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Old 11-12-2019, 02:49 AM   #1
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Default Wondering who has gone from Class A to Class B?

Just kind of wondering why some have jumped from the Class A to the Class Bs and why?

What Models, Options did you make the leap too?

Don't want to hear the Spouse did not like the Class A
or is was the cost of fuel

What will you now do differently?
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Old 11-12-2019, 09:26 AM   #2
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Our last ride was a 40 ft Monaco Signature diesel pusher.
Excellent coach. Now sold.
Our new ride is a PW Lexor FL. It is basically our 2nd daily driver. The fact that it is equipped with all the features of our 40 ft-er is just a bonus.
Couldn't really motor around town to pick up groceries in our Monaco.
Works for us.
Iver.
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Old 11-12-2019, 09:52 AM   #3
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Had a Country Coach 36’ and went to a 24’ Winnebago Era. Enjoyed every minute of the CC except that it required planning. The Era goes anywhere and parks anywhere without a thought and still gives us the amenities we need. We really like being able to just meet friends for lunch as we travel rather than make a big event finding a park and taking the toad as we used to.
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Old 11-12-2019, 11:26 AM   #4
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My experience so far:

Class B to Small Class C - loved the bigger bathroom & bigger kitchen, really didn't like having to construct a bed every night & reconstruct a living area every morning.

Small Class C to 30' Class C. Loved the queen sized walk around bed, didn't like the MPG for simple trips like visiting relatives. It ended up being not used much.

30' Class C to current van. Back in my element, handy & useful multipurpose vehicle to have.

Travel trailer + current van. That kind of solved some previous issues. I was limited to trailers below a certain weight. The bed in the one we had was in a slide-out. It could get cold during cold snaps and definitely noisy during rain storms in FL. Fueling up with diesel was a bit of a challenge and I often ended up at truck stops. Typically there would be diesel on the ground etc. & big rigs idling so not exactly pleasant.

34' Class A towing car. By far the most comfortable for living. Think house like. Driving the A was obviously doable but could not be described as pleasant in heavy traffic. It required a high level of attention to keep it within the lines. Having the car at destinations was great. IMO it was a good setup for extended trips if that's what you like.

Currently, we're back to having only the Class B van. We haven't camped in it for a while but I do use it for running some errands and day trips.

We don't know what is next. I'm thinking some sort of basic camper van (maybe even DIY) that offers a bit more interior space than the current van. We'll see.
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Old 11-12-2019, 01:07 PM   #5
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According to my wife, we're into our 2nd 5 year plan. After retirement in 2012, we moved up from a 27 foot Class A to a 36 foot. We snowbird from NH to FL up from a couple of months, now for 6 months. We even took a 2 1/2 month, 6,000 mile cross country trip before heading to FL. Although the Class A with 3 slideouts was comfortable, our campground offered summer storage for an extra $1,100 with 30 days use. The extra cost was about the same cost for fuel up and back. Since it's not good to let an engine sit for 6 months, we opted to trade in the motorhome for a quad slide 5th wheel and the Roadtrek Class B. We leave the 5th wheel in FL year round and drive the RT back and forth and also use it for short camping trips (up to 2 weeks). This seems to work well for now and we'll see what happens in the next 4 or 5 years.
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Old 11-12-2019, 01:11 PM   #6
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If you go from a Class A, 340 sf (8.5 x 40) to something that can park in one space a Class B, 140 sf (7 x 20) you give up a lot of space not counting the the fact the cab area seating in a Class B is a greater percentage of the space than a Class A, you don't give up to much internal functionality other than the number of people you can transport comfortably.

You gain a lot with a Class B in what RVs are intended for. That is mobility. So in some way think about it. You own about 1,900 cf of air hindering your getting around.

Class Bs are closer to functioning just as a steel tent especially if you want to transport more than two people. Unless they are designed right for two people Class Bs can wear on one's personal comfort in long trips in days. For long trips in miles they can be a blessing.

