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Old 05-24-2020, 01:29 PM   #1
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Default Blu TPMS

Is anyone here using Blu TPMS distributed by Advanced Accessory Concepts? Or, any opinions on it? Online reviews are few and varied.

https://www.aacbrands.com/

Their TPMS specific site:
BLU Technology Products | Products

Some searching seems to indicates that Sysgration Ltd. designed & manufactures the product line.

https://www.sysgration.com/en/tpms-overview

Sysgration appears to be a well established automotive tech company.

Camping World & RV Upgrades & other sites sell the TPMS system:

https://www.campingworld.com/electro...Concepts%20Llc

https://www.rvupgradestore.com/searc...ology+Products

Monitoring is via App or Voice Dongle. Sysgration has display + voice dongles but I can't find where to purchase the TA-86.

Optional dongles:
https://www.sysgration.com/en/ble-tp...or-accessories

AAC's Blu TPMS App from the Play Store seems good. https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...m.blu.tpms.app

I think Sysgration's apps will also work. https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...Sysgration+Ltd

A quick test swinging a bag containing the well boxed sensors showed that the sensors and app works. The voice alert is specific - Right rear tire pressure low. Left front tire pressure low. Etc.

There is a note that the 100 psi units might only report pressures up to 92 psi "due to variations in electronic tolerances".

I think they'd be OK for my van with 80psi rears as my understanding is that a 10% increase in pressure caused by temperature indicates a tire problem that needs to be solved.

I like that you can specify different settings for the front and rear tires.

The aluminum alloy valve stem design appears to isolate the alloy from touching the painted steel rims. Should I be concerned about the aluminum alloy valve stems at all?

I got the 4 internal sensors for $99 + tax on Amazon so not too many options around that price and that allow different settings for the front and rear tires.

Just trying to decide if I should get them installed on the van. The hesitation is due to alloy stems, 92psi limit of some sensors & always needing a phone unless I purchase the voice dongle.

Blu TPMS 1.png

Blu TPMS 3.png

Blu TPMS 4.png

Blu TPMS 5.png

Blu TPMS 6.png
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Old 05-24-2020, 03:52 PM   #2
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I'm satisfied with my $40 TPMS system from Amazon


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1



Mike
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Old 05-24-2020, 05:59 PM   #3
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Thanks Mike - sure is easier to go with external sensors & very tempting - but I think internal is the way to go if I do it. They will give more accurate temperature info as they're not being cooled by ambient air. I recently learned that there will be less pressure variation reported as you climb to higher altitudes. I want alarm set points at 10% low & 10% high and that means very different set points for the front tires and for the rear tires because I'm not likely to be watching yet another display often enough for an early warning.
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Old 05-24-2020, 07:27 PM   #4
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Tough choice on internal vs external, especially if the internal read absolute pressure. No doubt that the internal are less hassle and at least for temperature more accurate, but the external are easy and you can replace the batteries. With a lot of use getting near 10 years on a set of tires, you would have to pay for an install/mount/balance on a set of tires somewhere along the line, I think, especially on ones that say maybe as little as 3 years battery life.


On the aluminum stems. Are they anodized or hardcoated to stop any possible corrosion?
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Old 05-24-2020, 10:24 PM   #5
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I don't know if the valve stems are anodized & can't find any info on them. The part that tightens down has a very loose tolerance IMO and what appears to me to be a plastic ring clipped in there that fits up against the outside of the rim. I'm not talking about the rubber piece.

I think I've talked myself out of using them. They're likely very well engineered etc. but I have to be comfortable using them.

valve stem.JPG





I'd be much happier with the truck version shown on Sysgration's website.

bsi-03t.jpg
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Old 05-24-2020, 10:57 PM   #6
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Those look like the stems on my 72 Eldo.
( excepting the sensor!)


slid black heat shrink tubing over the stem- black looks better



That design does well


mike
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Old 05-25-2020, 02:17 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markopolo View Post
I don't know if the valve stems are anodized & can't find any info on them. ..............
Anodized surface has lower reflectance than freshly machined aluminum. It is also easy to test by conductivity, aluminum oxide is a very good insulator, it is very hard just like rubies or sapphires, both aluminum oxide crystals as well. Light touch with a dull ohmmeter probe should not penetrate through oxide.

For folks interested in rubies and sapphires, both are well engineered into good mechanical watches, rubies inside and sapphire outside.
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Old 05-25-2020, 03:27 PM   #8
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Thank you for the help and sharing your knowledge George Much appreciated.

I tested several spots including threaded areas and there's no conductivity at all. I also tested some shiny flat stock aluminum from the hardware store for comparison and did get continuity.

The Blu TPMS internal sensors are installed. After the conductivity test I noticed beveled ends on the piece that tightens down (aka nut) and its mate. The slop would diminish when tightened down. Those two factors allayed my concerns enough to have them installed.

The guy who actually does the tire work at the dealership shared some of my concerns about the light duty appearance but explained that he sees that type of stem often now and he would use them even though like me, he'd prefer something that was more obviously clearly heavy duty.

My Google search yesterday showed similar stems on many internal TPMS offerings. If you want internal sensors your choice appears to be this type of stem or rim bands.

I decided to trust the engineering of this product.

My total cost was approx USD $135 for the sensors and installation and mounting and balancing and a bonus tire rotation. The price of the Blu sensors varies greatly among retailers.

Blu tpms installed 1.png


Blu tpms installed 2.png


The pressures were set at the dealership. Temperature was after a short drive home. The van is back in my garage and I'll adjust the pressure to what I want tomorrow morning.
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Old 05-28-2020, 07:09 PM   #9
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The phone app logs date, time, pressure, temperature & battery(?) in CSV format. I noted today's lows and highs:

Code:
         Temp    PSI
Front     79F    66.4
Right    102F    70.0
        
Front    72F    65.3
Left    104F    70.7
        
Rear     72F    83.4
Right    99F    88.1
        
Rear     72F    82.7
 Left    102F    88.8
and used my data with this pressure calculator -> Martin Schmaltz' pressure calculator <- and it confirmed that the increase in pressure caused by increased temperature is what would be expected.

I started the day 2 or 3 psi high because I last set the tire pressure 2 days ago on a much cooler morning. Interesting lesson/reminder to check and set tire pressure often.
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