Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 07-08-2018, 04:00 AM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: TX
Posts: 9
Default Selecting a new Class B

After owning other types of RVs over the years we purchased our 1998 Pleasure-Way as a fairly low-cost experiment 2 1/2 years ago. We love it. Now, we're ready to make a larger investment in a late model class B. Frankly, the options are overwhelming. I started to build a spreadsheet to catalog and compare options and have been awake at night trying to include everything needed. It occurred to me that one or more of you may have done this and may be willing to share your wisdom. If so, thanks in advance!
__________________

__________________
Jeff & Laura
1998 Pleasure-Way
jlenter is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2018, 02:16 AM   #2
Platinum Member
 
Phoebe3's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2017
Location: California
Posts: 674
Default

Are you attempting to catalog all of the configurations/options on all of the currently available Class Bs? It might be easier to first determine what you want to do with your B and then pick a B that will match your requirements.

For example, you might try the following:

1. Decide on your budget range.

2. Pick your platform: Sprinter, Promaster or Transit. (diesel/gas, FWD/RWD/DRW/4WD, vehicle length, wheelbase, towing, etc.)

3. Pick your specific requirements. That is, are any of the following dealmakers/breakers?
a. Number of people you have to transport/number you have to sleep
b. Toilets: Cassette, gravity dump, mascerator
c. Energy needs: Propane, lithium, solar, generator
d. Configuration: bathroom size, bathroom location, separate sleeping/dining, available storage, etc.)

At each step, a choice may cause potential vans to fall off the list and sometimes what you want simply isn't available. The fewer "requirements" you have, the larger the pool of available Bs. Since you have already owned a PW, you might be bale to articulate what you want/don't want in your next fan. If you could do that, it would be easier for members to suggest a shorter list for you to research.
__________________

__________________
2018 Coachmen Crossfit/Beyond
Phoebe3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-10-2018, 03:36 AM   #3
Silver Member
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Arizona
Posts: 70
Default

Ditto what Phoebe3 said. Good advice. Consider how you'll use the rig, and what components/amenities you do or don't want.
__________________
2010 LTV Free Spirit
1989 VW Westfalia
NAZCamperVan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2018, 10:58 AM   #4
New Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 4
Default

I found this video interesting in helping with the decision making process.

http://youtu.be/rltpR-MsmpE

Lots of good info on Class B's on his channel as well.

Good luck!

Mike
myin13 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2018, 04:51 PM   #5
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Texas
Posts: 43
Default

Mike, Excellent suggestion! I came here to post a link to that video myself.
dhuff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-11-2018, 11:32 PM   #6
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Ontario
Posts: 39
Default

When I started looking I was looking at used, but after seeing the price of something 15 years old with lots of miles/Kms on them, I decided to go new. I looked at many different makes and models and decided on a Carado Banff. First reason was the price, at least $20,000 cheaper than anything else. Second, it had all the options I need. I can live completely off grid, it has lithium’s, solar charger and an under hood generator. It’s a wide open layout, not a cramped sitting area in the rear like some models. And it’s build on a Ram Promaster chassis with the, almost, indestructible 3.6 litre engine. To me this won out over the way more expensive models.
Toolman0114 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2018, 12:28 AM   #7
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 25
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman0114 View Post
When I started looking I was looking at used, but after seeing the price of something 15 years old with lots of miles/Kms on them, I decided to go new. I looked at many different makes and models and decided on a Carado Banff. First reason was the price, at least $20,000 cheaper than anything else. Second, it had all the options I need. I can live completely off grid, it has lithiumís, solar charger and an under hood generator. Itís a wide open layout, not a cramped sitting area in the rear like some models. And itís build on a Ram Promaster chassis with the, almost, indestructible 3.6 litre engine. To me this won out over the way more expensive models.
Which 3.6 engine is that? Gas? I just bought a 2019 Travato and hope the engine is dependable. Iím used to Landcruisers and theyíre bulletproof. I know the Sprinter diesels are as well.
Roadie1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2018, 12:39 AM   #8
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Ontario
Posts: 39
Default

The 3.6 is the Dodge V6 gas engine, much better than their small diesel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadie1 View Post
Which 3.6 engine is that? Gas? I just bought a 2019 Travato and hope the engine is dependable. Iím used to Landcruisers and theyíre bulletproof. I know the Sprinter diesels are as well.
Toolman0114 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2018, 12:46 AM   #9
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 25
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Toolman0114 View Post
The 3.6 is the Dodge V6 gas engine, much better than their small diesel.


