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Old 11-17-2015, 03:34 PM   #1
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Default Winterizing advice

Sorry to be such a newbie.
Could someone please post a list of tasks to winterize my '95 Pleasureway. This year I think I'll do it myself.
Thanks so much,
Bob W in Pa
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Old 11-18-2015, 06:42 AM   #2
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A Google search will turn this up..

7 Must Do Steps To Winterizing Your Class B Motorhome from experienced RVers | Sunshine State RV's

Every RV is different...
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Old 11-18-2015, 10:08 PM   #3
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I have a 95 PWay. The steps described in the previous response have always worked for me, except that I've never blown out the lines. The plumbing antifreeze (good to -50) has always been sufficient - and my van sits outdoors in temperatures as low as -40. Just make sure you see pink stuff coming from all the faucets (and toilet flush) and don't forget the outdoor shower.
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Old 11-19-2015, 09:39 PM   #4
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Thanks, you folks are the best!
Bob
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Old 11-19-2015, 09:46 PM   #5
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Default blank page

turns out the above link is a blank page.
Can someone just a simple list of steps; I can most likely figure out the details.
Thanks,
Bob
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Old 11-19-2015, 11:33 PM   #6
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The link works for me (I use Safari as my browser). I've copied the full URL below and that might work for you.. Copy and paste into your browser.

7 Must Do Steps To Winterizing Your Class B Motorhome from experienced RVers | Sunshine State RV's
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Old 11-19-2015, 11:34 PM   #7
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So as soon as I posted the message, the full URL dropped our and simply gave the same link as before.
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Old 11-19-2015, 11:36 PM   #8
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Whether you drive a Roadtrek, a Pleasure Way, a BornFree, or a Rialta...It's that time again. The temperature is starting to drop and it's time to prepare your class b motorhome for freezing temperatures. It's no secret...if you live in an area that gets anywhere remotely close to freezing temperatures, you must winterize your class b motorhome to protect your entire water system from freezing and avoid costly damages come spring time.

***Before starting any type of service on your rv, be sure to read your owners manual regarding specific instructions, especially any instruction on winterizing.***
Materials you will need:

RV Antifreeze. DO NOT USE AUTOMOTIVE ANTIFREEZE! ONLY RV Antifreeze which can be found at Walmart, Lowes, and Home Depot.
Water heater bypass kit, if not installed
Water pump hose extention to connect to the inlet side of the water pump.
Basic hand tools to remove and install drain plugs if needed.
Ok...Let’s get to it

1. Drain all of the water tanks
***Check your owners manual first for drain locations and specific instructions first.***

Drain the holding tanks first. Get it all out before winterizing.
Drain the fresh water tanks
2. Drain the water heater
Lift the stem of the pressure relief valve to bleed excess pressure from water system, and remove the plug. Some models have a nylon plug others, like Roadtreks, have an anode rod to protect the tanks from corrosion.
3. Use an air compressor to blow out the water from the lines.
***Be sure to use no more than 30-40 pounds of pressure and use a pressure regulator. This will prevent any damage to the water system.***

Attach the pressure regulator to your hookup and temporarily place air to expel any water in the water heater.
Release air pressure.
Now you want to bypass the water heater. ***Check your owners manual for the correct valves.*** Close the cold inlet and hot inlet. Then open the bypass that will allow the air pressure and water to bypass the tank.
No you can blow the rest of the system out without loosing air through the water heater outlet.
Re-apply air pressure on the regulator to pressurize the water system.
Start blowing in the following order:
Kitchen sink. Cold first then Hot.

Bathroom. Cold first then Hot.

Toilet. You only need a little bit of pressure, just hold down until the air passes

Outside shower: Cold first the Hot.

Also, any other locations in your rv that connect to the water system, blow the water out.

Remove air pressure and regulator.
4. Water Pump.
**Refer to owners manual for the location of your water pump**

Remove the inlet hose from the water pump.
Remove the line and attach your extra hose.
Place the opposite end of the hose into a full container of RV/Antifreeze.
Turn on the water pump switch.
5. Flow Antifreeze through the water system in the following order:
***Remember to do the Cold first until you see a flow of antifreeze then and the Hot second until you see a flow of antifreeze***

Faucet (Cold then Hot)
Vanity sink (Cold then Hot)
Toilet (Cold then Hot)
Outside Shower (Cold then Hot)
**Remember to let it run until you you see enough antifreeze flow through. This helps to protect your system.

6. Reinstall the water plug to the water heater.
***Be sure to use some form of sealant on the threading like teflon tape.***

Install the plug, the key here is to start installing the plug with your hand so that you can get a good feel that the threading has lined up properly. THIS WILL HELP TO AVOID THE POSSIBILITY OF CROSSTHREADING. Then tighten securely.
You class b rv’s water system is now protected.

7. Protect the Traps: One last step for that extra protection.

Pour Antifreeze through all of the drains and toilet. Be sure to leave a little antifreeze in the toilet.
**Tip: Leave the sink faucets open during the winter to prevent freezing**
Dump the holding tanks one more time since you have just blown water in the system along with some antifreeze. First open the black and then open the grey.
Finally, pour antifreeze through the sink.


Now you are all set for the Winter.


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We would love to hear from you. Comment below any of your suggestions on how you winterizie your RV. If we left something out, please share with us below. For best results, use a professional rv service to winterize your class b motorhome and ensure that it is done correctly and throughly.
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Old 11-20-2015, 01:20 AM   #9
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Why on earth would you put that disgusting-tasting antifreeze into your potable water system once you have blown out the water? I understand the concept of belt-and-suspenders, but a properly blown-out system is perfectly safe. Just pour a bit into the traps and pump some into your macerator via the gray tank and you will be fine.
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Old 11-20-2015, 06:31 AM   #10
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So we have some differences in how we protect our water system from the cold. The procedure above uses both the blowing out of all the lines and the pink antifreeze process. Yes.. belts and suspenders.....

