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Old 11-08-2019, 12:13 AM   #1
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Default Tools for the Road in an RV during Emergency Repairs

So anyone has a list of RV brake down tools? I am a bit of a DIY kind of person and I can put together a tool Box. I'm going from a Class A to a Class B, So my thoughts are not so much as before. But what to keep and what to add?

Also, I went to local Book stores to try and find a repair book for an RV. Funny only two found one from 1994-electrical systems and another 100-page for women. I know the vehicle will be an MB-Sprinter so I sure I will be able to find an auto book for that at an automotive store. Sure I know I can Call road service, but I always think about the What if's

TOOLS LIST This is not a must list just some I think would help in a jam and all tips and ideas welcomed.

Tool Box
Multimeter-Battery, Solar Panel tester
Hamer or shot filed mallet-tire checking.
Tire Gauge
Tire patch kit.
Roll of duck tape and non-burning rope-hold things together
heater holes clips
pliers
needlenose Pliers
Center Punch
Adjustable Wrench
Fuel Line Crimper
Hex Wrench Set
Water Bags
Socket Set
Standard & Phillips ScrewdriversBox Wrench
Air Pump electric
vice grips with wire cuter
Set of sockets metric and non-metric
FUSES 10, 15 and 20AMP
Wire
screw-drivers
Crowbar
Jack
Tire Blocks & Lifts
Knife Buck




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Old 11-08-2019, 01:02 AM   #2
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Pretty good list. I’ll add a couple of pieces of shrink tubing and an LED array on a headband all loaded in my Nantucket Tool Bag. And I always carry my 12v Drill set.
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Old 11-08-2019, 02:31 AM   #3
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If you're going to buy a Sprinter, look up the Sprinter Forum. Lots of useful information specific to the various generations.
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Old 11-08-2019, 01:02 PM   #4
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Pretty good list. Iíll add a couple of pieces of shrink tubing and an LED array on a headband all loaded in my Nantucket Tool Bag. And I always carry my 12v Drill set.
Thanks for the suggestions as I can see the LED Head wearing light with a RED light so as not to blind your night vision. YES, good call on the Shrink Tubing, for anyone who does not know. This is a rubber tube about 4"-inches long, When making a repair to wires you slide the tubing overheat and it shrinks covering your repair.

Now I'm showing my age as I don't always think about power tools. But I should as you are 100% correct on having one. Some good Calls Thanks for the suggestions.
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Old 11-08-2019, 02:14 PM   #5
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The tool kits I have seen being carried are often overly heavy and somewhat incorrectly stocked for the kind of things that most folks can realistically be able to fix on the road or in the campground (if allowed).


I carry a tool bag full of cheap, Harbor Freight, tools that is more than most folks would need, I think, because we would tackle more serious stuff than most would. Socket set, combo wrenches, adjustable wrenches, water pump pliers, multimeter, soldering iron, etc. may not be needed by many, except for adjustable wrenches and water pump pliers.


The most overlooked things, that are probably more likely to be needed. A set of small size pliers and wire cutter, usually 4-5 pieces, a stubby ratcheting screwdrive head, with 1/4 hex connection, a complete set of all the various screwhead types in 1/4 hex drive (maybe 20+ pieces), full sets of metric and english allen wrenches. Carrying full sets of all the different full size screwdrivers is a huge waste of space and money IMO. You then need to make sure you have any vehicle specific weird "stuff" like Robertson (square drive), torx, or any other specific tools that might be needed for the vehicle you have. If the bit set you get is a good one, it may cover all or most this kind of thing.


A good tire gauge, I prefer digital for normal use, but keep a good stick on in the van because the digital ones always seem to fail or kill the battery at the worst times.


Of course, I know that no matter what I carry, up to and including the entire home tool collection, the specific thing I need will not be with me when I need it. So...basically it is just a guess that is usually wrong
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Old 11-08-2019, 03:42 PM   #6
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Start with a general toolbox kit, duct tape, spare fuses, tire gauge, and if you have a Canadian built Class B, add the No. 1 and 2 Robertson screw drivers. Survey your RV and make sure you have the wrenches and sockets needed. Then when you encounter a new problem, buy the tool or part on the road to solve it and keep it in the RV because if you mix it with your shop tools you might not have it in one location or another when you next need it.
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Old 11-08-2019, 10:08 PM   #7
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I carry a pretty complete assortment of tools including multimeter soldering iron, and a Dremel grinder with cutoff wheels, carbide burrs etc. Likely overkill but you never know.

Since the Pleasure-Way Fiamma awning recall came out - I now have safety straps on our awning as well as having an additional toggle switch installed in the 12v feed to the awning controller.

