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RV Name Winnebago
Year 2018
Make Travato
Model 59K
Length 21'
2018 Travato 59K
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Old 05-02-2018, 06:04 PM   #2
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2May18 -
Hey new owner of Travato 59K, congratulations Rajones. I hope your experience is as good as many of others, including myself. My wife and I purchased a new 2018 59K in February. Zero issues except the solar system did not work. A large pair of connectors, hidden behind the upper left closet wall were either never plugged in together or maybe they shook apart during the drive from manufacturing plant to the dealer. That was a puzzler for the dealer service department to locate since this pair of connectors were not shown on any diagrams. We (dealer and myself) just knew that the ZAMP controller on the wall had wires connected. And the 3 port box on the roof had wires connected. But no continuity between the roof cap and the back of the ZAMP controller. Finally after taking down the ceiling in the wardrobe closet, the dealer literally found an unexpected connector pair, not plugged together.

I get why these mating connectors exist. And never likely to be an issue for anyone else. I suspect the pair of connectors were plugged together at the factory and passed whatever test they do there. But if the mating connectors are not fully seated together, they could work until jarred loose. Thats my theory anyway. But unknown and hidden behind a spot that was sealed up took some time to stinker out.

Now the upper left corner "box" in the wardrobe closet (special corner mainly for a vent pipe) has been altered to have a removeable piece for future easy access to this connector set. And the dealer did a nice job of labeling this cover plate so it will be obvious in the future to anyone what is behind this box, besides a vent pipe.

No scratches or flaws anywhere. No real problems with anything at all. Added the WB roof rack myself since the 59K we bought did not have the roof rack on it; that was interesting to get all of the parts; something that WB I think was not prepared for a post-sale customer to do. I do NOT recommend an owner self-install simply because of a single Rivet Nut used on the ladder mounting bracket. Rivet Nuts are very easy to do if you know what you are doing. If not, you can really screw things up, pun not intended. Everything else about putting together the roof rack is easy. Zero instruction document for this process and there is a bit of drilling required on the already installed rail for the canopy on the passenger side. Pay a dealer to do this job so if they mess up, they can take care of at their expense. Getting all of the right hardware and looking at a few drawings is the key. And being very careful how you do it. Being practiced in doing something similar is HIGHLY advised, otherwise leave it to a dealer to do right, or mess up and correct.

Why did I add a roof rack some might ask? I am a ham radio guy. Access to roof antennas needed. Three antennas in place. None of them drill through the body. Two of three are mounted to the roof rack. One is an unusual VHF antenna that sits on the roof up front near the TV antenna but held in place with four very strong magnets. No ground plane required. This home brew antenna based on another guys magnificent design sites only 3 inches high and yet works outstanding. UHF antenna is about 6 inches high and is bracketed onto a roof rack rail. Both of these antennas will not be taken off by low objects. Not unless the Air Conditioner disappears first. At that point I won't care about my antennas with bigger $$ issue to deal with.

Third antenna is an HF antenna. Drilled and bolted the bracket for that antenna into the roof rack ladder bracket. I have no intention of operating HF radio while driving as that is way more dangerous than using a cell phone. VHF/UHF no problem but HF could be a disaster, at least for me unless you already pre-set everything and just PTT the mic button, then ok. Anyway; the 6 foot tall (minimum) HF antenna is quick disconnected into the base of it on the ladder mounting bracket in seconds. Running coax cable from this antenna without drillling a hole was also a requirement. Turned out to be super easy.

If your not a ham radio guy rajone, some of what I said above won't matter to you. The main thing is I hope you are as pleased with your 59K as my wife and I am.

Oh, you might like this tidbit: If the shower control valve is not rotated fully clockwise with the lever straight down, getting hot water out of the kitchen sink won't happen. The shower will be off as long as the switch on the shower head is off (closed) but with the wall "balance" control swung counterclockwise to any position other than straight down, cold water in that line will get suctioned forward to the kitchen sink. At least that was my experience. Besides rotating this balance control full clockwise, I also installed a shut off valve at the base of the gooseneck hose. so that the shower head has no chance to suction water up and drip out of the head. The on/off button on the shower head sort of turns water flow off but not completely. Turns out this is a common issue with almost any water valve used. I ordered the exact one that James/FITRV used on his 59G through Amazon and put it at the base of the goosneck hose. Works perfect. I did not get the other part he used in the wall of his 59G and don't think I need it in the 'K. So far things are working perfectly. See FITRV blog and video on this topic at fitrv.com's web site.

