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Old 05-19-2019, 05:53 PM   #41
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Propane fueled Onan Generator and a AGS system (automatic generator start). The generator will run at least 14 hours on 7 gallons of propane. The Lithium Battery systems may be the future but I’ll wait until they get all the kinks out.
Propane for a diesel Class B; gasoline for the gas models. And you really don't even need the automatic start. Just start the genset, start the AC and go do your errands.
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Old 05-19-2019, 06:47 PM   #42
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Do NOT buy an all-electric coach. Buy one with a propane furnace, a generator, and a roof AC unit. I've been traveling for nearly ten years with my Cavalier King Charles spaniels. If it's 60-75, leave the windows open and set the fantastic fan thermostat to move air through the coach and exhaust it at the roof. The coach will never get above ambient.

If it's going to be warmer than that, start the generator and run the roof air unit at the temp you'd like. If it's cooler, set the furnace thermostat.

It's really just that simple... unless you have the latest and greatest all-electric stuff... and I have absolutely NO advice to offer with that stuff. I do all my own RV repairs, and I wouldn't have the faintest idea how to work on that stuff... nor do I consider it reliable enough to trust my dogs to it. The propane furnace/generator/AC/Fantastic Fan solution has been the de rigeur solution now for nearly 30 years. It's tried and true equipment and is about as reliable as anything you can do in a house.
Thanks, hepcat! This is helpful to hear about your experiences traveling with your fur kids. As you mentioned, there are some very straightforward ways to ensure your pets are safe and comfortable on the road.
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Old 05-19-2019, 06:51 PM   #43
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Propane fueled Onan Generator and a AGS system (automatic generator start). The generator will run at least 14 hours on 7 gallons of propane. The Lithium Battery systems may be the future but I’ll wait until they get all the kinks out.
Thanks, kab449. When an under hood generator is advertised, I would assume it is electric vs. the standard generator stored on the side of a motorhome, correct?
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Old 05-19-2019, 06:59 PM   #44
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I'm also a single traveler, but not full time.
Definitely less is better when traveling. More stuff equals lower gas mileage and you can buy most of what you need along the way. Comfort items as someone said. The longer I have my RV the less I take. So many collapsible things you can get to maximize space.



I have a small dog I travel with. I park in the shade and open all the windows I can and turn on the ceiling fan. I've been gone for over an hour with no problems. Having a phone monitor to alert you to the temps is a great idea.
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Old 05-19-2019, 11:17 PM   #45
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My quick thoughts -

1. Don't do it. Have you had experience leaving your dogs in a running car at all to date? It's nerve-wracking. I did it to visit my dying pops but had visual sightlines to the vehicle from the room and checked every 1-2 hours. Also it was a newer vehicle that I had run idling for several hours at a time and trusted. I cannot imagine simply leaving any living being on a regular basis, unattended.

2. Google how many cop K-9 dogs die from heat stroke - even with a full-time cop who is supposed to be watching them, automatic door release systems to let them out, hardened cruiser configurations that should have no trouble idling around the clock - things happen and they get stuck in a death trap.

3. If at all possible, research renting your house out long-term. Does selling really make sense? It might depending on your location and situation. But why not try renting it and keeping the equity building?

4. I would absolutely advise AGAINST a diesel class B for the sole reason that the generator will be propane. This means high usage rate and the loudest a generator can be! Class Bs usually have a 7 gallon effective fill size at maximum, this is probably only good for 7 hours of running. Then where do you fill it? Not all propane fill stations will even fill a motorhome tank, many will only fill hand held BBQ tanks! (which is fine for travel trailers and fifth wheels and truck campers, but not for motorhomes - I still don't get why no motorhomes use those portable tanks, would solve a lot of issues with keeping the furnace running in the winter, etc.) Whereas with a gas coach, every time you fill up, you're filling up your generator tank too, nice and easy, not much to think about... just have to remember that you have to keep the tank full when you want to run the generator a while because it will cut out at 1/4 tank like all motorhomes do, so you don't have that extra reserve you might think you have! Now if you were talking larger motorhomes, then a diesel motorhome with a diesel generator would be the sweet spot, because they are the quietest and most fuel efficient (and built to last). Although diesel vehicles in general always cost more to service.

(I do see the post above mine reporting 0.5 gallons per hour - maybe it's different on the smaller units in class Bs? I've always seen close to a gallon in tests done on larger propane generator motorhomes and in truck campers, which are the same size genset as a class B.)

In summary - my dogs would start to pant if the temperature in my house approached 78 degrees! So I never felt like I had ANY margin. Even an hour at 85 degrees could be stressful. Don't forget they'll be waiting for you to come back (depends on the dog's personality). Why not travel to locations where you never have to worry quite so much about the outdoor temperature?

One other thing to add - if you're in climates where it's not too hot outside and at least the dash air alone can sustain proper temperatures in the front, then you have a bit of a failsafe, although using more gas.