I've gone from an Airstream trailer to a Class B that was not too much bigger than my current Class B. Mobility was the key. I've driven over 210,000 miles in my Class Bs. I never got out of the driveway in about four years of ownership of my Airstream trailer, but it was a hell of a man cave, guest room and mouse trap.
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Old 11-12-2019, 01:29 PM   #7
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Davydd said " I never got out of the driveway in about four years of ownership of my Airstream trailer, but it was a hell of a man cave, guest room and mouse trap. "

Well, I must admit that two things sometimes make my life better: Our Roadtrek and the fact that it is setting in the attached third vehicle garage. Quick escapes for the Sound of Silence are wonderful and can be realized without starting the engine!
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Old 11-12-2019, 03:42 PM   #8
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Davydd said " I never got out of the driveway in about four years of ownership of my Airstream trailer, but it was a hell of a man cave, guest room and mouse trap. "

Well, I must admit that two things sometimes make my life better: Our Roadtrek and the fact that it is setting in the attached third vehicle garage. Quick escapes for the Sound of Silence are wonderful and can be realized without starting the engine!
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i know. Since I moved into an HOA where RVs can't be kept, we bought a condo garage to park our Class B. It is 9 easy country miles away and it is now my man cave with a wood shop and the Class B can now function as a kitchen and bathroom.
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Old 11-12-2019, 06:26 PM   #9
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With the exception of a 27' Holiday Rambler I lived in for 4 years (but never towed), my Chevy Roadtrek is the largest RV I have ever owned.

I love small. The first RV I bought for traveling was a Jayco tent trailer with a 5'x7' box (rear entry, front galley, beds folded out to the sides, room for four, clever bit of packaging). We still have and love a Scamp 13 (another clever bit of packaging), and we recently added the Roadtrek as a family hand-me-down. I honestly can't imagine owning anything larger. Storage, maintenance, mobility, cost-of-operation: smaller is better. My living room is the great outdoors.

Funny thought, though... when we hook up the Scamp to the Roadtrek, the combined rig is as long as a Class A!
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Old 11-13-2019, 07:10 PM   #10
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My wife and I left our 40' Bluebird class a on our RV sites we own in Wyoming. We are now full time in our 2007 Roadtrek 190 Popular 4x4. Been living full time in the Bluebird for 15 years and it was wonderful. We towed the Roadtrek behind the Bluebird.

But now we are entering into a new way of living. Really light and airy. Able to go anywhere at anytime and change plans in a split second (and we do). Flying by the seat of our pants, getting way into the back country, experiencing the outdoors like never before, going to places we couldn't go before. Not having to worry about where to park 45,000 lbs of steel. Fitting into a standard parking spot wherever we go, whatever we do. Being able to take some of the sweetest camp spots because we fit.

Best of all, I can't think of much that I am sacrificing from living in the class A. We have everything we need. Our particular setup has massive amounts of storage and we use it. Screen tent? Yes. Microwave? Yes. Insta Pot? Yes. Air conditioning? Yes sir. Wide screen HD TV and DirecTV with surround system? Yes. Reclining chairs? We got em. Bicycles? Yep! Kayaks even? You betcha! Microwave, stove, shower, fridge? Yep, got 2 fridges even. How about a generator? Yeah, I just push that button on the wall. Much more? Oh, yeah.

Bottom line, I have never felt so happy to be out on the road. Our Bluebird will be waiting for us to use when we get back to our RV sites in Wyoming here and there. I'm done driving the big rig, though. Being free and easy with the Class B is where its at. That's happiness.
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Old 11-15-2019, 12:31 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Davydd View Post
i know. Since I moved into an HOA where RVs can't be kept, we bought a condo garage to park our Class B. It is 9 easy country miles away and it is now my man cave with a wood shop and the Class B can now function as a kitchen and bathroom.


Are there any regulations/restrictions regarding sleeping in these condo garages and/or sleeping inside a vehicle or RV parked therein?
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Old 11-15-2019, 04:11 PM   #12
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Are there any regulations/restrictions regarding sleeping in these condo garages and/or sleeping inside a vehicle or RV parked therein?
You can't leave unattended pets and you can't use the garage to live in which I take it to not take up a permanent residence. You also can't store anything, vehicles, cars, boats, RVs, recreational equipment, etc. outside the units unattended. That's in my documents. People have certainly built in living quarters like dens, offices and lounges, rec rooms, especially with mezzanine structures and probably spend all day there. Some have gone to the expense of putting in bathrooms. I know from the open houses conducted. Whether anyone sleeps there overnight is unknown.

On my smallest of the units I don't have a man door so I would not plan to attempt it nor have a reason to do so, but I can use my RV while there and don't have to invest in amenities like bathrooms, kitchens, bars, or furniture to take naps and such.

When I come and go on trips I can park my van in my home driveway overnight to load and unload. That's kind of a signal to our neighbors of our coming and going in our RV.

