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Old 08-06-2020, 06:59 PM   #1
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Default Transportation question

I have just started my search for a Class B RV. It will be my first RV and I will be accompanied by a small dog. How do people get from wherever they have set up camp to local attractions, shopping, hiking trails, etc. etc. I am trying to think through the logistics of travelling on a Class B RV and whether it will work. I envision trips lasting several months each year through the US and Canada. My late husband and I did long distance trips on a trawler so I am comfortable with that lifestyle but there were two of us to share the joy. Any sage advice is welcome.
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Old 08-06-2020, 08:53 PM   #2
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This is my fifth year pulling a trailer with a motorcycle in it for bebopping around. Current bike is a Kawasaki Versys 650.

I generally find a dispersed camping site and stay up to 2 weeks, exploring that area on the motorcycle.

The enclosed trailer can be a load to carry around but is invaluable for storing safety gear, extra tires, and a few replacement parts. I have a 6x10 single axle cargo trailer. Total weight with everything thing in it including a Champion generator is 2500lbs. The mileage penalty is 1.75 MPG. Obviously, adding this much weight does tend to slow one down when negotiating hills and mountains.
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Old 08-06-2020, 09:49 PM   #3
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I drop a collapsible cone to mark the space as occupied and use the van.


I do have a carrier and we have hauled a trail 90 or bicycles, but didnt much use them.


We choose our camping spots based on trails, parks water etc and runs for food/laundry in the van might be once a week


Some find the truck-camper cool in that once parked you can land the camper on legs, and then use the truck to get around


Mike
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Old 08-06-2020, 11:02 PM   #4
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we either drive the van from the campsite or rent a car if we intend to stay awhile
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Old 08-07-2020, 01:14 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Rusbet View Post
I have just started my search for a Class B RV. It will be my first RV and I will be accompanied by a small dog. How do people get from wherever they have set up camp to local attractions, shopping, hiking trails, etc. etc. I am trying to think through the logistics of travelling on a Class B RV and whether it will work. I envision trips lasting several months each year through the US and Canada. My late husband and I did long distance trips on a trawler so I am comfortable with that lifestyle but there were two of us to share the joy. Any sage advice is welcome.
Make RV friends. The first group I encountered at B4 is the B Rally Group at b-rally.org

They are still going strong and up to B17 an annual get together but they don't have anything to do with RVnet where they first organized. You can browse the past rallies to see what friendships have developed over the years. Also, manufacturer's of Class Bs can connect you with groups with similar RVs. My Class B is part of a very small group and the manufacturer has an annual fest and friendships develop. We call the fest returning to the mothership. Then this forum you can develop friendships. Facebook has many groups for your choosing. The advantage, I think, with Facebook is you can put real names, photos, and people's home page to get to know them. We have made true friends all over the country stopping by on our travels at their homes and vice versa. The last one was a couple traveling through to visit the George Floyd site a couple of weeks ago (Minneapolis) and they came by and we went to a vineyard after. From that first B Rally we attended we have had several what we call socials whether impromptu get togethers or more organized get togethers. We probably attend 4-6 per year. We've had many a solo traveler in our groups.
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Old 08-07-2020, 03:30 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusbet View Post
I have just started my search for a Class B RV. It will be my first RV and I will be accompanied by a small dog. How do people get from wherever they have set up camp to local attractions, shopping, hiking trails, etc. etc. I am trying to think through the logistics of travelling on a Class B RV and whether it will work. I envision trips lasting several months each year through the US and Canada. My late husband and I did long distance trips on a trawler so I am comfortable with that lifestyle but there were two of us to share the joy. Any sage advice is welcome.

Welcome to the forum Rusbet!


We drive our "b" to wherever we are visiting just like a car. Then hit our overnight site at the end of the day. And that end of day site is rarely a reserved spot. But if we stayed somewhere for several days (not something we do) then I agree with the advice to leave something in the site. A collapsible cone sounds like a great idea. You could even place a little flag or market indicating you'll be back.
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Old 08-07-2020, 11:45 AM   #7
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Collapsible laundry basket from Walmart with a rock in it.



Then we go wherever in the van, which is shorter and more nimble than our single cab truck.
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Old 08-07-2020, 02:39 PM   #8
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To be honest, a bigger limitation isn't the van, but a dog. You need to check on where dogs are welcome as tourists... or leave it in the van. Then you have to worry about temperatures and/or barking. That takes some planning and organization. I often wished that my late pup was tiny enough to fit in a carry bag because they can go nearly everywhere. LOL

Most women RVing with their dog(s) seem to make two choices. One is a class B; another is buying a smaller van or a pickup and tow a small trailer. The Casita or Scamp style are popular. There are a number of bloggers and/or youtubers who share their lifestyles and you can see what appeals to you.

