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Old 05-09-2020, 12:22 PM   #1
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Default Tire Pressure to the MAX

I have a 2004 RT 200P, the door sticker states:

80 PSI Rear

50 PSI Front

Is it best to air the tires to the max air pressure?

Thanks

Johnnie
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Old 05-09-2020, 01:50 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by k1hog View Post
I have a 2004 RT 200P, the door sticker states:

80 PSI Rear

50 PSI Front

Is it best to air the tires to the max air pressure?

Thanks

Johnnie

As far as I know, max is what it says - just the max recommended pressure for the tire and not necessarily the best pressure for your application!

I believe that the tire pressure you use should be the pressure recommended for the load you actually have on the tires - as determined by weighing the vehicle loaded as normal. Tire companies normally provide charts of load versus recommended pressure up the the capacity of their particular tires and that is what should be used.

Hopefully the pressures on the doorplate are determined by the dry wt on the tires as measured by the RV manufacturer, together with an assumption of the typical payload - including people, water etc.

Ideal would be to weigh your actual vehicle loaded as for normal travel, then pick the tire pressure for that load from the tore manfacturers specs.

Failing that, I think you should go with the recommendation on the door plate.

I am not aware that there is harm in using the max rating, but tires would be stiffer than needed, p erhaps give a rougher ride, and the suspension might not be optimised for the vehicle.

Just my thoughts, and certainly I stand to be corrected by anyone with more specific expertise on tires!

Brian.
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Old 05-09-2020, 02:37 PM   #3
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Johnnie, there are a lot of different opinions of this much discussed question of tire pressure. You can run a search of old threads on this forum and probably find a whole lot of useful information.

Personally, on our 2007 RT 210P I run 60 front and 75 rear. I have found over the years that those pressures work well for us for the quality of ride and I have never had a tire problem in so doing. Also, I might add, I reduce the pressure slightly in the summer months. Traveling down an Interstate in this part of the country in July or August with an ambient temperature above 100F will really cause your tires to pick up some additional pressure.

Just my own way and observations and many folks, I am sure, will not agree. Some use a very precise approach to this question and some of us just go by personal experiences over decades of having small motorhomes. I read all the specs, tech stuff and adjust for my personal experiences and preferences.

Paul
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Old 05-09-2020, 02:56 PM   #4
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Is the tire pressure sticker from the van manufacturer or the converter? I would have to go with a converter's recommendation because they weigh their work (or should) to come up with the recommendation. The maximum of 80 lbs. has been stamped directly on the tire from the tire manufacturer from all the tires I've had. My ARV Sprinter van dually 3500 has a sticker of 61 lbs. for all tires front and back.
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Old 05-09-2020, 06:25 PM   #5
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Just from your report, roadtrek owners here, and my Chevy Express-based Airstream Avenue, it seems they are all stickered 50psi/80psi max front to rear.

But also from others reporting here and a blog I follow, the Chevy's seem to track and handle a little better at 10-15psi more in front and max in the rear with no detriment to ride quality.

For this reason, I run 60 front/80 rear. I also think a little more load capacity is a good thing in front because I weighed mine and the front is 4000lbs (nearly).
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Old 05-10-2020, 12:26 AM   #6
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The proper pressure is not necessarily the max, but is dictated by the load. Each tire manufacturer has a pressure Vs Load chart on their website and ideally you would weigh the load on the front and rear tires and use the chart to determine the proper pressure. That said, the vehicle manufacturer afixes a sticker to the front door jamb specifying the proper pressure based on the anticipated loading.
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Old 05-10-2020, 03:02 PM   #7
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I consider several factors for tire pressure:

a. the vehicle manufacturer's recommended pressure for a car/truck/trailer, but use the coach builder's recommendation for our RV.

b. tire wear. I rotate tires frequently. I look for uniform tread wear wear, and use a small metal ruler's metric scale for measuring depth of tread at the center and at the 1st groove on the outside and inside of the tire.

c. ride quality to some extent.
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Old 05-14-2020, 04:28 PM   #8
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If you want to avoid rollover issues like the Ford Explorer, you need to inflate the tires to the BUILDER specs, as stated on the door. I have read many forums about tire pressures for Roadtreks and in one the Roadtrek service department rep strongly advised folks to use the recommended pressures.
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Old 05-14-2020, 04:36 PM   #9
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All good information.
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Old 05-14-2020, 06:18 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k1hog View Post
I have a 2004 RT 200P, the door sticker states:

80 PSI Rear

50 PSI Front

Is it best to air the tires to the max air pressure?