You don't have to add this extra valve if your shower head button stops water completely or at least good enough. A little water escaping out of the head even if the balance control is full clockwise might be acceptable if your head does dribble a little, and your ok with it.

Gene
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Old 05-10-2018, 03:12 AM   #3
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Default Shower switch and HF antenna

Quote:
Originally Posted by Storysrvwego View Post
2May18 -
Hey new owner of Travato 59K, congratulations Rajones. I hope your experience is as good as many of others, including myself. My wife and I purchased a new 2018 59K in February. Zero issues except the solar system did not work. A large pair of connectors, hidden behind the upper left closet wall were either never plugged in together or maybe they shook apart during the drive from manufacturing plant to the dealer. That was a puzzler for the dealer service department to locate since this pair of connectors were not shown on any diagrams. We (dealer and myself) just knew that the ZAMP controller on the wall had wires connected. And the 3 port box on the roof had wires connected. But no continuity between the roof cap and the back of the ZAMP controller. Finally after taking down the ceiling in the wardrobe closet, the dealer literally found an unexpected connector pair, not plugged together.

I get why these mating connectors exist. And never likely to be an issue for anyone else. I suspect the pair of connectors were plugged together at the factory and passed whatever test they do there. But if the mating connectors are not fully seated together, they could work until jarred loose. Thats my theory anyway. But unknown and hidden behind a spot that was sealed up took some time to stinker out.

Now the upper left corner "box" in the wardrobe closet (special corner mainly for a vent pipe) has been altered to have a removeable piece for future easy access to this connector set. And the dealer did a nice job of labeling this cover plate so it will be obvious in the future to anyone what is behind this box, besides a vent pipe.

No scratches or flaws anywhere. No real problems with anything at all. Added the WB roof rack myself since the 59K we bought did not have the roof rack on it; that was interesting to get all of the parts; something that WB I think was not prepared for a post-sale customer to do. I do NOT recommend an owner self-install simply because of a single Rivet Nut used on the ladder mounting bracket. Rivet Nuts are very easy to do if you know what you are doing. If not, you can really screw things up, pun not intended. Everything else about putting together the roof rack is easy. Zero instruction document for this process and there is a bit of drilling required on the already installed rail for the canopy on the passenger side. Pay a dealer to do this job so if they mess up, they can take care of at their expense. Getting all of the right hardware and looking at a few drawings is the key. And being very careful how you do it. Being practiced in doing something similar is HIGHLY advised, otherwise leave it to a dealer to do right, or mess up and correct.

Why did I add a roof rack some might ask? I am a ham radio guy. Access to roof antennas needed. Three antennas in place. None of them drill through the body. Two of three are mounted to the roof rack. One is an unusual VHF antenna that sits on the roof up front near the TV antenna but held in place with four very strong magnets. No ground plane required. This home brew antenna based on another guys magnificent design sites only 3 inches high and yet works outstanding. UHF antenna is about 6 inches high and is bracketed onto a roof rack rail. Both of these antennas will not be taken off by low objects. Not unless the Air Conditioner disappears first. At that point I won't care about my antennas with bigger $$ issue to deal with.

Third antenna is an HF antenna. Drilled and bolted the bracket for that antenna into the roof rack ladder bracket. I have no intention of operating HF radio while driving as that is way more dangerous than using a cell phone. VHF/UHF no problem but HF could be a disaster, at least for me unless you already pre-set everything and just PTT the mic button, then ok. Anyway; the 6 foot tall (minimum) HF antenna is quick disconnected into the base of it on the ladder mounting bracket in seconds. Running coax cable from this antenna without drillling a hole was also a requirement. Turned out to be super easy.

If your not a ham radio guy rajone, some of what I said above won't matter to you. The main thing is I hope you are as pleased with your 59K as my wife and I am.

Oh, you might like this tidbit: If the shower control valve is not rotated fully clockwise with the lever straight down, getting hot water out of the kitchen sink won't happen. The shower will be off as long as the switch on the shower head is off (closed) but with the wall "balance" control swung counterclockwise to any position other than straight down, cold water in that line will get suctioned forward to the kitchen sink. At least that was my experience. Besides rotating this balance control full clockwise, I also installed a shut off valve at the base of the gooseneck hose. so that the shower head has no chance to suction water up and drip out of the head. The on/off button on the shower head sort of turns water flow off but not completely. Turns out this is a common issue with almost any water valve used. I ordered the exact one that James/FITRV used on his 59G through Amazon and put it at the base of the goosneck hose. Works perfect. I did not get the other part he used in the wall of his 59G and don't think I need it in the 'K. So far things are working perfectly. See FITRV blog and video on this topic at fitrv.com's web site.