Myself I put a little pink stuff in the black and gray holding tanks which also fills the traps, and I leave the water in my fresh water tank, water heater, water pump, and water lines.

My "Active RV Antifreeze System" installed by Sportsmobile, keeps the pipes from freezing. I do have to keep the hot water heater working with engine heat (while on the road) or electric when parked. The system circulates hot water through the lines when they get near freezing.
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Old 11-20-2015, 01:24 PM   #11
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There is another way to winterize water lines but maybe not all Class Bs are set up to do so. I can drain my lines, shut off my fresh water tank from the system and then fill my water lines with the pink anti-freeze. Before filling the freshwater tank I will hook up to city water and run water through the lines to flush out the anti-freeze. At least that is what I've started and plan to finish next spring. We don't use water from our B for drinking, cooking or coffee so are not all that concerned about residue. It took about 1-1/2 gallons of anti-freeze to fill the lines and run some out into the drains to verify.

What I did last winter for over a week since we picked up our new B in January was to leave it heated all the time until we headed south. We had freshwater in the tank and lines. The B is pretty much winter capable but heat must be on either diesel-fired or shore power to heat a glycol heat exchanger. The waste heat from the glycol keeps the freshwater tank and water lines from freezing and heat inside the B keep water lines inside from freezing. Pink anti-freeze in the waste tanks and the bathroom floor drain (the only trap) does the rest.
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Old 11-22-2015, 05:12 PM   #12
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I used to blow the lines out and not use the antifreeze until I had to replace the 12 volt pump. I found out the diaphragm in the pump dries out over time when there is no liquid on it. Mine cracked which made the pump useless and cost me almost $200 to replace. The toilet also started to leak and it was because the o-rings were dried out too. Using antifreeze helps prevent the components from drying out.

I do agree the antifreeze tastes like junk but it helps preserve the water system. If you have older plumbing, the taste seems to stay in the plastic of the pipes and is not easy to get out. My old RV (1977) had lines like that and I needed to use a cleaner to clear the lines in the spring. My newer RV (2012) had better lines and once I rinsed them out with tap water, the taste was gone.

I don't have an RV any more but have a boat with water lines in it. I use the antifreeze in them and have no problems once I flush the system out in the spring. I need to use about 4 gallons of antifreeze on my boat to winterize it. A gallon for the water system and drains and another 3 gallons to flush the engine. It's easier than finding all the engine drain plugs and trying to drain the entire engine block. It's a Chevy 350 hooked up to a water heater so I don't want to take any chance in cracking the block or water heater.
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Old 11-22-2015, 05:21 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by renrut View Post
I used to blow the lines out and not use the antifreeze until I had to replace the 12 volt pump. I found out the diaphragm in the pump dries out over time when there is no liquid on it.
Hmm. That's not good. Do you remember the brand of the pump? In over a decade of blow-out only, I have never had pump issues of any kind. Has anyone else seen this?

Frankly, if I though it was necessary, I would pull the pump before I would use that ... stuff.

I do agree that antifreeze should be kept in the toilet bowl in order to keep the seals from drying. THAT doesn't bother me.
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Old 11-22-2015, 06:30 PM   #14
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Since it only took me 1-1/2 gallons to fill the lines maybe next year I might try some cheap white lightning moonshine. I wouldn't mind the residual taste.
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Old 11-22-2015, 06:31 PM   #15
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It wasn't the seal on the toilet drain, it was the seal for the flushing valve. We pulled into a campground and hooked up the water. Since the toilet was slowly flushing and we didn't know it, the black water tank filled and started coming up into the shower. We were lucky it never went outside the shower. Like I said in my post, the RV was old (1977) and as far as I know, it was all original. This all happened around 2008 so the pump and seals were close to 30 years old or older. When I bought the replacement pump, the people at the RV store told me about the diaphragm drying out and other seals dry out when the system has no liquid in it.

I still prefer to use the antifreeze in my boat. We usually bring bottled water to drink and the water tank is mostly for dishes and cooking. Of course, I usually use lake water for dishes since there is lots of it.
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Old 11-22-2015, 06:37 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avanti View Post
Hmm. That's not good. Do you remember the brand of the pump? In over a decade of blow-out only, I have never had pump issues of any kind. Has anyone else seen this?

Frankly, if I though it was necessary, I would pull the pump before I would use that ... stuff.

I do agree that antifreeze should be kept in the toilet bowl in order to keep the seals from drying. THAT doesn't bother me.
We had our pump fail after two seasons of blowout. Had used antifreeze previously, and since. On one of the occasions, we blew out, put in some antifreeze and blew out again, so it would be protected in low spots but take much less flushing in the spring, which it did. Don't know if the antifreeze in the pump, but not full, made a difference.

I took the pump apart after replacing it, and both the checkvalve and one of chamber valves were distorted and not seating. I have heard from others that the rubber valves can flutter from air going through them instead of liquid, stretching the rubber enough to distort it. Can't say for sure if that happened to us, though.
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Old 11-22-2015, 06:52 PM   #17
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I guess a lot of people don't drink the water from their systems, but we do. That would clearly make a difference on the perceived disadvantages of adding crappy-tasting chemicals. I guess I feel about water the way DavyDD feels about electricity: "no compromises".

The pressure theory is interesting. I always just use a portable tire inflation compressor--very low volume. Wonder if that helps somehow?
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