Is that the same engine as the RAM ProMaster 280-hp 3.6L V6 gas?
Roadie1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-12-2018, 12:47 AM   #10
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Ontario
Posts: 39
Default

That be the one

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadie1 View Post
Is that the same engine as the RAM ProMaster 280-hp 3.6L V6 gas?
Toolman0114 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2018, 05:00 PM   #11
Gold Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 98
Default

Rather than start with options, start with thinking about how you plan to use the van. Will you be boondocking much or usually plugged in? Off in the wilderness or have reasonable access to water/dump stations? Do you have gear intensive hobbies that require extra storage? Do you use the van in cool weather ? Cold weather? Really cold weather? How many travellers/extra passengers? Is stealth a consideration? etc. I think this kind of analysis will lead you to deciding optimal configuration and chassis.
Belzar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2018, 06:28 PM   #12
New Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: MA
Posts: 15
Default

We just bought a 2019 Travato 59G. We traded in a 2016 of the same model. The ProMaster platform has been outstanding. Easy to drive. We put 51k miles on the previous one. We are traveling musicians and fit all our music gear in as well as all of our living and RV stuff. We had a specific use in mind, and so knew we needed a layout that would accommodate our equipment hauling needs. The advice above about figuring out your needs before looking at models is good. That you had a used rig first helps, as you now know some of what you like and don’t like.
ds10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2018, 08:02 PM   #13
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 36
Default

My opinions and experience FWIW: What is your style of camping? If primarily boondocking/dry camping, verify:
1. OCCC: You will need enough OCCC for a full tank of freshwater and sufficient holding tank sizes while camping. We have found that 30 gal fresh, 20 gray, 10 black are practical minimums for 2 people and a 70 lb. German Shepherd for 4 days of boondocking. I would be the first to admit that if you eat cold food, use paper plates, pit toilets and don't shower you can get by with less water.
2. Sufficient battery capacity and the means to charge to batteries: especially if use CPAP or want to use a compressor refrigerator
If mostly or always have hook-ups, the above parameters are much less restrictive.
2. Access to service. The forums are loaded with people who complain about access to service, especially for their chassis.
3. New vs. used. You are likely to take a significant hit for depreciation if you buy new and will likely spend considerable time getting the bugs worked out. Buying a 2 to 3 year old RV, with full maintenance records, the bugs already worked out and some warranty remaining, at least on the chassis, is recommended by many.
AreCF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-15-2018, 08:07 PM   #14
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 36
Default

We have found 1,500 lb. OCCC to be a practical minimum. 425 lb. for DW, dog and me, 200 lb. for fresh water including the water heater, 100 lb. combined for hitch carrier wit integrated bike carrier, cargo bag, hitch extender and locks. We have 1,690 lb. OCCC that leaves 965 lb. for everything else: food, drinking water, clothes, folding chairs, outdoor rug, portable solar, tools, toys, etc. When fully loaded for 4 to 5 day boondocking/dry camping trip, we are typically within 100 lb. of our OCCC.
AreCF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-16-2018, 11:01 PM   #15
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Ontario
Posts: 391
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AreCF View Post
We have found 1,500 lb. OCCC to be a practical minimum. 425 lb. for DW, dog and me, 200 lb. for fresh water including the water heater, 100 lb. combined for hitch carrier wit integrated bike carrier, cargo bag, hitch extender and locks. We have 1,690 lb. OCCC that leaves 965 lb. for everything else: food, drinking water, clothes, folding chairs, outdoor rug, portable solar, tools, toys, etc. When fully loaded for 4 to 5 day boondocking/dry camping trip, we are typically within 100 lb. of our OCCC.
Don't want to get off topic but could you kindly give me a bit more info on your integrated bike / cargo carrier svp.