I just got my tax statement for future taxes in 2020. Since 2017 when we bought it my assessed value has gone up 33% already. Those units have become desirable as I don't think any new units have been built in the western suburbs of the Twin Cities since. As I said before, that's good for my heirs as I don't intend to or have to sell it as long as I am able bodied, RV or not. However, for anyone with a different investment view, keep in mind there are annual taxes, common owner dues and maybe for some monthly principle & interest finance to pay, but all indications are appreciation will recover all expenses and investment whether you are in for the long gain or for a short time. That beats renting in my case.
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Old 11-15-2019, 09:57 PM   #13
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Default The key is using it....

We never owned a Class A....we had a teardrop trailer before the Class B Sprinter.....we did use the little trailer, but, we sold it after 42 months...too much work to set up and breakdown......

The Class B Sprinter just sits right outside on our driveway. We can just take it out anytime.

We looked fondly at some beautiful Class A's years ago... however, after thinking about it very carefully, I concluded that the price of fuel would keep us from traveling far.

Fuel economy was an issue I was concerned about and of course resale... I think it's generally harder to sell a huge fuel guzzling RV... maybe I'm wrong??? Tell me..

So, using the Class B RV for two people and for driving around as your vehicle does "double duty"... you'll rarely find someone driving a large Class A for groceries.... and, you'll rarely find someone with a Class B RV towing an extra car.

The most convenient RV is the one you use..... Why take all of this if you don't have to.... otherwise, stay at home.

Of course some people live year round in a Class A.... wouldn't work for me.
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Old 03-14-2021, 10:45 PM   #14
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34' Class A towing car. By far the most comfortable for living. Think house like. Driving the A was obviously doable but could not be described as pleasant in heavy traffic. It required a high level of attention to keep it within the lines. Having the car at destinations was great. IMO it was a good setup for extended trips if that's what you like.
Yep, we had a 1994 Foretravel U225 diesel pusher towing a car. Loved it! It had features not normally found in run of the mill motorhomes. The counter tops were corian, even in the bathroom. No plastic anywhere. All the wood was real Walnut. Had a built in trash compacter and a built in counter top blender. Construction was super quality. You did not get pushed around when a big truck passed you or when the wind was blowing. She was old, but she was very comfortable and reasonable to maintain and good fuel mileage!!! Great for extented trips. It was very pleasant to drive. I miss her!!! If you want to get into a new entry level Foretravel, you are looking at over $800,000!!! If it were my choice, we would still have her. Her Cummins diesel dropped a valve 1200 miles from home in Texas, and that is a story all its own. Very Expensive cause we had to have Cummins install a re-manned diesel. We sold her when we got her home.
After being RV less for several years my wife finely thought it would be nice to have a small Class B last autumn. Found a used 2008 RT 210. We haven't returned to camping yet, but have a couple trips planned this year. I will miss the comfort of the old Foretravel! But my wife says she can drive the RT! If she can't, we just will not travel as far in one day!! But boy, oh boy, I am going to miss that big bathroom and shower, and the big bedroom!!!
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Old 03-18-2021, 05:54 PM   #15
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Never had a class A, but we've everything from tents up to large 5th wheels, but are now in a Roadtrek on a Sprinter chassis. I know you don't want to hear the fuel cost angle, but travelling at 22 MPG is hard to ignore.

I don't know what you are looking for, but if it's a very home-like setting with all the comforts, a large A or fiver can't be beat. But our priorities are getting there and doing things - mostly outdoors - when we do get there.

Ever notice how much timer folks take to set up? There's backing in, jacking up, hitching and unhitching the trailer or dingy. Most of the time we just pull in. With a B backing in is no problem. We may or may not hook up water, power, and sewer, depending on our needs. Like to boondock? It's a breeze! even staying overnight at Walmart is much easier if you're only taking up 1 parking place.

Ever pull into an RV park and been told they are full? And then the attendant says "wait, is that a class B? We can do that!" It's happened to us more than once.

Our RT is set up and ready to go at all times. We have a full made up bed and of course, galley and bathroom with shower. Grandkids? No problem. Only have two seats, so no worry about where they will sleep. No dingy? who cares - just drive the RT over to the grocery store or whatever.

