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Old 07-01-2019, 01:18 AM   #11
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I actually plug in to a GFI outlet in my garage so I have that protection and agree it is important.
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Old 07-01-2019, 03:26 AM   #12
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Default 30A GFCI pigtail

Wow, that's nice. thanks for that! At $134, it's not out of line. They even have a 240 volt version for a few dollars more.

It turns out Home Despot does sell a 240 volt GFCI pigtail, but the 240 volt twistlock socket isn't protected, just the two individual 120 volt socket outputs.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/DEK-10-4...8510/204356742
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Old 07-01-2019, 02:22 PM   #13
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What you have is often better than one long cord. With two shorter cords, you can use just one cord when the distance only requires one, and then you only have the voltage drop from one length of wire.

With two cords of the same size in series, you will get twice the voltage drop. That becomes a problem when you are drawing a large current, such as running air conditioning. If you didn't need a longer cord, there's less voltage drop with a shorter cord (if the same gauge wire). The connectors do add a small amount of resistance, but they are designed to minimize their voltage drop so they don't get hot, and as long as they are in good condition they don't have a major influence on the total loss. If they do get hot, it's time to replace them.

There is a situation where two cords in series can have a safety issue. If a person touches the connectors when they are wet, there can be a shock hazard. But this applies to any high voltage electrical connection; you have to be careful if it's been raining.

I recommend any electrical cord used outside to have a GFCI at the source. This will save your life. If your power panel or electrical outlet doesn't have one, you can get a GFCI on a short "pig-tail" cable and add to the front of your shore power cable.
Sorry but a second GFCI will blow the GFCI in the van. You can't have two GFCI on one circuit.
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Old 07-01-2019, 03:02 PM   #14
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Sorry but a second GFCI will blow the GFCI in the van. You can't have two GFCI on one circuit.

Not always true. Our Roadtrek sits plugged into a GFCI in our garage all the time, and for a while it had GFCI breakers in the van and GFCI outlets(since swapped to standard ones). That was 3 GFCIs in a row and never tripped any of them. A lot of Roadtreks with Tripplite inverter/chargers had issues, but it was very likely the Tripplite in most of them. Pre 2007 Tripplites seem to be less prone to tripping GFCI circuits.
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Old 07-01-2019, 05:33 PM   #15
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Not always true. Our Roadtrek sits plugged into a GFCI in our garage all the time, and for a while it had GFCI breakers in the van and GFCI outlets(since swapped to standard ones). That was 3 GFCIs in a row and never tripped any of them. A lot of Roadtreks with Tripplite inverter/chargers had issues, but it was very likely the Tripplite in most of them. Pre 2007 Tripplites seem to be less prone to tripping GFCI circuits.
Well it could very well be my model RT ( 2005/190/Popular ) but it will trip if double GFCI occurs. Maybe it is because of the type of inverter.
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Old 07-02-2019, 07:40 PM   #16
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I plugged into a GFCI protected outlet box on the outside of my garage wall with all three of my Class Bs. Never tripped.
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Old 07-03-2019, 09:04 PM   #17
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Default GFCI tripping

The reasons GFCI trip can sometimes be a little complicated. GFCI devices measure the the current in the hot wire and subtract it from the current in the neutral using with a small toroid tranformer. If these two are not equal, something is drawing current down a different path and that can potentially be a human being touching a live circuit.

And this works very well at 60 cycle AC. The problem is when the devices powered by the AC circuit create higher frequencies. Like an antenna, these high frequencies will travel down whatever path they can find; the hot wire, the neutral wire, or the ground -- or even travel through the air. And that makes GFCIs think there's a fault.

So don't blame the GFCI, it's usually the loads telling them to trip. What equipment manufacturers need to do, is design better high-frequency filtering so this doesn't happen.
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