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Old 03-07-2021, 10:28 PM   #1
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Default Towing behind a class B

Towing behind a class B seems a little strange to me because the B is supposed to be small enough to drive around at your destination, right?
But, once you're hooked up and the canopy is deployed, it sure is a pain to shut down and pack up to drive somewhere.
So at times I would like to tow my Wrangler.
I've been reading a lot about the different packages. It seems that making sure to get a non-binding tow bar is smart, does anyone have a favorite?
But, my main question is about assisted braking. I used to tow a pop-up and I hated the electric brakes. Proportional braking seems the most natural. Systems like the Brake Buddy try to be proportional, but I have my doubts, and they are pretty expensive. The ReadyBrake is a true surge brake, is much more cost effective, and is the one I'm leaning towards. Has anyone used one? Do you like it? It looks like there is no provision for releasing it when you are backing up. If you apply more that 250lbs.(backing uphill, hitting a speed bump,...) it appears the brakes would lock.
I'd love to hear others thoughts,especially if you tow.
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Old 03-08-2021, 03:04 AM   #2
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You canít back up with a toad attached.
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Old 03-08-2021, 12:05 PM   #3
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I tow behind my C, sometimes, but never behind a B. My B camps are not very elaborate and only take minutes to break down. In fact, I leave much of my stuff at the campsite hoping that that will show other folks the site is occupied.

I use a non-binding tow bar from Roadmaster (Falcon) and I have put Roadmaster baseplates on my FIAT 500. I use the Roadmaster EvenBrake proportional braking system.

Why Roadmaster? No particular reason except that's what I started with many years ago as they had the baseplates for the car I was intending to tow at the time and Blue Ox didn't. They make a good product but I will say that attaching the plates to my FIAT was a lot more work than it should have been and that's their fault.

I bought the towbar and brake system used off of the FB marketplace. I paid around $900. The base plates I had to buy new for about $350. The wiring loom with diodes was another $130 and misc. plugs and wires for another $100. I did all the work myself with help of my wife. That's around $1500 in parts, some of them used. I have no idea what installation would cost but I do know that nobody would have done it as well as we did.

The braking system I bought at first because I didn't want to worry about which states required it and which didn't. I ended up with the Roadmaster EvenBrake because I bought it and a towbar for less than the brake system sells new. I am glad I did. I have no experience with other makes and models so I can't compare for you but I will say that the system, once you do the required wiring work, is very slick. It is proportional and adjustable. I too used to tow a popup with electric brakes and this is nothing like that. The brakes are applied gently and you never have that bucking going on behind you or skidding tires. There is a wireless monitor in the coach telling you when the brakes are being applied and if not for that, you would not know. I disconnected the brakes for a test once and the difference stopping power is night and day so I know it's working. I can install or remove it in 1-2 minutes. I'm very happy with the way it works.

The downside is I'm quite a bit longer and I need to be a lot more careful about getting in and out of places along the way. I can't back up and my turning radius is larger. It can be a pain in the ass which is why I said I tow "sometimes". I have 3 trips planned this year in the C and will only bring my car along on 1 of them.
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Old 03-08-2021, 02:53 PM   #4
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Thanks, Eric. That's really helpful hearing your experience. I'm glad to hear the EvenBrake preforms well. Your experience with the pop-up electric brakes is exactly the same as mine and was what I wanted to avoid!
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Old 03-09-2021, 12:44 PM   #5
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We have towed our 1965 VW Beetle behind our B. Could not tell it was there behind our LTV Freedom widebody. A Beetle only weighs less than 1800lbs. No extra braking required anyplace we go.
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Old 03-09-2021, 06:08 PM   #6
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A Beetle only weighs less than 1800lbs. No extra braking required anyplace we go.
Check the vehicle codes for your state. Some (IIRC) require braking systems over 1500 lbs. Maybe it's 2000 or 3000, so you might be okay. But if you start using the Beetle for extra gear, you can easily exceed 2000 lbs.

Here's a few comments about state's rules pulled off the internet:

In California, brakes are required on any trailer coach or camp trailer having a gross weight of 1500 lbs. or more.

In the US, states often require brakes on trailers with a 3000 lbs GVWR so manufacturers often derate 3500 lb axles to 2990 so there is no brake requirement.

Oregon law does not require trailer brakes, but their use is strongly encouraged as an additional safety measure.

The Washington State Patrol's Trailer Requirement states that "every trailer having a gross weight exceeding 3,000 pounds must be equipped with brakes on all wheels".

New trailers sold in Arizona -- Less than 3,000 lbs – no brakes required. More than 3,000 lbs –service brakes on all wheels of the vehicle.

