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Old 02-10-2017, 11:17 AM   #1
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Default New Texas Entrant Into Class B Market

Regency One is now selling Sprinter Class B's. Looks interesting.
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Old 02-10-2017, 02:46 PM   #2
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Interesting - thanks for the link.

I think they're making a biiiig design mistake with the swoopy doopy RV-style graphic accents. Class B market leader Airstream wisely abandoned that practice in 2005, I think it was (or if not, then it was 2004). For many people, much of the point of having a Class B is NOT to visually resemble in any way the proverbial ordinary plywood box stapled to an unrelated chassis, which seem to surround us in near-infinite numbers.

Regency's interior aesthetic is what I call "Texana lite". There are Texas-style influences readily apparent to anyone familiar with them, but they are so subtle that others would not register them as such. That specific design style does resonate deeply with a particular market segment that tends to be very rooted to Texas over the long term, pretty danged conservative, and not surprisingly, very well-moneyed. However, that same market segment also tends to be fond of the notion that everything is bigger in Texas - go big, or go home. And a Class B does not qualify as going big. So, it will be interesting to see how these two competing elements will resolve within the context of sales for this producer.

The Houston RV show starts this coming Wednesday. I will def keep my eyes open to see if one of these is among the display offerings.
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Old 02-10-2017, 03:49 PM   #3
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It would be interesting to see the rest of the electrical specs, since it is touted as all electric. The smallish charger would seem to indicate they aren't intending to run off batteries, which would mean lots of generator use. No mention of how much battery capacity.

I also don't see much storage in the floorplan.
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Old 02-10-2017, 05:17 PM   #4
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I think it is all electric because it assumes you are going to plug into shore power. Same with plumbing use in light of the meager 24 gallon fresh water tank. If they had anything better than that you would think they would certainly tout it.

What alarmed me and set off the BS meter was the comment about R-32 insulation. That is equivalent to over 5" of solid spray polyurethane closed cell insulation. That is simply not true.
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Old 02-10-2017, 08:43 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davydd View Post
...BS meter was the comment about R-32 insulation. That is equivalent to over 5" of solid spray polyurethane closed cell insulation...
I just love how Davydd's real world experience and knowledge comes into play- previous post about drive through std heights was awesome.

who else would just "know" this stuff.

a great example of facts vs opinion as experienced on the internets ( and DC )

we all have opinions- not all of us have facts

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Old 02-10-2017, 08:52 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davydd View Post
I think it is all electric because it assumes you are going to plug into shore power. Same with plumbing use in light of the meager 24 gallon fresh water tank. If they had anything better than that you would think they would certainly tout it.

What alarmed me and set off the BS meter was the comment about R-32 insulation. That is equivalent to over 5" of solid spray polyurethane closed cell insulation. That is simply not true.
could solid sheeting be r-32
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Old 02-10-2017, 10:28 PM   #7
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alot of it,

I have some of the homedepot solid sheeting w foil back- it is rated a R6 per 1 inch...highest rating on the chart is R 31 at 4.5 inches if you want to start stacking it

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Old 02-10-2017, 11:26 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gerrym51 View Post
could solid sheeting be r-32
No. Polyurethane or polyurea type closed cell insulation boards or sprayed is about the best you can install. Don't believe any space age stuff people shill. It has, in round numbers, a rating of about R-6 per inch. That would mean you would need walls over 5" thick. That is not the case in those photos. On top of that you have the unibody steel ribs. An overall R rating has to average in those factors. When you do add up R ratings outside air film, inside air film as it is called and air cavities also have minimal R ratings. Still you simply cannot achieve a R-32 rating in any practical manner. Also with insulation there is a point of diminishing returns you can never overcome with the many windows and it would be foolish to try to even reach R-32 in the walls. Conclusion. The company is knowingly BSing you are they are completely incompetent understanding any of this stuff.
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Old 02-11-2017, 12:12 AM   #9
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SPACELOFT an Aerogel product has a R factor of over 10 per inch. Its what I layered in my roof and other areas as it is the best and most efficient insulation on the market. It is pricey but I would expect it to the be the choice of high end builds. I'm surprised ARV doesn't use it. I have double pane windows with the new ceramic film that helps quite a bit.
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Old 02-11-2017, 12:31 AM   #10
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I've been retired 10 years and have pretty much tried to dump my mind of this stuff. I've heard of Aerogel but have never investigated it. I used to get insulation samples tested at independent labs and tested about everything sold for buildings. Most companies published bogus information and only a few types of insulations were reliable. Anything sprayed was suspect and anything that was white foam was generally bogus. It made me a cynic. Hey, but we are still talking about a whopping 3" thick for that R-32. That wasn't happening with that RV.

