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Old 04-07-2018, 11:37 PM   #1
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Default Have the itch again. Seek feedback

Hello, I'm new to the classbforum, but I have a bit of experience with the RV lifestyle, having been a full timer for 14 years (1998 to 2012 with 9 of those years as a couple, 5 solo). My rigs over those years were fifth wheels (a 22' Skyline non slide and 1/2 ton p/u, then an upgrade to a 29' Alpenlite with slide and quad cab dually). I'll be part time solo traveling this go around, and will stay mostly in forest service campgrounds, national and state parks. I'm through with towing and I'd like to be able to park the rig in my driveway when not traveling. I've looked seriously at small non slide Class C's and my #1 pick would be a 24' LazyDaze, but while it enjoys an enviable reputation for quality and is relatively compact, it just won't fit in the driveway. I've also looked hard at non slide truck campers, but the high profile/rock n rolla drive characteristic/dinette only seating is not very appealing (my #1 pick would be an Artic Fox 865 and 1 ton dually). That brings me to where my head is at today, which is, I think, probably my best all around option, the Class B. And that I've ratcheted down to what may just be absolutely ideal for me as a solo traveler: a Roadtrek 170 Versatile, optioned with drivers side permanent cabinet, passenger side interchangeable armoire, portable solar cell, screen package, tv, continental kit. Did lots of camping w/o hookups previously and never needed a generator, so don't think I'll need one now either. My experience has been that the holding tanks will be full before the batteries run low, so I'll be on the move charging anyway. If I find the need for a generator, then I'll pick up a small inverter gen, such as a Sportsman. I like the adjustable sofa for relaxing, the separate dinette up front, the ingenious aisle shower, the generous storage space, and I think my folding bicycle will fit under the sofa or in the cabover storage bin. It will easily fit in the driveway, the macerator pump will make for easy dumping in the sewer line cleanout at home, and the small V8 should give decent mpg, certainly better than the V10 in the LazyDaze, or a big V8 in a dually. All in all, it may be just the ticket. Wish there was one on a dealers lot nearby that I could look at. There is a 2013 190 Popular sitting on a consignment lot nearby and I took a look at it. Has an Onan with 22 hrs on it, I think 270 watts of solar on the roof, 35,000 miles on the chassis. Firm asking of 69 and change. Needs a serious cleaning top to bottom, inside and out. This look gave me an idea at least of build quality and livability, but my inclination is to purchase new as I prefer to break in an engine myself along with all the other goodies, and I keep my vehicles for a long time.
I'd appreciate any feedback, especially if you are a current or previous owner of an RT170 or an RT190. Some questions that come to mind, answers to which I haven't found yet: If I don't order the continental kit, does the spare go under the vehicle, inside under the sofa, or do I get an inflator kit? How well is a Roadtrek insulated, if at all?
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Old 04-07-2018, 11:51 PM   #2
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Hello, I'm new to the classbforum, but I have a bit of experience with the RV lifestyle, having been a full timer for 14 years (1998 to 2012 with 9 of those years as a couple, 5 solo). My rigs over those years were fifth wheels (a 22' Skyline non slide and 1/2 ton p/u, then an upgrade to a 29' Alpenlite with slide and quad cab dually). I'll be part time solo traveling this go around, and will stay mostly in forest service campgrounds, national and state parks. I'm through with towing and I'd like to be able to park the rig in my driveway when not traveling. I've looked seriously at small non slide Class C's and my #1 pick would be a 24' LazyDaze, but while it enjoys an enviable reputation for quality and is relatively compact, it just won't fit in the driveway. I've also looked hard at non slide truck campers, but the high profile/rock n rolla drive characteristic/dinette only seating is not very appealing (my #1 pick would be an Artic Fox 865 and 1 ton dually). That brings me to where my head is at today, which is, I think, probably my best all around option, the Class B. And that I've ratcheted down to what may just be absolutely ideal for me as a solo traveler: a Roadtrek 170 Versatile, optioned with drivers side permanent cabinet, passenger side interchangeable armoire, portable solar cell, screen package, tv, continental kit. Did lots of camping w/o hookups previously and never needed a generator, so don't think I'll need one now either. My experience has been that the holding tanks will be full before the batteries run low, so I'll be on the move charging anyway. If I find the need for a generator, then I'll pick up a small inverter gen, such as a Sportsman. I like the adjustable sofa for relaxing, the separate dinette up front, the ingenious aisle shower, the generous storage space, and I think my folding bicycle will fit under the sofa or in the cabover storage bin. It will easily fit in the driveway, the macerator pump will make for easy dumping in the sewer line cleanout at home, and the small V8 should give decent mpg, certainly better than the V10 in the LazyDaze, or a big V8 in a dually. All in all, it may be just the ticket. Wish there was one on a dealers lot nearby that I could look at. There is a 2013 190 Popular sitting on a consignment lot nearby and I took a look at it. Has an Onan with 22 hrs on it, I think 270 watts of solar on the roof, 35,000 miles on the chassis. Firm asking of 69 and change. Needs a serious cleaning top to bottom, inside and out. This look gave me an idea at least of build quality and livability, but my inclination is to purchase new as I prefer to break in an engine myself along with all the other goodies, and I keep my vehicles for a long time.
I'd appreciate any feedback, especially if you are a current or previous owner of an RT170 or an RT190. Some questions that come to mind, answers to which I haven't found yet: If I don't order the continental kit, does the spare go under the vehicle, inside under the sofa, or do I get an inflator kit? How well is a Roadtrek insulated, if at all?