You don't have to add this extra valve if your shower head button stops water completely or at least good enough. A little water escaping out of the head even if the balance control is full clockwise might be acceptable if your head does dribble a little, and your ok with it.

Gene
Gene,
Nice write-up! It is my understanding that all handheld shower sprayer switches are designed to allow a small trickle of water to drip, even when they are in the "off" position. We have two Oxygenics handheld shower sprayers. Both function in this manner.
I am interested in more details regarding you HF antenna. I assume you are using a vertical. If so, what are you using for the ground half: counterpoise, radials, something else? I am considering dual receiver hitch extender with top hitch used with an "L" mount for a Hustler 5BTV. Bottom receiver for hitch carrier or bike rack. I have not yet researched if a single counterpoise would be functional (and electrically safe) or if I need radials. Your thoughts/experience, please? Thanks, Rick
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Old 05-10-2018, 04:14 AM   #4
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Gene,
Nice write-up! It is my understanding that all handheld shower sprayer switches are designed to allow a small trickle of water to drip, even when they are in the "off" position.
This is correct. It is a safety mechanism, intended to prevent hot water from being forced into the cold line, which could produce a scalding risk.
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Old 05-10-2018, 11:59 AM   #5
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Nice puzzle solving!
Now how did you get the coax without drilling a hole? Thanks...
73
K2DJN
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Old 05-10-2018, 04:20 PM   #6
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10May18
Hi Rick,
Thank you for the comments re shower water valve and ham radio antenna installation. Additional detail you requested is below.

Re the hand sprayer shut off switch -
I don't think the switches in the handhelds are engineered to have water bypass; I think they are just not of enough quality to be true shut off's. Perhaps someone can defend that they are meant to do that but darn it, they just leave a mess. In a house is one thing but in an RV where the water supply is rocking back and forth while driving, the slight pressure is enough to leave more than a trace in the shower tray. Since the shower is part of the bathroom and in the case of the 59K, the closet, having wet feet on that floor means it gets tracked all around.

From what I interpreted from James at FITRV (see link below), he seemed to indicate that he could not find any valve that did not drip. I find that to be true even with the valves we have on the wall to shut off the water to toilet tanks in our homes. Those things often spray a bit of water while you rotate the shaft. And then when you have them closed (always worry if you torque too much, they will break off), most of them seem to still have just a tiny bit of water pushing through. I used the valve that James recommended for his 59G that he sourced from AMAZON with similar drip issue and he is right, it truly shuts off all flow.Not sure how long this valve will properly work but so far my wife and I are enjoying no dripping from the shower head, after whatever water is left in the head itself. Thought about ordering the wood deck-piece that is now included in the 2019 bathrooms of the 59K's. We discussed this and ultimately decided it would invite dampness, soap scum and hair to remain below the deck. That depends a lot on how often one lifts this out to clean underneath. The temptation of leaving it in place because what you can't see... we do not profess to be zealots to have everything perfectly clean but for this multi purpose floor area, we decided to not mask buildup, and keep it within reason, clean and dry as we travel.

James used a KES brand shut-off valve and in his case, added a CAMCO check valve in his 59G. The plumbing is slightly different in the 59K but probably would benefit from both additions. I decided to start off with the KES shut off valve only. It seems to solve the issue for us but I do note that the shower control valve in the 59K needs to be in the fully clockwise position to prevent cold water pull-through which then dilutes the hot water a bit. Perhaps that position would not be necessary if I also added the check valve he describes. But we both are in the habit of rotating the control valve to the Off position after we shower and we have no issue with hot water at the kitchen sink. Burning hot water is available if we ask it to provide that level of hot.

https://www.thefitrv.com/rv-tips/how...our-rv-shower/

Re HF antenna -
I am not an expert in antennas. But I do avoid the temptation of mounting antennas where the bulk of the radiator is aside vertical surfaces. Especially metal but even glass or other materials. In the worst case, a damp or wet glass or fiberglass surface will definitely effect an RF radiator.