I don't have to justify why we have what we have. We have it because it perfectly fits our lifestyle, plain and simple.
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Old 03-18-2021, 06:31 PM   #16
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…………………………..
Ever notice how much timer folks take to set up? There's backing in, jacking up, hitching and unhitching the trailer or dingy. Most of the time we just pull in. With a B backing in is no problem. …………………………………...
This was the key part for our decision to go back to a camper van, a combination of hitching, spring bars, towing, levelling was the final straw which broke the camel back, actually it wasn’t a camel, it was me with 2 back surgery under the belt.

Having 1977/1985 Westfalias experiences we decided to go back to the future hence camper van. In 2013 we couldn’t find anything with felt our old Westfalia so we built our own. In one year we had a fully “campable” van with continual improvements still lingering.

Recently we backed into a tent campsite in Beverly Beach State Park, the same time a fifth wheeler pulled in. We parked, went for a walk to the beach to enjoy the sunset. When we return the fifth wheeler owner was still finishing his setup duties.
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Old 03-18-2021, 06:41 PM   #17
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I hear you, Stan, and can totally relate. The class B is the way to go. We traveled through Joshua Tree NP spur of the moment. Of course, all campgrounds full with kids not in school and everyone tired of staying home. So, we cruise through the park and thoroughly enjoy it being able to park anywhere, even though parking areas are packed. After hiking and sightseeing, we hit the BLM area just outside the park entrance for the night. Hot shower in the van, steak with mushroom dinner, amazing sunset and our “site” cost us 0$.

We head over for some desert fun in the now abandoned Quartzsite for some solitude for a few days. Beautiful night skies and absolute quiet. Refreshing. Next we head to a luxury resort in Phoenix where the RT fits right in. 4 days of pool time and meeting new folks.

Next comes Sedona boondocking at secret backcountry locations that are spectacular. Hiking to ancient cliff dwellings and petroglyph sites.

It’s because of class b that we can travel so spur of the moment and randomly. With campgrounds so full now a days, traveling in something small makes it easier to find your way. In 2 weeks we pull into a resort that will let us in only because we are small and fit on a tent site. Everything else is taken. 15 amp plug in with water is just fine with us. Class B is the way to increased happiness on the road.
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Old 03-21-2021, 06:13 AM   #18
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I suppose you can say I 'started' in a class A. Friend had one and I spent a week traveling with them before buying my first class B.

Seeing them staying mostly on the interstates, and watching them having to call ahead, making sure the parks had a big enough space for them plus their toad, it all seemed like it was more like driving a semi-truck than going on vacation. And their tires cost $800 each.

So I went small and was glad I did. The first class B was a Roadtrek 170, and it drove like a car, and could park almost anywhere. I was still living in a house, and my somewhat stealthy Roadtrek didn't have the graphics on it, so it didn't alert the HOA there was a tiny RV in it.

But then I found another B. It was 19' PleasureWay and it had much more ground clearance with some big oversized tires. The one-ton frame and those big tires took me down some pretty marginal forest service roads. Once it almost got me into trouble.
Following directions from Google, I found my recommended route below a dam turned into a narrow foot bridge! But there was room to turn around.

And then I got a letter from the HOA on that one.

So now I'm done with the HOA, and I'm full time in a 24' class C on a Sprinter chassis. I sold the PleasureWay, but still have the Roadtrek for daily use. It's towable (with a driveshaft disconnect), but unfortunately, the GCWR of my Sprinter class C means I can't tow it behind me.

And to keep from overloading the Sprinter, I had to get a small utility trailer. Almost defeats the purpose of going small, but having a trailer does have some advantages. More storage and a little shop space. A place to keep bikes out of the rain and out of thieve's hands. Plus I can add more water storage in it. And now, there's something to hold my campsite when I go to town.

But this might not be the ultimate RV. I'd like more GVWR than the Sprinter. But then again, I don't want to give up the 18 MPG. Might try to upgrade the rear axle.

B or C, it's always a study in making reasonable compromises.
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Old 03-21-2021, 08:47 PM   #19
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Been Rving for 55+ years.
Wife (of 60 years) and I have had Rv lots at 10 Mile Lakes in Oregon, Colo Spgs Co, and Moore Haven Fl.
Have had Class A, B, C. and tents from time to time.
All have Pros and Cons, obviously.
Liked the Diesel Pusher and Toad combo best for traveling vacations involving lengthy stopovers.
Like the Roadtrek now as we don't do long stopovers; just tour mostly.
Used 5th whls at the aforementioned lots; long term.
Currently living stick-built at the Villages, Fl
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