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Old 03-28-2016, 06:30 PM   #1
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Default Newbie ? On Powering a CPAP

Am a newbie trying to figure out the easiest way to power a CPAP machine while traveling across country VA to CA and back. Sometimes we will have shore power but many other nights we will not. I have a AirCurve 10 and want to know if I can just use a[I] DC Converter 24V90W for AirSense 10 & AirCurve 10 Machines. I understand that I can't use the humidifier. Would the power last the whole night?

Have tried to read previous related responses but am over-whelmed by them and my general ignorance of all power related RV issues. Any help appreciated. Thanks.
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Old 03-28-2016, 07:19 PM   #2
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Here's the converter: http://www.resmed.com/us/dam/documen...de_glo_eng.pdf

Air10 peak power consumption 106 watts
Air10 typical power consumption 51 watts

You need to figure out how many house batteries your Agile came equipped with.

If your Agile came quipped with 200 amp hours of battery capacity then you have 100Ah to use before recommended recharging.

divide watts by volts to get amps

Using power consumption data from manual:

Peak 106W / 12 volts = around 9 amps : 9Ah (amp hours) might make it through the night if batteries are in good condition and minimal other power use.

Typical 51 watts / 12 volts = 4.25 amps : 4.25 Ah should make it through the night if batteries are in good condition and moderate other power use.

Does your RT come equipped with a 12V accessory outlet that is connected to the house batteries? (You can call RT and ask them if you don't know.)

Does the fridge run on propane in your Agile?
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Old 03-28-2016, 07:44 PM   #3
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A lithium battery, small pure sine inverter and charger would be packaged small enough and light enough to store anywhere or take anywhere. I believe you can purchase a unit already set up that way.
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Old 03-28-2016, 08:29 PM   #4
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The 2014 manual shows 200ah of AGM batteries, so Marko's calcs will be good. The question of the 12v converter would be if it is a DC to DC converter, or are they taking 12 and inverting to AC to run the unit. It will depend on what the base unit actually runs on. The hope would be that the unit is native 12v so you could leave your van inverter off and save the 20 watts or so of wasted power.
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Old 03-28-2016, 10:29 PM   #5
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Thank you all for all of your responses! Really looking forward to trying this out. I apologize for being so clueless but they didn't teach electricity to women in the '50s here. I did learn to cook, clean and sew hems and the cooking came in handy later on.

Here are some responses to the questions you asked, Marko. Really appreciate all your help.

Under the hood, I have two batteries that say EVGC 220A AM 6v 220 AH. I guess these are the coach batteries. The engine battery is under the drivers' seat with the inverter, right?

The refrigerator is a Norcold DEO788B. It's label reads:
Rating AC 120 V, 0.8 A, 60Hz
Courant Nominal DC12/24V 3.0/1.5 A
So I guess it is a Dual Voltage Refrigerator but prefers to run on an AC source when available.

My roadtrek also has 750 watt inverter and a 2500 watt propane generator but I have no idea when I should have them on.

There is a 12V outlet in the ceiling above the bed that I thought I would use for my CPAP machine.

Marko, is the converter that you sent the link to the same as this one? CPAP.com - DC Converter 24V 90W For AirSense™ 10 and AirCurve™ 10 Machines

I'm just looking for the simplest resolution and not interested in carrying a battery booster pack if I can help it.
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Old 03-29-2016, 02:55 PM   #6
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Thanks for the replies,
In the olden days they didn't teach women about electricity here, hence I am clueless on these matters and need all the help I can get.

Marko, In response to your questions,
Under the hood I have two batteries that say EVGC 220A AM 6v 220 AH. I guess
these are the coach batteries. The engine battery is under the driver’s seat with the
inverter, right?

The refrigerator is a Norcold DE0788B. It’s label reads:
Rating AC 120 V, 0.8 A, 60Hz
Courant Nominal DC 12/24V 3.0/1.5 A

So I guess it is a Dual Voltage Refrigerator but prefers to run on an AC source when
available.

My roadtrek also has 750 watt inverter and a 2500 watt propane generator but I
have no idea when I should have them on.

There is a 12V outlet in the ceiling above the bed that I thought I would use for
CPAP machine. Would this work?

Many thanks - REALLY appreciate your help.
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Old 03-30-2016, 02:39 AM   #7
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I have the Resmed 12v adapter and a single 12v coach battery. I can get through the night if I don't use the humidifier. You shoud have no problem plugging it in the lighter socket just make sure to unplug when not in use.
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Old 03-30-2016, 12:34 PM   #8
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That's great info Sebtown

My guess is that you have a fridge that can run on propane. Bumblebee should like expect similar performance with her two battery RT with the additional load of the compressor fridge running on the batteries.

Bumblebee should plug in when the opportunity arises. The overnight charging of the batteries when plugged in will be beneficial. The batteries can get to 80% or 90% charged if you drive long enough but it takes a long time to get them 100% charged so that's why plugging in periodically will be helpful to battery life.

Bumblebee - you'll run the generator for off-grid use of high current draw items like the air conditioner or microwave oven. The inverter has dual functions. Use it to power things like a TV. It is also your battery charger when your van is plugged into utility grid power. Use the remote switch for the inverter & turn it off when not needed as it put a constant load on the batteries.
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Old 04-07-2016, 04:32 PM   #9
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I have a Roadtrek RS with similar electrical and I can run my Cpap all night on either 12v or the inverter no problems.

I suggest you try a night in your driveway to prove that it will work for you.
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Old 04-07-2016, 04:57 PM   #10
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Thanks. Will do that. Appreciate your reply.
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