I'd look at a Travato in the new L series .lithium and big inverter
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Old 04-08-2018, 05:07 AM   #3
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I have a 2012 Pleasureway Lexor that I purchased new. When shopping for my van, I do recall being told by a salesperson, if you buy an RT do not buy the 170. I recall he said something about the 6.0L engine in the 190 was much better than the 4.8L engine. Ultimately, I didn't buy the RT 190 with the 6.0L but instead the Pleasureway with the 6.0L. Now that I have the 6.0L, I cannot imagine my van with a 4.8L. Sometimes I feel I need even more engine than the 6.0.
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Old 04-08-2018, 05:42 PM   #4
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Hi, welcome to the Group. From a former 190P owner, I think you might be better served by the size of a 190 or equivalent in another model. I had the 6.0 in the 190 and have it in the 210 today....super engine - never needed any service I couldn't perform myself. I like your layout plans inside. You mentioned generators, you could pick up a Honda 2000i or a Clone for when you need it....only problem I see is the storage of the generator and the gas to operate it. Safe travels, Ron
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Old 04-08-2018, 09:28 PM   #5
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Hi, welcome to the Group. From a former 190P owner, I think you might be better served by the size of a 190 or equivalent in another model. I had the 6.0 in the 190 and have it in the 210 today....super engine - never needed any service I couldn't perform myself. I like your layout plans inside. You mentioned generators, you could pick up a Honda 2000i or a Clone for when you need it....only problem I see is the storage of the generator and the gas to operate it. Safe travels, Ron
You could look at a Carado Axion. They are not selling well and some dealers have asked as low as $60k for an optioned up 2017 model with lithium 400, 2000w inverter, TV, solar, underhood generator. Much less claustrophobic than a 170 and still only 17'9" long. On a recent 1000 mile trip I got 17.4mpg on mine with a lot of 70mph cruising. Bed is way more comfy than sleeping on a seating area. Want to relax? Just reverse the passenger seat and turn the drivers seat towards it and use it for a foot rest. You can adjust recline etc. Caveats, the heat/hot water doesn't work above 3300 ft. altitude without mods (I'm researching this right now), combined holding tank, no spare without buying the rear mount kit, fridge a little hard to get to, and its kinda tall, so some drive throughs are off limits. Also, I plan eventually to upgrade the shocks (gas Bilsteins or Monroes) to increase body motion damping over undulations. Ventilation limited and don't know if you can get screens for side and back doors. There is insulation.

