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Old 09-29-2019, 10:25 PM   #1
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Default RV Pump Converter Winterizing Kit

I am preparing to winterize. I have managed to install a by pass kit for the water heater, a 30 minute job took me about 4 hours, rethreading fittings, getting it backwards first time.
Anyway, on to the next job, installing a RV Pump Converter Winterizing Kit, so that i can pump antifreeze straight from the bottle.
I have a 1999 Roadtrek 190 Versatile. Looking at the pump, under the stove, there does not seem to be much room to install this valve directly onto the pump, or even in the cabinet under the stove.
Has anybody installed one of these kits, if you did where did you put it?
Thanks
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Old 10-02-2019, 09:47 PM   #2
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Maybe my question was buried too far in the story. I can't believe no one has installed one of these Winterizing kits.
If you have installed a winterizing kit, which includes a valve that switches the pump input to a line which is placed in a bottle of antifreeze, that is sucked up and through the pump into the water lines. Where did you install the valve? or did you just pour a few gallons into the fresh water tank and suck it up from there?
I would like to learn from those who have gone before.
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Old 10-02-2019, 11:17 PM   #3
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Just drain the fresh water tank and put it in there. You need that line protected anyhow. Donít forget the P-traps in the sink and shower. Gotta do the hot water heater bypass and drain the water heater. That ought to cover it.

Some like to blow the lines out with low pressure air but that isnít fool proof. Residual water can collect in a low spot and cause trouble.
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Old 10-03-2019, 12:33 AM   #4
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Here is a post https://roadtreking.com/winterizing-rv-easy-way/ on using the kit. He does not show the installation process and he has a newer Roadtrek with the water pump under a seat. I think most people just put the rv antifreeze in the fresh water tank and pump it from there. The only real disadvantage of that is that it takes a while to get the taste out after you dewinterize. That assumes you drink water from your fresh water tank. We tend to fill gallon jugs with fresh water for that purpose.
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Old 10-03-2019, 12:35 AM   #5
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Many, many people (including most professionals) routinely use compressed air. It is perfectly reliable if done properly, and doing it properly is very easy. Save the pink stuff for the traps and the macerator.
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Old 10-03-2019, 01:22 PM   #6
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Yes putting antifreeze in the fresh water tank is the method i would use, however this winter I will be winterizing at home then again in Florida for the trip back. I would like to use the fresh water tank in Florida without having to flush it in some camp ground. and I will be limited in the availability of tools and compressed air.

Please keep the advice coming.
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Old 10-03-2019, 02:20 PM   #7
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Two things:
1) A simple portable tire-fill compressor works fine for blowing out your system. It does take a bit more skill than a fully-pressure regulated setup, but honestly, it isn't rocket science.

2) The only parts of an RV fresh water system that is at all fragile WRT freeze damage are cheap plastic faucet and valve mechanisms such as those kitchen wands with two kinds of spray pattern, and shower wands with shutoff buttons. They tend to have nooks and crannies that can accumulate residual water, and you have to be thorough if you are going to leave them in the vehicle. But, they are usually trivially easy to remove. I take them out and store them indoors every time I winterize. Takes 3 minutes.
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Old 10-03-2019, 03:34 PM   #8
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Wow, I never thought of the tire fill compressor. What a great idea. You say it takes a little more skill, can you elaborate?
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Old 10-03-2019, 04:06 PM   #9
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Quote:
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Wow, I never thought of the tire fill compressor. What a great idea. You say it takes a little more skill, can you elaborate?
Sure:
There are two issues that partially cancel each other out:
1) They generally don't have pressure limiters, so you have to be careful not to over-pressurize the system.
2) Although they can produce plenty of pressure, they have very limited air volume capacities. This means that it takes time to build up a significant pressure.

What this means in practice for blowing out your water system is that before blowing out each fixture, you have to close its valve and let the pressure build up for a few seconds. You then open the valve and use the accumulated volume of water to blow out that part of the system. How long to wait it the "skill" part, since it depends on the capabilities of your particular compressor. I suppose if you waited too long, you might damage the system. But, you have plenty of leeway due to the limited capacity of these compressors. It is not hard--you just have to pay attention.

You should review a few of the many on-line procedures for blowing out the system. In particular, be sure to work your way outward, starting with the fixture closest to the water tank, and ending with the most peripheral one. I usually make two passes just to be sure.

I often do this three or four times a season. Takes 30 minutes max after the first time, including dismounting my Keurig and taking it indoors. Plus, no yucky-tasting pink stuff in the system (although I guess you said you don't drink your water).
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Old 10-03-2019, 05:22 PM   #10
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If your primary interest is the taste of the water, then the conversion kit sounds like the way to go. You can flush the antifreeze out of the pipes with fresh water pretty quick.

I would be very careful with low pressure air to force the water out. Its essentially not much different than relying on gravity to drain the pipes. If you have ever blown water out of a coiled hose you understand the problem. The air forces an open passageway but the remaining water drains down to fill the low points again. Of course, by design, those low points shouldn't be there on an RV. Low pressure air may force the water out of those low points or it may just bubble it a lot.
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Old 10-03-2019, 05:34 PM   #11
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Quote:
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I would be very careful with low pressure air to force the water out. Its essentially not much different than relying on gravity to drain the pipes. If you have ever blown water out of a coiled hose you understand the problem. The air forces an open passageway but the remaining water drains down to fill the low points again. Of course, by design, those low points shouldn't be there on an RV. Low pressure air may force the water out of those low points or it may just bubble it a lot.
Low pressure air indeed is not suitable for this purpose. But, nobody in this thread has advocated the use of low-pressure air. Do not confuse pressure with volume.

As I explained, the pressure of these little compressors is perfectly adequate. But their VOLUME is limited, and so requires the procedure I outlined.
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Old 10-07-2019, 04:15 AM   #12
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I just extended the water line from the fresh water tank to water pump. Take clamp off tank and stick in antifreeze bottle. Turn on pump until bottle empty. I repeat until antifreeze runs out of all fixtures. Done.
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Old 10-07-2019, 04:44 AM   #13
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Quote:
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I just extended the water line from the fresh water tank to water pump. Take clamp off tank and stick in antifreeze bottle. Turn on pump until bottle empty. I repeat until antifreeze runs out of all fixtures. Done.
That is exactly how the "conversion kit" works, its just fancier. It provides a three way valve to switch between the tank and the antifreeze bottle and hose connections to draw antifreeze from the bottle. That way you don't need to remove any connections each time.
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Old 10-07-2019, 05:12 AM   #14
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Quote:
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I just extended the water line from the fresh water tank to water pump. Take clamp off tank and stick in antifreeze bottle. Turn on pump until bottle empty. I repeat until antifreeze runs out of all fixtures. Done.
Well, I guess that is better than putting that stuff in the fresh tank.
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Old 10-09-2019, 04:56 PM   #15
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I use a Ryobi cordless air compressor to blow out the lines using the brass blow out valve connected to the city water hook up. I put a rubber band around the trigger to keep it running while I go inside to open and close the faucets and sprayers. The pressure will not exceed 25-30 psi. It's perfect for the job. Then I use the RV pump converter winterizing kit to pump RV anti freeze into the system. Been doing this for 8 years, never a problem. It does put antifreeze into the fresh water holding tank when you open the city water fill valve, but rinsing it out a couple times in the spring takes care of the smell. I drink water in containers brought from home.
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