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Old 03-29-2017, 02:05 PM   #11
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I, too, share you history as a backcountry camper. However, I did not reach the same conclusion about attempting to approximate that experience with a B-van. Instead of trying to recreate a pale approximation of the old days, we have fully embraced the "tour the country in freedom and comfort" gestalt that, honestly, is part and parcel of the B-van lifestyle. Our conclusion is that rather than spending our time poorly recreating what we have already done, it is better to seek completely new experiences that we can still do well.

Just food for thought.
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Old 03-29-2017, 03:36 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InterBlog View Post
...improving it well beyond OEM installation quality
...
This will vary by builder- that is not my experience with my RV, BUT some of the units we looked at were full of "crapsmanship"

Mike
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Old 03-29-2017, 03:48 PM   #13
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Lots of points to ponder in the above posts. As I type this, we are "camping" at Gamble Rogers Recreation area on the Atlantic coast twenty miles north of Daytona Beach. I say "camping" cuz at this moment we are plugged in with the A/C running inside, I'm sitting under the awning with an outdoor misting fan at me and the wife is walking the beach. The niceties are nice. I'm fixin to ride my motorcycle(towed here in a trailer up and down the coast for a bit. Next week, I plan to take the Roadtrek and the bike out to Big Bend country for a week or so, then on to Arkansas then to North Carolina. While in transit will mostly do the stealth/Walmart thing, probably dispersed or primitive camping while at locations. This all is a lot more convenient and efficient than having to deal with stuff just loaded into a van. And a lot more flexibility. Think on board shower.

But that is for us, different strokes and all that.

We bought our 2000 RT Chevy 200 Versatile for $10,500 four years ago. IT had been neglected. I put quite a bit of time into refreshing the tires, all fluids, getting the mud dauber nests out of the furnace and water heater and a good interior clean along with repairing a couple of water leaks. While not cherry, it's quite squared away and we use it extensively. About 25k miles in the last year, the first year of my retirement.

Good, but expensive idea to rent one for a few days to help you think it all through. There is no way I would go the van with stuff in it route. And I still do tent camp for a month or more per year off of the motorcycle including meal preparation and coffee, of course.

HTH.
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Old 03-29-2017, 11:59 PM   #14
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Thanks BBQ. Yes, in the realm of fully equipped Class Bs, the Travato K has probably interested me as much, or more, than anything else, especially for the bed layout. Very appealing to me. If I give up on my simplicity (KISS) ideas, I may pursue that. I've been looking into renting one, something many here have wisely suggested. Thanks!
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Old 03-30-2017, 12:41 AM   #15
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.

Also, the big bath in the K is a big plus.

Once you have tried it,
you will not be able to go back to other models.
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Old 03-30-2017, 06:00 AM   #16
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Default follow up info on my quest

My most sincere appreciation to everyone who has replied to my intro. I'm overwhelmed by the terrific support here. Every single post has contained great thoughtful advice, support and suggestions. Since I can't thank and reply to each of you individually, I'll do my best to elaborate more on my specific circumstances, needs, thoughts and considerations.

First of all, I feared when I first posted that I might be perceived as a heretic by some from the experienced RV community, for my consideration of such a severely low-tech, simplistic version of RV camping/travel. And Iíve noted, and continue to welcome, the cautionary tone from some of the clearly knowledgable RVers who have so kindly replied. I know itís obvious that Iím a total newbie to all of this, and Iím really working at figuring out what will work best for me and my wife. I also recognized, pretty early on in exploring this blog, the way-cool attitude of ďwhatever works best for YOU is the way to goĒ. Thatís a big part of why I joined.

So, here are a few more details that may serve, in part, as replies to some of the thoughts and suggestions Iíve received.

Iíve already worked through the motorhome/towable trailer debate, and I readily see the advantages of each. But for myself and my wife, it was clear that the RV is really the only choice. With her medical issues and disabilities, I canít, and would not, leave her in camp alone, with our dogs (in a trailer). Taking daily excursions from camp in the RV, to indulge my love of fly fishing, sightseeing, or whatever, would keep her with me, and allow me to tend to the needs of both her and our dogs, which she canít do.

My wife has limited mobility with the use of a walker, and occasionally can use a cane, with help. The small size of a Class B RV is really perfect because of the smaller, narrow spaces which she could easily get around in on her own, without her walker. Sheís able to negotiate stairs, so entering and exiting the RV is no problem, and enjoying the comfort of a camp chair just outside the RV door would be a do-able pleasure for her. But the greatest advantage of a Class B would be her ability to move around without help from me or her walker.

Iíve also noted the frequent advice here to newbies like me to consider buying a carefully selected, older than brand new, used rig, along with the suggestions that being a handyman do-it-your-selfer can save a lot of grief and repair or maintenance expense. For obvious reasons, that all strikes me as extremely wise and reasonable advice.

I am a pretty handy and clever guy, with some confidence in my ability to build things, or solve problems, even when theyíre entirely new to me, with the possible exception of electrical issues, which I hate to admit Iím a total dunce at, and have long been intimidated by. Iíve relied on good friends for helping me with such things. But under pressure, Iím sure I could even overcome that weakness if I had to.

But as much as I appreciate and embrace the D-I-Y concept, my biggest challenge and obstacle is probably that of finding the free time to devote to much problem solving and maintenance work. We live in a small town, beautiful rural mountain area of the Sierra Nevada, and we love it here. But every single aspect of maintaining a home and property in wooded mountains, while providing for every single day-to-day need of two people (and 2 great dogs) falls on my shoulders alone. Fortunately, I'm a good cook and I enjoy it. Between insuring my wife is safe and cared for, and preserving a little bit of time for my own critical needs/pleasures/mental health (fly fishing, fly fishing guiding, photography, kayak paddling), Iím afraid I simply wouldnít be able to keep up with much added responsibility for something like complex RV maintenance/repair. And that is really whatís behind my focus on the K.I.S.S approach to RV travels.

Iím really not trying to cling to my old simple tent-camping aesthetic for any reasons of sentimentality or environmental consciousness. Itís far more about my hope to reclaim some of the pleasures my wife and I have shared in our past camping and travel adventures in a way that might minimize the time and effort required of me to keep it all working reasonably well and without too many additional difficulties.

Finally, I apologize for my overly long posts, and I so appreciate those of you whoíve shown the patience to tolerate them and reply. I really hope to someday find ourselves sharing a campground with any of the great, helpful folks who seem to populate this forum. Thank you!!!
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Old 03-30-2017, 12:48 PM   #17
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.

You are a good husband.

I hope you find you RV and start enjoying it soon.
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Old 03-30-2017, 02:59 PM   #18
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A $25K new high roof Promaster, add an electric step, Electric Waterless Toilet, roof vent, insulation, small folding table etc... You can have simplicity for under $30K and all new.
The Promaster is lower to the ground so it is easier to get in and out.
New 2017 Ram ProMaster 1500 For Sale | Huntington Beach CA | 3C6TRVBGXHE528469
Laveo Dry Flush Chemical Free Odorless Portable Lightweight Electric Waterless Toilet-DF1045 - The Home Depot
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Old 03-30-2017, 03:10 PM   #19
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Quote:
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A $25K new high roof Promaster,
::[/url]
The picture is a high roof 2500.
The quote is a low roof 1500.
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Old 03-30-2017, 03:27 PM   #20
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Its a high roof, here's the sticker:
http://www.chrysler.com/hostd/window...TRVBGXHE528469
They had some low roof 2016 1500's starting at $21k a few weeks ago.
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