I use plug-in electric appliances (hot pot, toaster, skillet) for cooking and have never needed the cooktop. Center aisle is open from the back so you could carry your bike, but then you might the have to go around to the back doors to get to the toilet. At night when you fold the bed out into the aisle, you could probably put the bike in front of the sliding door, but would block the fridge.

I got mine to keep the dog cool when I need to leave the vehicle in hot weather. AC runs about 3 hours on the batteries, and they recharge in about 90 min. once you start driving.

And, don't forget that for convenience, shortness is greatness. Same U-turn as Honda Accord.
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Old 04-08-2018, 11:45 PM   #6
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I'd look at a Travato in the new L series .lithium and big inverter
Thx for the feedback. I've looked at the Travato. Like the chassis, like the bathroom in both models, but that is where my interest ends. I didn't find the seating comfortable, and am still a fan of the versatility of a 3-way fridge over a compressor fridge. A small 3-way will avg less than .25 gal per 24 hrs propane usage, is 100% quiet, and will not put heat into the coach interior. I'm intrigued by lithium batteries, but not by the hefty price tag. Likewise I'm intrigued by the GU, but I've seen youtube videos of the vibration that can occur with a GU, which gives me cause for concern. My rv experience has been with tried and true technology, and while not the latest and greatest, it still gets the job done.
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Old 04-09-2018, 12:13 AM   #7
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I have a 2012 Pleasureway Lexor that I purchased new. When shopping for my van, I do recall being told by a salesperson, if you buy an RT do not buy the 170. I recall he said something about the 6.0L engine in the 190 was much better than the 4.8L engine. Ultimately, I didn't buy the RT 190 with the 6.0L but instead the Pleasureway with the 6.0L. Now that I have the 6.0L, I cannot imagine my van with a 4.8L. Sometimes I feel I need even more engine than the 6.0.
Thx for the feedback. Both the 4.8 and the 6.0 are good engines. The 4.8 has been around a bit longer and there are many of them still on the road with 200,000+ miles on the odometer. Promaster and Transit both have V6 engines with similar HP/torque ratings as the GM 4.8, yet in heavier GVWR application than seen on the RT170, so I'm not worried about being under powered. Portable generator and fuel storage is easily handled with the addition of a receiver mount storage box, if it comes to that. Regards the 190 size vs the 170: IMO the permanent bath on the 190 is not user friendly, so I'd option into the temporary bath anyway, and the fore/aft sleeping arrangement of the 190 only gives one extra inch of room, so the compact 170 wins in a shootout with the 190. Which is all before even mentioning MSRP.
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Old 04-09-2018, 12:23 AM   #8
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You could look at a Carado Axion. They are not selling well and some dealers have asked as low as $60k for an optioned up 2017 model with lithium 400, 2000w inverter, TV, solar, underhood generator. Much less claustrophobic than a 170 and still only 17'9" long. On a recent 1000 mile trip I got 17.4mpg on mine with a lot of 70mph cruising. Bed is way more comfy than sleeping on a seating area. Want to relax? Just reverse the passenger seat and turn the drivers seat towards it and use it for a foot rest. You can adjust recline etc. Caveats, the heat/hot water doesn't work above 3300 ft. altitude without mods (I'm researching this right now), combined holding tank, no spare without buying the rear mount kit, fridge a little hard to get to, and its kinda tall, so some drive throughs are off limits. Also, I plan eventually to upgrade the shocks (gas Bilsteins or Monroes) to increase body motion damping over undulations. Ventilation limited and don't know if you can get screens for side and back doors. There is insulation.

I use plug-in electric appliances (hot pot, toaster, skillet) for cooking and have never needed the cooktop. Center aisle is open from the back so you could carry your bike, but then you might the have to go around to the back doors to get to the toilet. At night when you fold the bed out into the aisle, you could probably put the bike in front of the sliding door, but would block the fridge.

I got mine to keep the dog cool when I need to leave the vehicle in hot weather. AC runs about 3 hours on the batteries, and they recharge in about 90 min. once you start driving.

And, don't forget that for convenience, shortness is greatness. Same U-turn as Honda Accord.