The last I heard from Advanced RV is they were infilling the cavities and between ribs with 2" Thinsulate insulation over Hushmat. I'll learn more this coming May at Advanced Fest. I know they researched, tested and dropped the idea of spray foam just before I bought my B. I imagine they look at everything.

I have the blue denim instead of Thinsulate. What I know is I can run a 1500w ceramic electric cube heater sitting on the galley counter and push the temperature up to 98F inside when the outside temperature is close to 0F. I was at 72F when it hit -20F back in December. I keep it on this winter because at a moments notice we put our cat in the B when there is a realtor house showing. I run the heater now on half power. You do reach a point of diminishing returns trying to add more insulation.
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Old 02-11-2017, 12:56 AM   #11
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Maybe they are using vacuum insulated panels?
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Old 02-11-2017, 02:26 AM   #12
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Blue denim is good if you are on a budget and don't plan on having any leaks as it is not a closed cell insulating material. You might as well have installed a sponge. All the materials I used were closed cell and included Thinsulate, neoprene, Aerogel, MLV (for sound proofing). Areogel is pretty expensive, Thinsulate seems to be the the best compromise for cost and insulating/sound proofing efficiency as it is used in most high end vehicles.
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Old 02-11-2017, 04:43 PM   #13
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For those who want the the best insulation on the market and can afford it:
BuyAerogel.com | Blankets
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Old 02-11-2017, 06:45 PM   #14
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Well I email them and they replied, using r32 insulation and radiant barrier. I'm guessing they are using a third party supplier and info so they can point the finger at them if it's incorrect.

BTW promaster accessories has an R-38 kit that's only 3/8 inch thick, magic stuff.
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Old 02-11-2017, 08:53 PM   #15
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The folks on the expedition forum have current and honest data about insulating a vehicle although it is geared toward extreme temps, it applies to anyone who wants the maximum performance and efficiency which equates to less operation and power consumption of AC's and heaters. Its pretty much settled science to use non-hygroscopic materials as they will absorb moisture unless you live in a vacuum, have special powers, or were told it was ok by people taking your money.
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Old 02-12-2017, 03:04 AM   #16
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The vans are too blingy for my taste; I prefer a more stealth look. However it does look like a hip hop model or b-ball player might want one so maybe they have a demographic for them.
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Old 02-12-2017, 05:42 AM   #17
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The graphics do look sleek and flowing though. What irks me is the Texas Belt Buckle Style of their Grille Insert. Dammmmm
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Old 02-12-2017, 01:31 PM   #18
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The graphics are a bit outdated, but that can easily be corrected.

Agree with talktodean, the grill is another story...


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Old 02-12-2017, 01:34 PM   #19
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.

The graphics made this thing look soooooo looooooong


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Old 02-12-2017, 01:52 PM   #20
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I noticed that R32 claim as well and I was very skeptical. It's a well-known limitation of Class Bs that they are difficult to use in the deep south in the summer, or even close to the summer, due to their surface area to volume ratio and the implications for heat transfer. Several of the salespeople at our local Holiday World have declared that to be the single biggest deal-breaker with the new Airstream Interstates. They fire up the rig to show it to prospective buyers, and during the demo, the buyers clue into the fact that they are so difficult to cool, because Texans are exquisitely attuned to stuff like that (due to past experience). At that point of realization, many of them simply walk away from the deal.

SO, given that this is such a big issue around here, it's not surprising to me that a Texas market entrant would focus on it. I wondered if this new producer had somehow applied new tech or whatever, as the basis of their insulation claim.

It's perhaps worth noting that a measure of insulation can also reportedly be achieved from the outside in, rather than the inside out, at least where the roof is concerned. I'm in the process of re-doing my roof and a product called Bus Kote has been recommended for its insulation-related properties. This Sprinter Forum post contains a description and links to a couple of photos. I don't know if the substantial heat reduction claims are valid, but I have to wonder why that product is used on so many buses that lack a/c (e.g., school buses), because do I see it in use quite frequently. One would think that the market would shy away from it if it didn't provide any benefit.
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