It sort of amuses me how JEEP Wrangler folks often chose a bracket that installs on the rear spare tire carrier for CB, VHF and/or UHF, base loaded antennas. Depending on the frequency, these antennas are all (that I have seen) under 4 feet total height. There is a huge advantage for mounting these "shorty" antennas here because of one factor: Less likely for the upper whip to get damaged by low tree limbs or garage door openings, etc. I get that. I actually have one of these brackets on my Jeep with coax wired to it but do not connect my VHF/UHF radios to it. I have used it for "guest" riders with HT's and I have used it with an occasional additional radio but the performance is definitely not optimal. The bulk of the shorty antenna is sandwiched between the heated wire glass rear window (if composite roof in place) and the rear tire aluminum rim right next to the base load. Just not ideal, but super location from a damage control, and somewhat Stealth perspective.

Hitch receiver mounts are another place that I avoid. The good news is these are super convenient, solid location mounts. The bad news is they are like the rear door JEEP shorty antenna mounting bracket location; not ideal for RF radiators. Again the antenna is parallel-near vertical surfaces that like to reflect signals back into the antenna. Is it real bad? Well thousands of ham radio guys that have mounted antennas here have managed to work contacts ok from this mount location. Nonetheless I would rather be as nice to my radios PA finals as I can and put an antenna where it's base is above the vehicle sheet metal. A nice 5 foot piece of a ROHN section, welded to the floor of the vehicle and sticking up through the center of the roof of a sedan will work fine. One or two full sections of tower up will be needed to get up through RV roofs. Obviously that isn't going to happen. If you have a significant other who is not a died in the wool ham operator, they just wont get that.

So what do I do? I use an ALPHA MOTO antenna. From an efficiency standpoint, this is NOT the most efficient radiator, or collector of wee little signals floating through the air. Because on low Hf frequencies, you need more surface area to collect/send with all of the factors of antenna "math" to be in the groove. And I am not talking about just the Standing Wave Ratio (SWR) aspect which is of course a good thing to get in the good to excellent range. We also have a higher chance of common mode RF snaking its way back toward the radio. And we have all kinds of new noises in a moving vehicle to contend with. Surface static on the radiator. Electrical noises from all sorts of sources in your vehicle and the folks driving by you. And power lines we pass by or under.

In most cases I find todays vehicles to actually be rather quiet compared to the point-ignition or point and capacitive discharge ignition based systems of earlier years. No ground straps from the factory. Poor chassis to body grounding versus some improvement of unibody designs. And more. Don't go strapless. Add a lot of ground straps from front to rear. My JEEP needed that. Admittedly I have not added any straps yet to my Travato. Fortunately so far, the attack of the annoying noises has not caused me any stress in the Travato. But then I a am only operating HF stationary when the vehicle is shut off. No testing with the generator running yet.

As for the choice of using the ALPHA MOTO (AM) versus say, your xBTV vertical, the trapped down size but still much larger xBTV will definitely work better on the 4, 5 or 6 bands it covers, depending on which HUSTLER xBTV you pick. Your mounting, like mileage may vary. The AM antenna I use is certainly a compromise in some regards. Except it will match up to every band from 40 up to 10 meters and passable on 6. Matching or as kids today call it, tuning comes with efficiency loss but usually way better than leaving the match at some horrible mix of what the radio itself sees as inductance, capacitance, resistance. For this the AM antenna is very cool to work with.

A common builtin 3:1 matcher in todays radios will get the stars and planets in alignment in seconds on each of the aforementioned bands. And QSO's across the planet are fairly easy. The db level of received signals is NOT as strong as a larger radiator. But the signal to noise level is pretty good and I have indeed found it a fairly capable DX antenna. Also good for making contacts particularly from Colorado to the East Coast, Hawaii, Japan, etc. here from Idaho. I don't know the characteristics of this antenna, as-mounted for sky wave versus ground wave but it is doing the job quite well, even if signals are a bit soft in many cases. I run a TS-480SAT usually set to 85 watts or less by the way. Add an amplified external speaker is a good idea in some QSO cases.

The base of the AM antenna is mounted nearly roof line high at the rear of my Travato. I posted pictures in the Class B Forum photo Gallery. The vertical radiator itself is on a stainless steel quick disconnect (I like brass better), and is all above the roof line. I do not operate while driving; leaving the whip off the antenna base until I am parked/stationary. Even with the shorter 5 foot whip in place, it's still not going to win any tree branch contest if vehicle in motion. I have a taller whip that works a bit better. And I have a long wire that I can attach to this AM base coil that makes a terrific performance, end fed antenna if I feel like stringing that up instead of using the vertical whips.