I'm all for keeping the length down, as I wish to be able to park the rig in my driveway. Can't say I'm impressed by the Carrado. From what I've seen they are put together like crap. Kinda looks like Hymer has little faith in the longevity of these units themselves, as they are only offering a warranty equal to 1/3 that of an Activ or a RT.
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Old 04-09-2018, 02:15 AM   #9
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Just for your information, my 2015 170 will be up for sale in June when my new rig shows up. It has two group 31s, solar, underhood generator, both cabinets up front, TV, and will be under 25k miles by that time. Doesn't have a continental kit, but I have the spare in storage. Still has 3 years of RT warranty...

Send me a PM if you want to talk about it.
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Old 04-09-2018, 04:21 AM   #10
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I'm all for keeping the length down, as I wish to be able to park the rig in my driveway. Can't say I'm impressed by the Carrado. From what I've seen they are put together like crap. Kinda looks like Hymer has little faith in the longevity of these units themselves, as they are only offering a warranty equal to 1/3 that of an Activ or a RT.
It’s great that you can afford something more upscale. I drove and considered an Aktiv before buying the Axion.

It and the Axion share the same chassis—it differs only in length (both have chassis upgrade features). Same drivetrain.

The electrical systems are pretty much identical and most of the appliances are identical or pretty similar except for the heat/hot water is better on the Aktiv.

The main difference is the cabinetry (still not bad) and the fit and finish (poor). The Aktiv has formed coverings hiding all the fasteners and screws, and many form fit interior panels that look nicer. There’s no medicine cabinet in the Axion even though there is space for one. Nor are there door screens. And the more expensive Promaster Roadtreks and the Aktiv have some features of questionable or negative value that I didn’t want, like those silly power steps and Voltstart.

But the critical equipment which will cost the most to have fixed if it breaks, is the same. And if that stuff is bad, it’s nearly as likely to show up in 2 years as it is in 5.

When I drove the Aktiv it was just as creaky and felt ponderous by comparison. And it’s much heavier with only about half the load carrying and towing capacity. Plus that skylight roars at freeway speeds. Carrying more than 2 people is not important to me. I do prefer the cassette toilet, though.

In the last decade or so, Roadtrek has not shown any interest in making annual upgrades in response to customer experiences. The Aktiv is unique because it is mostly a design that was already perfected in Europe.

Contrast that with Winnebago whose Travato models have both had pretty significant upgrades every year. If it were a foot shorter and I had the cash, I’d love a 59KL. Fit and finish is exquisite. Lots of little “surprise & delight” features. It’s only $145k which should eventually be available with a typical 20% discount for $116k. Exactly twice what I paid. Twice.

Add to all that the fact that Hymer/Roadtrek’s warranty fulfillment is largely theoretical in many areas. Even though they sign up more skilled RV repair-only experts to deal with the complexities that stupefy their average dealers, the only one of those near me is hopelessly backed up so I will have to wait weeks for even small repairs. In some areas (e.g. Washington state) they have no such fulfillment at all.

Fit and finish issues aren’t likely to ruin a camping trip or leave you by the roadside.

So for me the Axion represents sufficiency and value. If you want a van worthy of worship, pay up (way up) for a loaded Travato. If you don’t fit the Promaster driving position, buy Mumkin’s 170!
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Old 04-09-2018, 02:23 PM   #11
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Just for your information, my 2015 170 will be up for sale in June when my new rig shows up. It has two group 31s, solar, underhood generator, both cabinets up front, TV, and will be under 25k miles by that time. Doesn't have a continental kit, but I have the spare in storage. Still has 3 years of RT warranty...

Send me a PM if you want to talk about it.
Being as how you currently own a RT170 mumkin, I'd sure appreciate your assessment of your ownership experience with same, which was my initial question when I started this thread. What do you like? What don't you like? Has it met your needs or come up short?