Thanks

Johnnie
If you give me tire-specifications( maxload, loadrange or pressure behind AT, and speedcode) and Gross Axle Weigt Ratings and if rear Dual or Single load, I can calculate a pressure for you.

Educated guess AT80 psi = loadrange E , LRE, E- load.
Single load rear axle. Probably the 80 psi is higher then what would be calculated for the GAWR rear, but they prescribe that to cover overloading , forbidden but happens often enaugh on ClasB.

Class B is the smaller motorhome or converted lighttruck? For the second division of weight is more to the front axle, because shorter behind the rear axle.
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Old 05-15-2020, 02:08 AM   #11
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This forum often raises questions...why didn't I think of that? If the pressure was stamped on the door by Chevy, then after Roadtrek altered the load and balance, why do they say, in owners manual, follow the chassis manufacturer?
As an idiot, does anyone have guidance for a "standard" 2012.Popular 190, not towing, with 50/80 on door?
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Old 05-15-2020, 10:12 AM   #12
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This forum often raises questions...why didn't I think of that? If the pressure was stamped on the door by Chevy, then after Roadtrek altered the load and balance, why do they say, in owners manual, follow the chassis manufacturer?
As an idiot, does anyone have guidance for a "standard" 2012.Popular 190, not towing, with 50/80 on door?

The most popular pressure choice to get the best handling/ride balance seems to be 80psi rear and 65psi front, with some preferring a bit lower front down to as low as 60psi.
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Old 05-15-2020, 12:30 PM   #13
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Always check the tire pressure when they are stone cold and haven't been drove on yet. Do not adjust after being driven unless you're really changing altitude.
Start with the door pressure and adjust from there as you see fit.
Our Sprinter 2500 really needs the 80 psi in the back or it wallows like a hog.
I like 60 in the front. Higher pressure in the front makes it twitchy at speed.
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Old 05-15-2020, 12:44 PM   #14
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Always check the tire pressure when they are stone cold and haven't been drove on yet. Do not adjust after being driven unless you're really changing altitude.
Start with the door pressure and adjust from there as you see fit.
Our Sprinter 2500 really needs the 80 psi in the back or it wallows like a hog.
I like 60 in the front. Higher pressure in the front makes it twitchy at speed.

I think it would be of interest to take a look at this thread about tire pressures that includes a bunch about adjusting pressures at altitude changes (which IMO you shouldn't do).


https://www.classbforum.com/forums/f...pms-10445.html
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Old 05-16-2020, 12:10 PM   #15
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Interesting. I take your point.
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Old 05-17-2020, 03:51 PM   #16
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I have a 2500 sprinter ( 2017 Ascent ) I always Pretrip my van for safety prior to a trip and found that my front and rear tire pressure was set at 70 psi. The door sticker suggests 49psi in the front and 70psi in the rear. So I let air out of the front to match the 49 psi and we started on our trip. 10 miles in the tire sensor went off and after two stops at tire dealerships and a call to the Mercedes Benz dealership that had just completed my airbag recall I found out that my sensors had been changed. The dealer changed the sensors to the 70psi that they felt was safer for the hill driving in my area. To say the least it was a stressful way to start a trip. Just an FYI and hopefully can help someone have a better trip.
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Old 05-20-2020, 12:04 PM   #17
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Our 2007MB/2008RT can reset the pressure sensors by pushing buttons on the instrument display. The procedure is outlined in the owners manual. Set the tires to your preference and reset the TPMs and you're good to go.
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