For fun, you might want to read this woman's past blog on her decisions of full-timing with a little Casita trailer with 2 dogs. What to tow it with... learning to hook up and back-up. This cures the problem of a vehicle for sightseeing. She no longer full times, but this is a link to her first post.
https://rvsueandcrew.com/2011/04/21/...with-two-dogs/

If you go on youtube and search for van life or van dwellers, you can find links to many people living and traveling in Class B's... and many have websites too. Most have dogs and will discuss dealing with them and side-trips.
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Old 08-07-2020, 02:47 PM   #9
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Making camp in a Class B can be as simple as setting the parking brake and setting up a folding chair...maybe plugging in. If need to move, the biggest hassle is clearing the counters and closing cabinets. Because of limited storage and camping style, we don't have a lot of outside equipment to fuss with (no screen house, fire pit, grill, outdoor lighting etc.) If you move frequently a Class B is great. If you see yourself staying in one place for weeks or more at a time, a larger camper with separate vehicle may be a better fit.
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Old 08-08-2020, 02:04 PM   #10
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We carry a pair of E-bikes on the back of the camper and use them to explore the area and for some groceries. Otherwise, we just pack up and drive the RV for the day.

The issue with E-Bikes is their weight. Some can be very heavy if they are Class 2 and above (bigger motors & higher speeds). Ours weigh 35 pounds each without the batteries, which is near the limit for the bike rack.

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Old 08-08-2020, 05:03 PM   #11
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Is it really necessary to leave a marker in your site if you take your rig out for the day? I mean, if you reserved the spot, shouldn’t it remain yours until you checkout?
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Old 08-08-2020, 05:19 PM   #12
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yes...
some people are careless
we've had people "assume" the chairs and etc we left out were "up for grabs"

this also works in other campgrounds/areas which are not attended ( or the leave a slip in the mailslot and see us in the morning)

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Old 08-08-2020, 05:34 PM   #13
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Is it really necessary to leave a marker in your site if you take your rig out for the day? I mean, if you reserved the spot, shouldn’t it remain yours until you checkout?
I was thinking the same thing. We don't leave a "marker", except for the receipt on the pole. In all the years we have been RVing, I have never encountered an issue with somebody trying to steal our reserved site. Maybe an occasional honest mistake, quickly remedied.

If you have the reservation or receipt, it is yours. The management or campground host will back you up. If I ever encountered a situation where this wasn't true (which I doubt I ever will), I would just move on. Life is too short...
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Old 08-08-2020, 10:32 PM   #14
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Is it really necessary to leave a marker in your site if you take your rig out for the day? I mean, if you reserved the spot, shouldn’t it remain yours until you checkout?
It just depends. My experience is if you don't have a paid campground sticker on a post with a date or a campground host you take your chances. Leaving something doesn't guarantee a spot especially on first come first serve campgrounds. Private campgrounds notoriously have permanent residents who scavange for left items. I've lost more in expensive private campground than a public campground. I had a cheap plastic orange cone with my last name permanently engraved on one side and an occupied on the other side stolen. I never leave anything of value. If the campground also has tent campers then I have no compunctions leaving my screen tent as an occupied sign. If there is a downside to Class B camping coming and going and seemingly leaving an unused site is it.
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Old 08-09-2020, 12:52 PM   #15
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We’ve even had a campground host "resell" out site from under us—because we didn’t leave anything when we left for the day, they thought we weren't coming back. When we returned to see a young father with two little kids innocently enjoying our site with tents, etc., there was no way we were going to make them move, but that's when I devised the sign.
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Old 08-13-2020, 04:06 PM   #16
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If you go the bike or ebike route, look into a Buddy Rider for your smallest family member. Www.buddyrider.ca These are fantastic to carry your dog, and he or she gets to enjoy the view and speed facing forward and near to you. People will laugh, smile, point at you, and even stop you to ask about it, so be prepared to shout out “buddy rider dot ca”!

Gary
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Old 08-13-2020, 06:16 PM   #17
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HI
I'm curious ,,,,,who's bikes
thanks
michael
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Old 08-13-2020, 06:42 PM   #18
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OOOppps I thought the above post would go under Howard's post.
Anyway ,,,,Howard what kind of Ebike did you pick,if I my ask?
We also use Ebike's
My wife has a Townie G1
I just switched to a TeriTrike recumbent Trike ..
We use a rocky mount Swingaway rack.... which I modified to take the Trike.
If things are farther than a Ebike ride ,,, we just take the Van
My comment being a X boater both sail and power would be that "other transportation" is not as important as with a boat.
We cruised for years and would not have been without a dingy :^) ....
The van is easier to handle then a bost and there are plenty of parking spot most places.
Your boating experience will come in handy ,,,,,with all the 12V systems , the "head" and water conservation ,...
Have a great time
michael
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Old 08-13-2020, 07:41 PM   #19
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We use folding electric bicycles. We chose the 'Lectric XP' at under $1000.
Good for 25 miles using battery power only. Farther if peddling.
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Old 08-13-2020, 07:59 PM   #20
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There's two of us in our Class B with a cat. For the most part, when we stay at a commercial campground and want to go out and sightsee, we leave the famous red cone with our last name with an "occupied" white sign on top and usually the sewer hose capped off. On occasion we will use Uber or Lyft.

When we are boondocking and leave with the intention of coming back we don't reserve. If someone is there when we get back, so be it. There usually is a ton of other places.

We have a back pack that converts into a covered stroller for our 7lb cat. He goes with us 95% of the time. We only leave him alone in the RV in a campground when it is night and there is no issue with heat.

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