Your location and asking price mumkin? I'm in AZ.
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Old 04-09-2018, 02:54 PM   #12
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We have owned Class Cs, the so called B+s, and four Bs over a thirty five year period. I have thought "What would I drive if I was a solo traveler and didn't have my wife to help me?". Long ago, I determined it would be a Roadtrek 170. I preferred the old 170 Popular over the Versatile, but a Versatile can certainly be configured to meet the need.

We had an Intervec Horizon at one time. It was on a Dodge 2500 chassis and was almost the same length of a RT 170, but taller. You can park anywhere, get great mileage and be perfectly comfortable with a 170 out in the BLM, NF, CoE and other great camping areas. Yes, the tanks are small but an experienced RVer like the OP can make do with that just fine. Personally, that is exactly what I would buy in a heartbeat.

Like the OP, I appreciate and understand the old tech stuff to the degree that I can feel comfortable to keep things running without a dealer to mess with. We don't travel for playing with new gadgets, we just want to enjoy and experience North America.

Check with Mumkin on his 170. He has been on these various B forums for years and his postings suggest he knows his business.

Paul
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Old 04-09-2018, 02:55 PM   #13
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It’s great that you can afford something more upscale. I drove and considered an Aktiv before buying the Axion.

It and the Axion share the same chassis—it differs only in length (both have chassis upgrade features). Same drivetrain.

The electrical systems are pretty much identical and most of the appliances are identical or pretty similar except for the heat/hot water is better on the Aktiv.

The main difference is the cabinetry (still not bad) and the fit and finish (poor). The Aktiv has formed coverings hiding all the fasteners and screws, and many form fit interior panels that look nicer. There’s no medicine cabinet in the Axion even though there is space for one. Nor are there door screens. And the more expensive Promaster Roadtreks and the Aktiv have some features of questionable or negative value that I didn’t want, like those silly power steps and Voltstart.

But the critical equipment which will cost the most to have fixed if it breaks, is the same. And if that stuff is bad, it’s nearly as likely to show up in 2 years as it is in 5.

When I drove the Aktiv it was just as creaky and felt ponderous by comparison. And it’s much heavier with only about half the load carrying and towing capacity. Plus that skylight roars at freeway speeds. Carrying more than 2 people is not important to me. I do prefer the cassette toilet, though.

In the last decade or so, Roadtrek has not shown any interest in making annual upgrades in response to customer experiences. The Aktiv is unique because it is mostly a design that was already perfected in Europe.

Contrast that with Winnebago whose Travato models have both had pretty significant upgrades every year. If it were a foot shorter and I had the cash, I’d love a 59KL. Fit and finish is exquisite. Lots of little “surprise & delight” features. It’s only $145k which should eventually be available with a typical 20% discount for $116k. Exactly twice what I paid. Twice.

Add to all that the fact that Hymer/Roadtrek’s warranty fulfillment is largely theoretical in many areas. Even though they sign up more skilled RV repair-only experts to deal with the complexities that stupefy their average dealers, the only one of those near me is hopelessly backed up so I will have to wait weeks for even small repairs. In some areas (e.g. Washington state) they have no such fulfillment at all.

Fit and finish issues aren’t likely to ruin a camping trip or leave you by the roadside.

So for me the Axion represents sufficiency and value. If you want a van worthy of worship, pay up (way up) for a loaded Travato. If you don’t fit the Promaster driving position, buy Mumkin’s 170!
Actually I like the Promaster chassis, which has the same 3.6 Pentastar that I have in my Challenger. Great engine, and I don't find the cab seating in the Promaster uncomfortable. I do however find the bolt upright dinette seating in the one Travato model terribly uncomfortable, and trying to use the beds in the other Travato model as a sofa is ridiculous. I don't want power steps or voltstart, or skylights either. Winnebago fit and finish is for sure at a higher level than some others. Kudos to them.
I don't merely seek sufficiency. I seek value for my dollar that gives me pride of ownership. A manufacturer who is unwilling to give me value for my dollar will not get my business. Just that simple. I can't even imagine owning something that gives me a feeling of having been fleeced, and that is exactly what a poorly built coach does for me. As to RT not upgrading over time on some models? Tried and true still works for me, as I've said elsewhere on this thread. If it ain't broke, why fix it?
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Old 04-09-2018, 03:01 PM   #14
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We have owned Class Cs, the so called B+s, and four Bs over a thirty five year period. I have thought "What would I drive if I was a solo traveler and didn't have my wife to help me?". Long ago, I determined it would be a Roadtrek 170. I preferred the old 170 Popular over the Versatile, but a Versatile can certainly be configured to meet the need.