We have not had any issues with our awning as yet, but now I am pretty sure it will not self-deploy while driving - as has happened to a few owners

But we do plan to continue to use the awning on an upcoming snowbird trip , and I suspect we might not have a resolution and fix for the awning by then, so I have to be prepared to deal with awning failure if that should happen when camping. I am carrying a telescoping ladder to remove/apply safety straps and in case needed for repairs!

After discussion with Fiamma I have also ensured that I have the tools I should need to remove the awning drive, and also to be able to wind the fabric back on the roller if the gears should fail and the emergency hand crank cannot be used.

The awning roller has a 1/2" male square drive on the end, so I made up a 1/2" drive ratchet extension bar with a female drive on each end!

As well, I am carrying some self-storing ratchet straps that should enable me to pull a failed awning back in so we could travel should the worst happen.

Usually when I prepare this way for eventualities, the eventuality never happens, and I will be quite happy if it turns out that way again - but if not, I'm as ready as I think I can be!

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Old 11-09-2019, 02:23 PM   #8
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I can add a few suggestions:
- nitrile gloves
- small tarp or large mat in case you have to get under or partially under the vehicle
- self-fusing silicone tape for hose repair
- electrical tape
- compressor
- torque wrench

My actual away from home necessary repairs that come to mind:
Class B Van - none that I recall
Car - had to plug a tire
Car - jump start
Car - replaced windshield wipers
Trailer related - cracked washer on hitch replaced
Class A - heater core leak, added valves to bypass core
Bicycle - inner tube patched

I carry a good assortment of tools because I'll often start & complete projects while away from home if on an extended trip such as: better faucet set installed, added a door to cover the propane fill on my van, replaced flapper seal on toilet in the Class A, added side mirrors on Class A, etc.
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Old 11-09-2019, 02:59 PM   #9
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Since most new vehicles use metric nuts and bolts, make sure that adjustable wrench is metric! JK!, but the hex wrenches and sockets should be metric.
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Old 11-09-2019, 05:42 PM   #10
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Since most new vehicles use metric nuts and bolts, make sure that adjustable wrench is metric!
I have the adjustable wrenches that handle both SAE and Metric!

Actually, my tool set is the one I assembled when living on a boat with the main diesel SAE and the get-home diesel metric... kind of forced me to carry both.
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Old 11-10-2019, 04:49 PM   #11
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For the last 20 years or so I've had a small canvas bag (been replaced a couple of time) with about 20 lbs of hand tool and a second bag with a mulimeter; I keep them in whatever vehicle I'm driving; at home i work out of these bags whether working on my truck, RV or tractor.

If I have to get tools out of the tool chest (which frequently happen) it is usually to do something that I would very unlikey to attemp on the road. Over time the assortment of tools in bag have gradually change as I've some rarely used tools are replaced by other;

Early on I had to make a rule about never getting a larger bag.

Also a carry a torgue wrench everything needed to change a tire in my Sprinter; if unable to change it myself I don't want roadside assistance to show up with the wrong sockets and no torque wrench.

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Old 11-10-2019, 05:06 PM   #12
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That was a good informative post and I do understand about not getting a larger bag. Keeping it simple. I'm old school and have to kind do everything myself. Maybe the Boy Scouts "Be Prepared" lol This post was also to give others some ideas of what would help to carry in the toolbox.

Trust me when I say this is not to take away from roadside assistance. They're Great!, I'm also seeing more of the ROAD RANGERS. Know very little about them, anyone?
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Old 11-10-2019, 05:30 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by PJ2016 View Post
For the last 20 years or so I've had a small canvas bag (been replaced a couple of time) with about 20 lbs of hand tool and a second bag with a mulimeter; I keep them in whatever vehicle I'm driving; at home i work out of these bags whether working on my truck, RV or tractor.

If I have to get tools out of the tool chest (which frequently happen) it is usually to do something that I would very unlikey to attemp on the road. Over time the assortment of tools in bag have gradually change as I've some rarely used tools are replaced by other;

Early on I had to make a rule about never getting a larger bag.

Also a carry a torgue wrench everything needed to change a tire in my Sprinter; if unable to change it myself I don't want roadside assistance to show up with the wrong sockets and no torque wrench.

2012 Pleasure Way Plateau
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Yep, never get a bigger bag, just readjust what you carry based on past or potential future needs. As I said earlier, always focus on tools that match your ability and are actually doable on the road (no engine rebuild stuff ).