We are awaiting delivery of our "B" and I would like to add something similar - fo two bikes plus a small rack, (for portable BBQ plus a couple of roll up folding chairs and an out door mat.)

I have ideas to buy a bike rack - likely swagman XC2 (RV approved) and a simple home made cargo rack I will adapt to install, but great to hear what others have done - aways ready to change my plans for something better!

Thx ........ Brian
<<B-Guy>> is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2018, 12:52 PM   #16
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 36
Default Hitch carrier/Bike rack combination

Brian,
I purchased these items a few years ago. I suspect that prices have increased.
Bike rack: (actually on sale today, 7/172018, 16% off any order)
http://www.discountramps.com/hitch-c...ck/p/BCCB-BDX/ (3-position bike rack: $220 less 10% discount + $50 freight = $$230 vs. $270 on Amazon)

cargo bag:
Reese Explore 63604 Rainproof Cargo Tray Bag ($66.66 Amazon)
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

anti-rattle:
Trimax TAR300 Anti-Rattle 5/8" Keyed Receiver Locking Pin System ($21.36 on Amazon):
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

2. The bike carrier does hold the bikes very securely and does not drag on the ground when backing out of my driveway. I may build a plastic frame out of Ĺ inch plastic pipe to keep the bag rectangular, however, the Rubbermaid Roughneck bins that I use inside do a pretty good job of keeping the cargo bag in a rectangular shape. They also make sure that in case there are any leaks, the contents of the cargo bag stay dry. Plans for the rectangular frame for the inside of the cargo bag are included in the reviews section for this cargo bag at Amazon.com. Be sure to pad the cradles for the bike crossbar to protect you head when (not if) you bump your head on them. I used swimming pool noodles.
Rick
AreCF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2018, 01:16 PM   #17
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 36
Default Hitch carrier cargo bag security

I wrap (encircle several times) my cargo bag with vinyl covered aircraft cable and secure with a padlock. I "stitch" the aircraft cable to the cargo carrier frame. I sometimes multiple padlocks to make "stitching" easier. To get break into the cargo carrier cargo bag, you would literally have to destroy it and the Rubbermaid "Roughneck" containers inside. This may sound complicated, however, after doing this several times to become competent at it, installing or removing the aircraft cable and padlock(s) may take a minute or two.
Rick
AreCF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2018, 01:26 PM   #18
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: Ontario
Posts: 391
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AreCF View Post
I wrap (encircle several times) my cargo bag with vinyl covered aircraft cable and secure with a padlock. I "stitch" the aircraft cable to the cargo carrier frame. I sometimes multiple padlocks to make "stitching" easier. To get break into the cargo carrier cargo bag, you would literally have to destroy it and the Rubbermaid "Roughneck" containers inside. This may sound complicated, however, after doing this several times to become competent at it, installing or removing the aircraft cable and padlock(s) may take a minute or two.
Rick
Rick,

Many thanks for posting the bike/cargo rack info - it looks like just the sort of setup that would work for what I want to do! Not sure if available in Canada, but if not it gives me some ideas as to what I might be able to make up.

I presume it is fairly heavy and maybe a two person job to install/take off the van?

It seems to get pretty good reviews with several people using in on RV's I don't quite understand how it can fold up - I see the hinge at the back of the tray, but guess the bike rack either folds down sideways or maybe has to be removed for the tray to fold?

Brian.
<<B-Guy>> is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2018, 01:47 PM   #19
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 36
Default Install/remove combination hitch carrier/bike rack

I am able to install and remove this carrier on my own. Removing the bike carrier attachment (one large bolt) makes removal/installation easier and by reducing the weight. Also note that, with the bike carrier removed, the hitch carrier can be folded up. This is a very sturdy hitch carrier, much more so than the inexpensive "Hitch Haul" type hitch carriers.
AreCF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-17-2018, 01:48 PM   #20
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 36
Default

This combination hitch carrier/bike carrier can also be purchased on Amazon. It is my understanding that Amazon ships into Canada.
__________________

AreCF is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT. The time now is 10:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×