We had an Intervec Horizon at one time. It was on a Dodge 2500 chassis and was almost the same length of a RT 170, but taller. You can park anywhere, get great mileage and be perfectly comfortable with a 170 out in the BLM, NF, CoE and other great camping areas. Yes, the tanks are small but an experienced RVer like the OP can make do with that just fine. Personally, that is exactly what I would buy in a heartbeat.

Like the OP, I appreciate and understand the old tech stuff to the degree that I can feel comfortable to keep things running without a dealer to mess with. We don't travel for playing with new gadgets, we just want to enjoy and experience North America.

Check with Mumkin on his 170. He has been on these various B forums for years and his postings suggest he knows his business.

Paul
Thank you, thank you Paul. Appreciate getting a direct answer to my query re: the RT170.
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Old 04-09-2018, 03:45 PM   #15
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backroads, glad I could offer some encouragement. If I was buying a 170 I would probably also consider having a cargo storage container for my trailer hitch in case I wanted to load more stuff for an extended trip to the boonies. I would just leave it at home for some trips and use it for others.

Exterior storage is limited and the 190 offers a lot more of that with the trade off of length. You can go to the Roadtrek.com site and click "Brochures" and "Support" tabs on the right side at the top of the opening page and get very detailed information for any make or model new or used back for years.

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Old 04-09-2018, 07:17 PM   #16
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backroads, glad I could offer some encouragement. If I was buying a 170 I would probably also consider having a cargo storage container for my trailer hitch in case I wanted to load more stuff for an extended trip to the boonies. I would just leave it at home for some trips and use it for others.

Exterior storage is limited and the 190 offers a lot more of that with the trade off of length. You can go to the Roadtrek.com site and click "Brochures" and "Support" tabs on the right side at the top of the opening page and get very detailed information for any make or model new or used back for years.

Paul
You're very welcome Paul, and thx for the RT "brochures and support" info. Yup, a receiver mount cargo box is the way to go for extra storage if needed. One thing full timing taught me for sure was minimalism. Maybe I had that down before getting into the lifestyle, because I had my **** whittled down to 100% onboard right from the get go. Took my bride at the time about 5 yrs to get to the point where she no longer needed a storage unit for her stuff. Even with that, when I transitioned back into a stick home I was amazed at all the stuff I pulled out of the nooks and crannies on the Alpenlite. Came across much that I had forgotten I even owned, so guess what, I didn't need it did I. I don't see taking off in an rv as being much different than taking off in the car is now. I take a carry on or two, some toiletries, a folding bike in the trunk, and I'm good to go for weeks at a time. With a rig, only extras would be a folding camp chair and table, bedding (travasak), some leveling blocks, groceries (mostly meals prepared at home that only need to be warmed up), some paperback books, and of course, beer. I doubt I'd even come close to filling all the storage space in a RT170.
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Old 04-10-2018, 05:06 AM   #17
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Check with Mumkin on his 170. He has been on these various B forums for years and his postings suggest he knows his business. l
Gee Thanks Paul... good to know that I make sense once in a while... but I'm a she, not a he.

Backroads...

The pros and cons rather go together. It's small, so it's easy to drive and park... but storage is limited. That is why I added the armoire and wardrobe, and put the extra seat cushion in storage. I schlepp lots of stuff back and forth between AZ and MN. But adding all that cabinetry really limits the living space. I'm small so it is fine for me and my small dog. But it is best for someone who lives out of the van, not in the van... which is common with most Class B users.

The smaller engine doesn't have the pep of the 6.0 in the 190, of course, but it sails right along at 70-75 on the interstates with no issues. The mileage is 11-13 mpg in town and 17-19 on the highway.