I do have to climb my ladder to plug in/unplug the whip or attach the long wire. I have the AM base coil mounted with a very sturdy bracket to the side of my Travato's optional roof rack, ladder bracket on the left rear door. I will add a ground strap from the ladder bracket to the van body but right now I am depending on two grounds: (1) a cable strap between the door and the van body, at the lower hinge point of the door and (2) the stainless steel "rivet nut" used to secure the ladder bracket to the left rear door. I sanded (grinded actually) the inside of the door where this rivet goes through so that the stainless rivet's back side and the doors inner side with some paint on its surface, has metal to metal contact here. I was able to do this because I ordered the roof rack and ladder bracket through dealer parts department and installed the rack, ladder bracket and ladder myself. That is NOT a project I recommend anyone take on. There are a couple of things during the install process that if you do them wrong, your not going to be a happy camper that Rivet Nut for example is not something most people are familiar with how to install properly. It's actually super simple but advise one practice first before doing the actual deed on your expensive RV.

Take a look at ALPHA ANTENNAS web site. Check out the ALPHA MOTO. No, I am not related to them in any way. I just like Steves engineering and results on the air. Yes the 4BTV/5BTV/6BTV installed properly will do better. Ground installed with radials or elevated install without. Either way, not practical for an RV that hasn't been parked permanently. Will the xBTV or other tall vertical work on the rear hitch and without ground radials? Yes, is the answer. But before you do that, you might try that AM antenna. Taller whip. Or use a wire instead of the whip as an end fed. That works really good for me although I confess I almost always just use the more convenient whip on top of the AM's base. I can break camp and drive to town or go home faster with a quick ladder climb to quick-disconnect the whip and drive off.

A number of YouTube videos on this antenna. Steve from ALPHA ANTENNA's original video (URL link below) is probably the best re how he installed it. Some other customer videos online re how they installed it and how it worked for them. I use a similar mount because it is SOLID and adjustable angle. Those that use the lip mounts; not totally sold on those mounts - two set screws holding an antenna that rocks back and forth? neeaaah. Tough on the sheet metal. Not a good or stable ground contact. neeeah.

The current AM antenna now has a very nice stainless steel housing for the base coil. Mine is the original like the one in Steve's video which is PVC plastic housing but otherwise electrically identical and same mounting stud.



Good luck in whatever direction you go. many solutions and all have pros and cons.

Re VHF if your interested- I absolutely love the folded dipole, slot antenna in March QST by W6NBC. Works OUTSTANDING on my metal RV roof (no ground required) and at 3 inches tall, very low profile. I set it on top of my JEEP JK Wranglers roof just to prove it worked on top of that composite plastic roof. Worked there too. Worked on my back yard patio table. Simplex range outstanding. Repeater range therefore good too. 0 gain antenna. Very nice SWR and other analyzer characteristics across entire 144 to 148 megacycle range. Nearly perfect omni directional per W6NBC. Real world results for me on the road or stationary with just a 50 millwatt/1 watt/5 watt HT used (TH-D72A); stunning.

Gene
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Old 05-10-2018, 04:21 PM   #7
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Ahh! Excellent point!
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Old 05-10-2018, 04:42 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Storysrvwego View Post
Re the hand sprayer shut off switch -
I don't think the switches in the handhelds are engineered to have water bypass; I think they are just not of enough quality to be true shut off's. Perhaps someone can defend that they are meant to do that but darn it, they just leave a mess.
Yes, they are. The solution is inelegant, but the problem is real (at least in theory). The issue is specific to the case in which the shutoff is at the end of the shower wand hose. When you have both the hot and the cold valves open, but the wand shutoff closed, then the hot and cold feeds of your water system are directly connected to each other. Now, consider the case in which your water heater is actively heating. This causes the water to expand, producing a slightly higher pressure on the "hot" side of the faucet. This will force hot water into the "cold" feed pipe. Now, if you then turn on the shutoff, you will be getting hot water from BOTH sides of the faucet, thus producing a scalding risk, since there is no cold water to temper the (possibly too) hot water.

There are several ways that this could be addressed, but the "leaky valve" approach is by far the cheapest. So, you are correct that it has to do with cheap construction, but you are wrong that it is not intentional. It is far too pervasive a behavior (and easy enough to prevent) for it to be accidental.

Our friends at fitRV actually acknowledge this logic:

https://www.thefitrv.com/rv-tips/how...our-rv-shower/
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Old 05-10-2018, 05:02 PM   #9
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Nice puzzle solving!
Now how did you get the coax without drilling a hole? Thanks...
73
K2DJN
10May18
Corn/K2DJN,
Well the coax routing without drilling holes in the Promaster sheet metal took a lot of thinking. It turned out to be quite easy on the RAM Promaster!

