the box, so it tucks in really nicely behind it. Very easy to tow, and only drops our gas mileage about 1.5 mpg.

It is about at the limit of what I'm willing to tow with the Paseo. When loaded up for a trip, the van weighs about 9800 lbs, and it has a 10360 GVWR and 12500 GCVWR. So we're under the max, but only by about 500-700 lbs. Because of this, we went with a trailer that has brakes, even though they legally are not required if the weight is under 3000 lbs. Adding brakes means our trailer has a GVWR of 3500 lbs instead of the standard 2950, but we'll never actually need that extra weight carrying capacity.

The van GCVWR is what will get you when towing a vehicle. Most class B's don't really have much towing capacity left because they are already pushing their GVWR limit. The vehicle manufacturer's tow ratings generally are calculated as GCVWR minus the curb weight when it left the factory. Problem is that then the RV manufacturer adds a couple thousand lbs in the RV build out. So if Ford/Ram/Mercedes/etc says it can tow 5000 lbs, by the time you get it from Winnebago/Coachmen/Roadtrek/etc, you really only have 3000 or less capability. Now load it up with passengers, water, propane, etc, and you're likely down to more like 2000 lbs.



I like that trailer. I have a 6x10 rounded flat front that I pull behind a y2k FT 200 Versatile. It's OK unless fighting the wind, then it can get tough to pull and the MPG goes in the tank.

I've given some thought to something similar to yours but I am concerned about the tongue weight with the axle so far back.

Have you weighed the tongue when loaded?
__________________
2000 Roadtrek Chevy 200 Versatile
Fun stuff:
'15 Kawasaki Versys650LT
'98 Kawasaki KLR650
SteveJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2020, 02:41 AM   #17
Platinum Member
 
BillsPaseo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: WA
Posts: 191
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveJ View Post
I like that trailer. I have a 6x10 rounded flat front that I pull behind a y2k FT 200 Versatile. It's OK unless fighting the wind, then it can get tough to pull and the MPG goes in the tank.

I've given some thought to something similar to yours but I am concerned about the tongue weight with the axle so far back.

Have you weighed the tongue when loaded?
Thanks! We do have to watch the tongue weight with the axle that far back. It is about 8 inches farther back than the trailer we had before, and it is definitely heavier. I haven't weighed it yet (just got it back at the end of October), but did the manual attempt to lift off the hitch to see if I could budge it the one time I had it loaded up since we got it. I'd guess it was about 250 lbs. I will need to weigh it.

To compensate for the set back axle, we put our two 5 gallon gas cans at the very back, and I have the Pitbull trailer restraints mounted where the back tires of the bikes are just inches from the rear door, which puts rear wheel weight just slightly behind the axle. And my tool box goes on one side directly over the axle, and the Viair air compressor on the other side. Up front on the shelves is our fairly light weight but bulky riding gear. And the fairly heavy spare tire, but anywhere else and it would be too much in the way given how small the trailer is.

The van's hitch dropped less than half an inch from the weight, so I'm not too worried about it. A little too heavy is better than too light as long as you don't go over the tow vehicle's hitch capacity.

An advantage to the set back axle is ease of backing up. This trailer is significantly less susceptible to jack-knifing than the old one. It is really nice to be able to back it into its storage spot with the van. With the old trailer, I would pull into the driveway and unhitch, and then use my tractor to maneuver the trailer back to where it goes.
__________________
2017 Winnebago Paseo
BillsPaseo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2020, 01:16 PM   #18
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: America's Seaplane City, FL
Posts: 583
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillsPaseo View Post
Thanks! We do have to watch the tongue weight with the axle that far back. It is about 8 inches farther back than the trailer we had before, and it is definitely heavier. I haven't weighed it yet (just got it back at the end of October), but did the manual attempt to lift off the hitch to see if I could budge it the one time I had it loaded up since we got it. I'd guess it was about 250 lbs. I will need to weigh it.

To compensate for the set back axle, we put our two 5 gallon gas cans at the very back, and I have the Pitbull trailer restraints mounted where the back tires of the bikes are just inches from the rear door, which puts rear wheel weight just slightly behind the axle. And my tool box goes on one side directly over the axle, and the Viair air compressor on the other side. Up front on the shelves is our fairly light weight but bulky riding gear. And the fairly heavy spare tire, but anywhere else and it would be too much in the way given how small the trailer is.

The van's hitch dropped less than half an inch from the weight, so I'm not too worried about it. A little too heavy is better than too light as long as you don't go over the tow vehicle's hitch capacity.

An advantage to the set back axle is ease of backing up. This trailer is significantly less susceptible to jack-knifing than the old one. It is really nice to be able to back it into its storage spot with the van. With the old trailer, I would pull into the driveway and unhitch, and then use my tractor to maneuver the trailer back to where it goes.
Thanks for the info and comeback.
__________________
2000 Roadtrek Chevy 200 Versatile
Fun stuff:
'15 Kawasaki Versys650LT
'98 Kawasaki KLR650
SteveJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2020, 01:35 PM   #19
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 8,767
Default

Quote:
If you don't call your car a toad you haven't been dragging it long enough. If you say you are towing you haven't been for long enough. It's a toad. You are toading
I got a lecture from a towing hitch shop on the "toad" term once a long time ago.

This place claimed the proper spelling is "towed", not toed, not toad, as in an abbreviated version of "towed vehicle".
booster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2020, 05:10 PM   #20
Joe
Platinum Member
 
Joe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 152
Send a message via AIM to Joe
Default

I have seen two Class B campers flat tow cars. Not sure what make but I ask owners about it. They said certain cars cane be flat towed. I know vehicles with transfer cases can be like your Jeep. A car might be lighter. I have a adapter receiver that has 2 receivers on it. I hooked trailer and bike rack in. But together the rig looked to long and moved a lot. I just ordered the spare mount bike rack. Going to see if enough clearance between trailer and bike tires. Thanks for input.
__________________

Joe is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT. The time now is 08:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×