One detail that may affect you, but not me, is that one sleep crossways with the sofa down... and you better be rather short... or sleep on your side. LOL

I will send you further info by PM rather than public.
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Old 04-10-2018, 01:56 PM   #18
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Gee Thanks Paul... good to know that I make sense once in a while... but I'm a she, not a he.

Let this Okie apologize! I have noticed/read and followed your postings for about fifteen years on "the other B forum" we both joined back in the early 2000s.

We converted a 1982 2500 Chevy van ourselves when we were young and didn't know you never do a project like that in Oklahoma City in August when it is over a hundred every day. We put in a couch that made into our bed and it was located across the back of the van. It worked for us but was a little short. We had a blast with our old van. After we decided to by our first real B (Intervec Horizon) we found the gaucho couch in it worked fine also. Now, our bones were thirty years younger so the comfort of a bed is more of an issue now than back then for us.

Incidentally, after we got the Horizon, we kept the 82 Chevy, stripped out the stuff we had added and used it as a cargo van for years, finally giving it away to the Salvation Army in 2004. You could reasonably say we got our money's worth out of that vehicle



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Old 05-02-2018, 05:34 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Smith101 View Post
You could look at a Carado Axion. They are not selling well and some dealers have asked as low as $60k for an optioned up 2017 model with lithium 400, 2000w inverter, TV, solar, underhood generator. Much less claustrophobic than a 170 and still only 17'9" long. On a recent 1000 mile trip I got 17.4mpg on mine with a lot of 70mph cruising. Bed is way more comfy than sleeping on a seating area. Want to relax? Just reverse the passenger seat and turn the drivers seat towards it and use it for a foot rest. You can adjust recline etc. Caveats, the heat/hot water doesn't work above 3300 ft. altitude without mods (I'm researching this right now), combined holding tank, no spare without buying the rear mount kit, fridge a little hard to get to, and its kinda tall, so some drive throughs are off limits. Also, I plan eventually to upgrade the shocks (gas Bilsteins or Monroes) to increase body motion damping over undulations. Ventilation limited and don't know if you can get screens for side and back doors. There is insulation.

I use plug-in electric appliances (hot pot, toaster, skillet) for cooking and have never needed the cooktop. Center aisle is open from the back so you could carry your bike, but then you might the have to go around to the back doors to get to the toilet. At night when you fold the bed out into the aisle, you could probably put the bike in front of the sliding door, but would block the fridge.

I got mine to keep the dog cool when I need to leave the vehicle in hot weather. AC runs about 3 hours on the batteries, and they recharge in about 90 min. once you start driving.

And, don't forget that for convenience, shortness is greatness. Same U-turn as Honda Accord.
Don't forget about the awesome Brembo calipers and pads in the front and rear! Gotta love that Dodge has the Mopar division parts bin to pull from hehe!
silex840 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2018, 04:40 PM   #20
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Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: ARIZONA
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A big shout out and thank you to mumkin for graciously allowing me to poke my nose in all the nooks and crannies of her RT170, and for answering all of my endless questions.

I haven't purchased anything yet, and am still investigating all of the possible ways of getting back into camping. Where I'm at right now: A) I still feel the RT170 would fill all of my needs to a T, but unfortunately the 170 is no longer manufactured. A RT190 costs a bit more, but fills the same needs as the 170 in a slightly longer version. Investigating the CC&R's for my development gives me the distinct impression that a class B will be the only type RV I can park in my driveway and be compliant. B) Find myself intrigued by wayfarervans.com Their plug and play conversion kit for the Promaster comes in at $8,795 installed, which makes this type type set up very affordable. Alas, no bath, but there are ways around that. C) Am also intrigued by the Forest River GeoPro G14FK. This is an ultra small towable, but has it all. I've seen them offered new for as little $12,500. Would have to rent storage space for it, but have seen same in my area for as little as $43/mo. Initially, I'd probably rent a pickup as needed for this scenario, making it very attractive financially. I'd rather not tow, put am reconsidering that.
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