Opening the rear doors, look at the left side of the door frame where the left rear tail light is mounted. You will see a nice hole there on the side of the tail light lens assembly. I simply dropped the RG-8x cable (no radio-end connector yet) I used down through this hole and grabbed the coax under the chassis from there. The coax is simply secured down the frame of the door from the antenna mount, down to this hole with glue from a hot glue gun. I placed the coax against the door frame steel, right alongside the door gasket and glued it in place there. I did about 2 inch glue "spots" about every 12 inches so I could easily remove this later should I want too. I put the glue on the metal frame side, not directly to the rubber gasket if you can visualize that. The point here was to not get glue on the door gasket itself. The door seal is not compromised in any way

Before I hot glued the cable in the door frame here, I continued to run the coax forward under the unibody frame of the Promaster. This was easy to do, avoiding suspension and muffler contact. I was able to route the coax through a number of the under body wiring wire looms that snapped open if I needed to open them. Most of them I was able to simply pass the coax through without opening the snaps. The destination of the coax was to get it up, and through an existing hole in the front floor located chassis-battery box. Thanks for figuring out to use this box as the way to get cables inside the van goes to James/FITRV for some other electrical projects he has done.

Once the coax was brought up through the chassis batter box, I routed this end of the coax over to the radio body. At this point I adjusted the coax under the chassis for best, non sagging fitment and added wire ties where appropriate to secure the cable along this path. Again checking to make sure my coax was no less protected from rubbing moving rear suspension leaf springs or getting toasted by exhaust system, I finished securing the coax underneath. Rear tires of the Promaster by the way were up on wood step-block ramps I made. Just three layers of 2 x 12 wood gets the rear end jacked up enough to make sliding around under the entire Promaster more comfortable. Watch out for the muffler bolts and sharp end of the exhaust pipe. I wrapped an old towel around these and had no bloody scalp or arms from this operation.

Inside the van, err RV, I routed the coax and my power pole equipped wires over to where the radio body. Added a real AMPHENOL PL-259 w/RG-8x reducer to this end and plugged it all in. Punched the programmable button the front panel of the TS-480 control head that I preset to transmit a 5 watt carrier for the first check. Second check was to punch the match (tuner) button on the radio on every Hf band from 40 through 10 meters for this antenna. Bingo: ON THE AIR. Easy as cake, a piece of pie.

DC power for the radio. Since the above was completed, I next routed 10 gauge Red & Black fused pair of wires from the rear AGM pair of coach batteries up to the front of the Promaster in a similar manner to the coax. I had to add a hole in the battery box to bring these wires up into this box. I used a 3/4 inch common wood bit to easily drill the hole in the plastic battery box. Added a grommet, these wires are now power poled in this box. I then unplugged my radio wires from the chassis battery power pole equipped cables and plugged the radio lines into the coach batteries. Now I have no worries about draining the starting battery. Not worried about draining the coach batteries as much. APO set for 120 minutes on the radio in case I forget to turn the radio off. Solar panel on the roof of the Travato should help keep my radio use only, drain to a minimum.

Ran out of wire at this point but the next and final stage of DC wiring will be to add an under dash mounted, heavy duty DPDT switch so I can elect to change which battery(s) are supplying current to the radios. Radios plural because I will be installing either a TM-V71A or a TM-D710GA when the Chief Financial Office (wife) allows me to fund a new or used one of these. The point is I have the power poles setup to let me plug in three devices; these two radios and perhaps a guest radio or something else I need to run with some amperage. Otherwise the Travato is littered with 12 volt outlets and USB powered outlets for low current use. Not only is WINNEBAGO a star for how they do their 12 volt and 120 volt electrical wiring, the number of power outlets from stem to stern and where they are located is pretty cool. A lot of other brands of RV's including some big names have wiring that ranges from ehh to horrendous. Besides that, you can access all of the electrical and plumbing schematics for WB's right on their web site.

StorysRVwego / Gene / K7TXO
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Old 05-10-2018, 06:45 PM   #10
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10may18
Avanti,
Ahh! Now this is excellent research/information. It is very helpful to know as someone once said; "the rest of the story". With limited information, we sometimes draw the wrong or at least not entirely correct conclusion. Your input is very helpful to close the loop.

Gene / StorysRVwego
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