And gross vehicle weight ratings and actual weights measured at the scale are different issues.
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Old 03-09-2021, 10:33 PM   #7
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Had my beetle weighed. It is 1650 empty but with full tank of gas.
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Old 03-10-2021, 11:37 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by vwmaniaman View Post
We have towed our 1965 VW Beetle behind our B. Could not tell it was there behind our LTV Freedom widebody. A Beetle only weighs less than 1800lbs. No extra braking required anyplace we go.
Not true. ID weight limit is 1500lbs.

Here's a state by state list.
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Old 03-13-2021, 09:43 PM   #9
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You canít back up with a toad attached.
Sometimes you can, sometimes you can't. Some tow dollies have an additional pivot point built into the cradle between the wheels (i.e. U-Haul rental dollies), so those won't back up far before they get squirrelly. I've done it short distances, but it's tricky.

Four-wheels-down toads will be different, and I don't have experience with that (yet). Soon I will be towing something with my Roadtrek, or tow my Roadtrek behind something (it has a Spicer driveshaft disconnect).

Anytime you have more than one pivot point, there's too much uncertainty to backing up. A single pivot point is controllable (like a trailer ball) but needs some skill on part of the driver.

Best advice I heard was to back up with your hands at the bottom of your steering wheel, so you don't have to think backwards.
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Old 03-14-2021, 04:13 PM   #10
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Just be sure your vehicle can be towed with drive wheels down. Some transmissions are splash oiled from the input shaft. I am not sure where you can find it for your's but the t5 trans in the old mustang can cook bearings if towed long distance rear wheels down.
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Old 03-14-2021, 04:39 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkS View Post
Towing behind a class B seems a little strange to me because the B is supposed to be small enough to drive around at your destination, right?
But, once you're hooked up and the canopy is deployed, it sure is a pain to shut down and pack up to drive somewhere.
So at times I would like to tow my Wrangler.
I've been reading a lot about the different packages. It seems that making sure to get a non-binding tow bar is smart, does anyone have a favorite?
But, my main question is about assisted braking. I used to tow a pop-up and I hated the electric brakes. Proportional braking seems the most natural. Systems like the Brake Buddy try to be proportional, but I have my doubts, and they are pretty expensive. The ReadyBrake is a true surge brake, is much more cost effective, and is the one I'm leaning towards. Has anyone used one? Do you like it? It looks like there is no provision for releasing it when you are backing up. If you apply more that 250lbs.(backing uphill, hitting a speed bump,...) it appears the brakes would lock.
I'd love to hear others thoughts,especially if you tow.
I moved from wershington state to Alabama in a 2001 great west class b. We had a dolly and pulled a pt cruiser convertible. Had no problem backing up as I used to drive semi. The only problem I had was in Nebraska when a yuppie cut me off in her daddy's BMW laughing her guts out as I had to slam on my brakes or turn her into a pile. Fortunately have been a professional driver I was able to miss her by using the safety lane on the right. It was bumper to bumper traffic. MyToad fishtailed I came out of it without hitting anyone. The traffic behind saw what was happening and backed off enough she got back into the fast lane laughing her smart but off the whole time. The only damage was I put flat spots on my new tires I put on before the trip. I do drive with a camera always. So if you can pull a trailer with motorcycles and other toys in a 1 room class b. You shouldn't have any problems pulling a toad . Be careful and buy a camera they're under $100.if you have a witness like that stupid drivers will have to pay for being stupid.
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Old 03-14-2021, 04:44 PM   #12
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We tow our 2010 2-door Wrangler behind our 2014 Roadtrek CS Adventurous. We don't use any assisted braking, although your state laws may require one. When towing, we don't even know it's back there.
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Old 03-14-2021, 05:03 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by MarCorpsMustang View Post
We tow our 2010 2-door Wrangler behind our 2014 Roadtrek CS Adventurous. We don't use any assisted braking, although your state laws may require one. When towing, we don't even know it's back there.
Towing a 4000 lb Wrangler with no assisted braking seems pretty risky and is that legal in any state?
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Old 03-14-2021, 07:09 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by gregmchugh View Post
Towing a 4000 lb Wrangler with no assisted braking seems pretty risky and is that legal in any state?
Not likely. There are a couple of states that don't have a weight limit (Oregon for example), but instead have a minimum stopping distance requirement. If you can go from 20 MPH to stopped in 40 ft, you are legal. But that is just 2 or 3 states, and it also is a hard requirement to meet for a loaded down campervan pulling 4000 lbs.
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