The torque wrench thing is pretty interesting in how many carry one. It appears the constant chatter about using them to torque wheels has gotten through to most people. That said, I don't carry one with me or use one at home on the wheels (at home I use torque sticks on the impact wrench for wheels). I have checked hand tightening and torque sticks with a manual torque wrench and found that practiced hand tightening and torque sticks do an adequate job for me, usually well within +/- 10# between individual nuts and and within about 15# for actual torque, rarely to the low side. Checking torque that was set with the torque wrench again after doing it, will give similar type readings to the high side because of breakaway torque. I do understand that there is some risk to doing hand tight or no torque wrench, but if you watch a shop do the wheel mounting you may find many are using an impact wrench with no torque stick or the wrong one. I have checked out cars wheel not torque every time s shop has done them and rarely have found any to be anywhere near correct both to the loose and tight side and not even consistent on the same wheel. In general, I think it is a very good idea to have one if you have room for but it has to be a pretty big one at somewhere around 160# or higher rated.
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Old 11-11-2019, 12:22 AM   #14
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Yep, never get a bigger bag, just readjust what you carry based on past or potential future needs. As I said earlier, always focus on tools that match your ability and are actually doable on the road (no engine rebuild stuff ).


The torque wrench thing is pretty interesting in how many carry one. It appears the constant chatter about using them to torque wheels has gotten through to most people. That said, I don't carry one with me or use one at home on the wheels (at home I use torque sticks on the impact wrench for wheels). I have checked hand tightening and torque sticks with a manual torque wrench and found that practiced hand tightening and torque sticks do an adequate job for me, usually well within +/- 10# between individual nuts and and within about 15# for actual torque, rarely to the low side. Checking torque that was set with the torque wrench again after doing it, will give similar type readings to the high side because of breakaway torque. I do understand that there is some risk to doing hand tight or no torque wrench, but if you watch a shop do the wheel mounting you may find many are using an impact wrench with no torque stick or the wrong one. I have checked out cars wheel not torque every time s shop has done them and rarely have found any to be anywhere near correct both to the loose and tight side and not even consistent on the same wheel. In general, I think it is a very good idea to have one if you have room for but it has to be a pretty big one at somewhere around 160# or higher rated.
Guess I'm at the other end of the spectrum; a torgue wrench is not on my optional tool list.

Paul






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Old 11-11-2019, 12:22 AM   #15
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You guys have posted excellent tools suggestions.

I've found a Milwaukee 18v 1/2" drive impact gun and a floor jack to be helpful.
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Old 11-11-2019, 12:43 AM   #16
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Guess I'm at the other end of the spectrum; a torgue wrench is not on my optional tool list.

Paul

I would never say that is a bad choice. Unless you are very comfortable with going without, and have checked your accuracy, it is the wise thing to do to carry a torque wrench. Of course you do need to get them calibrated regularly or build a home checker with weights. The "clickers" are notorious for going out of accuracy frequently, especially if they get dirty a lot.



All said though, for me wheel nut torque is one that is not particularly critical to an exact number. The studs are a long ways from yield, so tight enough is the biggest deal, as long as they are even. You would never, ever, see me not use a torque wrench on head bolts (either normal or torque to yield) or any other critical torque part. There are a lot of the critical ones these days, including oil pans, front covers, etc as the engines and transmissions are quickly going to using all parts as structural elements. Get the torque wrong or tightened out of pattern and steps and the bores and such can go out of shape or flatness.
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Old 11-11-2019, 04:22 PM   #17
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If properly torqued, I probably could not break a lug nut without a long-handled torque wrench at my age. Which is another reason besides dismantling an RV sized tire that my first tool is AAA.
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Old 11-12-2019, 05:39 AM   #18
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Most of these responses are about tools for chassis problems. I also carry many tools for the house side too. 18v battery drill, work and flashlights. Screwdriver sets. Big sockets for water heater anode. Tools to drain fresh water. Zip ties. Tapes. Screws.
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Old 11-12-2019, 11:48 AM   #19
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I have to admit I’m surprised people can find the space in a Class B for things like floor jacks. When I had a DP with slide out basement trays it was different, but now I don’t really carry anything for chassis mechanical fixes. The torque wrench, compressor and 3/4 inch socket set stay at home in the barn and I rely on road services. I take enough to patch up pretty much anything else.
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Old 11-12-2019, 03:32 PM   #20
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We tow a 5x8 trailer behind the van, with our two dual sport motorcycles inside, so we have a little more cargo space than most. We carry a spare tire for the trailer, Viair air compressor, a fairly comprehensive Crescent toolkit (sockets, pliers, wrenches, screw drivers, driver bits, etc), wheel chocks, a 12K rated bottle jack, duck tape, electrical tape, several sizes of zip ties, WD-40, 2 cans of motorcycle chain lube, 2 quarts of 10W-40 oil, OBD2 code reader, breaker bar, 2 5-gallon gas cans and in the winter time a set of chains for both the van and the trailer.

Oh, and also a set of motorcycle tire spoons, 2 spare tubes and a tube patch kit that stays in the tailbag of my bike...
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