EDIT/ADDITION: As for myself - I've had a large class A. I never left anyone alone unless it was in a park plugged in. I would have trusted it for an hour or two though. But it took a while to heat up even in 110 degree heat. With the class B, I've noticed that it gets uncomfortably warm in the morning (approaching 80 degrees) even in 55 degree temperatures outside! (and this is with ALL windows fully shaded within, and trees above) Small vehicles simply heat up much faster, unfortunately.
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Old 05-19-2019, 11:54 PM   #46
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We have a 6lb killer attack Chihuahua, long hair. This puppy(she's 12 years) likes laying in the full sun in the back yard when it's in the 90's out. So when we park for a bit with her, it's the fantastic fan on 2 and two windows open near where she always lays, in our bed. Running the fan has proven quite adequate. The temps where she lays are really close if not at outdoor ambient. I've checked. If it's over 100 she gets A/C.

But that is our goofy dog. I would assume different breeds have different requirements. If she were an Husky, Malamute or similar it would be a different scenario. Perfect dog for Flowriduh.
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Old 05-20-2019, 02:02 AM   #47
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I just noticed you said you’re avoiding arizona during hot months, upon first glance I thought you were staying in Arizona... so that helps! But always be wary, humidity can climb quickly in other areas within minutes. Also if you’re only going to be out for an hour, then vents or the AC should work. For some reason I was under the impression you’d be working somewhere with the dogs in the van all day.

Keep in mind, volt start will start, but only for 35 minutes. The system assumes it’s recharged. But with ac running of course it won’t be, so then it restarts, up to five times in total. You might just want to use the key fob to remote start from the beginning. Although on mine I only have the AGM/thin plate batteries from Roadtrek, and it will indeed power the AC for a solid hour!

The AC is pretty loud though.

Also not to nitpick, but to the response above mine... when referring to a person or animal reclining, the word is “lie” - such as “why don’t you lie down and take a nap” or “that’s where he lies to sleep”. Lay refers to placing an object, such as “go ahead and lay that bag of groceries on the table”. The reason people get confused is the past tense of lie is lay, as in “he lay down to take a nap.” Whereas for placing something, it would be “he laid the grocery bag on the table.”
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Old 05-20-2019, 02:24 AM   #48
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Thanks for your input! I work remotely so obviously I would spend minimal time away from my dogs. Currently, I spend almost all of my time with them. As far as selling my house, I have waited until the value has doubled so that I can put a big down payment on a Class B and still have enough to buy a condo or townhouse in a couple of years when I’m tired of traveling.

I’ve given a lot of thought and done a ton of research in preparing for this big life decision. We only live once and at the age of 62, I’m ready to make this one last big change. Btw, I used the word “lay” correctly in my sentence. A list is an inanimate object and would lay out what is important for traveling in an RV. I teach graduate students and a big part of that is teaching students how to write professionally. ��
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Old 05-20-2019, 03:04 AM   #49
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Thanks for your input! I work remotely so obviously I would spend minimal time away from my dogs. Currently, I spend almost all of my time with them. As far as selling my house, I have waited until the value has doubled so that I can put a big down payment on a Class B and still have enough to buy a condo or townhouse in a couple of years when I’m tired of traveling.

I’ve given a lot of thought and done a ton of research in preparing for this big life decision. We only live once and at the age of 62, I’m ready to make this one last big change. Btw, I used the word “lay” correctly in my sentence. A list is an inanimate object and would lay out what is important for traveling in an RV. I teach graduate students and a big part of that is teaching students how to write professionally. ��
Sounds like you have a good plan then on the house - seems like there's too many people ditching everything these days, so I just wanted to put up a yellow flag at least.

Also sorry if there was a mix-up, I wasn't referring to your grammar - I should have quoted the appropriate message but I was on my phone and didn't see it handy (it was in response to the one above mine, SteveJ's response, sorry again that wasn't clear).

I work remotely too, but I just assume most people looking to "leave it all behind" are unlike myself and either work at an on-site job, or are retired and want to see the sights while leaving their dogs behind. That said, while I haven't tried doing any work in the van, it would seem a bit cramped perhaps. I lived full-time in a non-slideout truck camper for almost two years, and that seemed a lot roomier than the van! (mostly due to the permanent bed being in the loft, and being close to a full 8 feet wide) I am sure you have considered all the possibilities, such as a B+ or a small C.
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Old 05-20-2019, 12:03 PM   #50
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Thanks for your input! I work remotely so obviously I would spend minimal time away from my dogs. Currently, I spend almost all of my time with them. As far as selling my house, I have waited until the value has doubled so that I can put a big down payment on a Class B and still have enough to buy a condo or townhouse in a couple of years when I’m tired of traveling.

