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Old 08-06-2019, 02:36 AM   #1
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Default The gauge

Curious as to whether or not there is away to identify wire gauge based on its diameter. I know most heavier gauge wires have it imprinted on the wire casing but if it doesn't, is there any way to accurately determine wire gauge?

I'm wondering if the existing 12v heating element wire going to my old Dometic is of sufficient gauge to support a compressor fridge.
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Old 08-06-2019, 01:20 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GallenH View Post
Curious as to whether or not there is away to identify wire gauge based on its diameter. I know most heavier gauge wires have it imprinted on the wire casing but if it doesn't, is there any way to accurately determine wire gauge?

I'm wondering if the existing 12v heating element wire going to my old Dometic is of sufficient gauge to support a compressor fridge.
You can search "diameter of conductor" and find tables with diameters of about any conductor"

10 ga 2.59mm; 12ga 2.05mm; 14ga 1.63mm (going to vary minimally depending on stranding)

My dometic RM8805 had a 120W 12V heating element so at nominal 12V approximately 10A, mine had 12ga stranded conductor

My Domectic CRX 110 replacement with a Danfoss DB35 draws less than 4A
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Old 08-06-2019, 02:15 PM   #3
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You can buy an electric wire gauge in almost any hardware store - cheap wire strippers often include one in the handle. Finding one for stranded wire may be more difficult. Try Amazon.
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Old 08-06-2019, 10:02 PM   #4
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My guess is any wire able to power your old heating element is sufficient for a small rv compressor fridge.
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Old 08-09-2019, 12:57 AM   #5
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Use a pair of calipers or a micrometer if your concerned about accuracy.
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Old 08-11-2019, 06:13 PM   #6
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Be sure you are measuring the diameter of the actual wire and not the insulation over it. Insulation thickness can vary over the same wire diameter. There are charts with actual size conductors illustrated so you can compare what you have to the chart to approximate the gauge if you don't have a caliper.
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Old 08-12-2019, 03:17 AM   #7
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I compare the copper wire to the wire stripping tool. Works well for 12 and14. 16 to 22 ga not usually. 12 is good for 20 amps. 14 is good for 15 amps.
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