I’ve given a lot of thought and done a ton of research in preparing for this big life decision. We only live once and at the age of 62, I’m ready to make this one last big change. Btw, I used the word “lay” correctly in my sentence. A list is an inanimate object and would lay out what is important for traveling in an RV. I teach graduate students and a big part of that is teaching students how to write professionally. ��
Last big change? Not on your life. since I was 62 I have gone through an Airsteam trailer and three Class B vans and planning a fourth.
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Old 05-21-2019, 01:03 AM   #51
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Last big change? Not on your life. since I was 62 I have gone through an Airsteam trailer and three Class B vans and planning a fourth.
Lol! Thanks for that! It’s hard sometimes to not give in to society’s expectations and do what one wants to do. I’ve always done what I want but with some health issues, I’ve been more cautious. What will your next Class B be?
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Old 05-21-2019, 01:07 AM   #52
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Sounds like you have a good plan then on the house - seems like there's too many people ditching everything these days, so I just wanted to put up a yellow flag at least.

Also sorry if there was a mix-up, I wasn't referring to your grammar - I should have quoted the appropriate message but I was on my phone and didn't see it handy (it was in response to the one above mine, SteveJ's response, sorry again that wasn't clear).

I work remotely too, but I just assume most people looking to "leave it all behind" are unlike myself and either work at an on-site job, or are retired and want to see the sights while leaving their dogs behind. That said, while I haven't tried doing any work in the van, it would seem a bit cramped perhaps. I lived full-time in a non-slideout truck camper for almost two years, and that seemed a lot roomier than the van! (mostly due to the permanent bed being in the loft, and being close to a full 8 feet wide) I am sure you have considered all the possibilities, such as a B+ or a small C.
Yes, I have seriously considered a B+ (i.e., small Class C), but want the maneuverability of a Class B. I’m still looking at RVs and trying to make this decision. I don’t need much space and am looking forward to handing off the upkeep for a 3 bedroom/2 bath home with a yard. As I’ve heard so many people say, my first will likely not be my last RV.
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Old 05-21-2019, 01:11 AM   #53
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We have a 6lb killer attack Chihuahua, long hair. This puppy(she's 12 years) likes laying in the full sun in the back yard when it's in the 90's out. So when we park for a bit with her, it's the fantastic fan on 2 and two windows open near where she always lays, in our bed. Running the fan has proven quite adequate. The temps where she lays are really close if not at outdoor ambient. I've checked. If it's over 100 she gets A/C.

But that is our goofy dog. I would assume different breeds have different requirements. If she were an Husky, Malamute or similar it would be a different scenario. Perfect dog for Flowriduh.
Thanks, Steve! Chihuahuas really do think they are big dogs, don’t they? My Corgis have an undercoat so they might get hot sooner than your killer Chihuahua. They’re pretty easygoing dogs and can be active but also like being couch potatoes.
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Old 05-21-2019, 01:47 AM   #54
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Thanks, Steve! Chihuahuas really do think they are big dogs, don’t they? My Corgis have an undercoat so they might get hot sooner than your killer Chihuahua. They’re pretty easygoing dogs and can be active but also like being couch potatoes.
This chihuahua does not act a normal one. No constant yapping or nipping and none of that nervous crap. only barks or emits a low growl when there is a reason but she has chased some pretty large dogs away from the chain link fence in the back yard.

A very mellow dog.

Have fun.
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Old 05-22-2019, 02:49 PM   #55
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A friend of mine runs her generator when she has to leave her dogs in the RV...that way, she can keep the AC unit going...
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Old 05-22-2019, 03:40 PM   #56
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This female RV'er should have chosen a Supercharged Class B, maybe a 17 foot Transit or Promaster or Express Van.

https://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/...521-story.html
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Old 05-22-2019, 03:55 PM   #57
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Love my Pleasure Way...Great Class B, they are very well made!!
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Old 05-22-2019, 06:48 PM   #58
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Just to clear up any misconceptions. Typically the A/C will not run “off the battery”, an exhaust fan will, but a rooftop A/C unit requires the generator when off-grid. Of course the dash air can run if the engine is running.
The new 12 volt ProAir A/C will definitely run off the battery.
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Old 05-23-2019, 01:10 PM   #59
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Someone asked me several pages back what our rig was - it's a 2007 Airstream Interstate.

Also, one of my off-forum buddies shared this other product, the Owl Cam, with me the day before yesterday. FINALLY we are making some progress in this segment of the consumer market. This device doesn't do everything that I would want a monitoring system to do, but it's clearly moving in the right direction.

It functions much like the intended-for-stick-and-brick-house Canary that my husband and I jury-rigged with an external air card to continually broadcast conditions from the inside of our van. This one apparently has cameras that point both fore and aft, as well as greater recording capacity and ergonomic options. It's an out-of-the-box solution that might work for some owners who wish to leave pets in their vans.

The obvious downside is that its internal air card is tied to the device. I can (and do) use my Netgear card for multiple purposes in multiple locations, thus making the most of my cellular dollars. If someone uses their Class B for only a month or two a year, it might not make sense to pay for 12 months of the cellular connection on an Owl Cam. Of course, the device could always be moved to the daily driver when not in use in the Class B.

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