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Old 05-02-2021, 06:09 PM   #1
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Default tires cracked ,, Just curious????

Hi
OK, before I ask my Q ,,,I am going to rplace my tires.
Not happy with how long they lasted BUT ,,,biting the bullet.
The tires are WRANGLER HT - SIZE: LT245/75R16
replacing with (I think???)MICHELIN® Defender® LTX® M/S ... the Michelin seem to be popular here??
Anyway , I was calmly drinking my coffee this AM when the dreaded quedtion came up from my wife ( I just hate these kind of questions). How come the tire on the Roadtrek fail (wearout) so much sooner then my (our) VW?
I thought for a minite or two and said ..
Maybe because they carry so much more weight. Run at so much higher tire presure .
That seemed to satisfy her , but when I started to think about the question I decided it did not satisfy me.
So I tried to shearch on the web ,,,did not really find anything that explained the Q well. Searched the arcives here and did not really find anything that explained hte quick where factors
.So I thought i'd ask. s I said I'mgetting new tires no dought about that ,and I don't want to start a contentius thread , I'm just darn courious why the tires have gone bad
they are three years old
about 14k miles
I do not cover the tires ...but I don't cover the tires on our VW either, both tires are in the same climate and weather etc.
If anything the RV tires get a break fron the Florida weather conditions in the summer.
we uae or at least move the RV every 2 weeks or so .
So Is 3 years the life of a $200 dollare tire ??? maybe I'm expecting to much? 14 k ???
I'll be interested in responces.
Thanks
M
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Old 05-02-2021, 06:49 PM   #2
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Totally different experience with our Roadtrek. Basically the tires (Michelins) lasted forever, we just replaced them at the 6 or 7 year mark for safety sake. We never put that much mileage on them, but certainly more than 14K miles over 6 or 7 years.
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Old 05-02-2021, 07:09 PM   #3
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I just replaced 4 Michelins LT24575T16 on my 2008C210P. They had just passed the 5 year mark and 55,000 miles. The treads were in good condition and any cracking was not serious, but we are about to start on a long trip and I believe in an abundance of caution...I have had 2 tire failures and do not want to repeat that experience. Besides, my 210P just about maxes out the tire weight limit on the rear. I don't use tire covers either and the vehicle has spent the past 18 months in Southern Arizona. Peace of mind is worth another few thousand miles or an extra year, but I will add that your tire life is exceptionally low. Oh, I did replace the Michelins with new Michelins.
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Old 05-02-2021, 07:52 PM   #4
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Some tires are more prone to cracking than others. A while ago people had some cracking problems with Michelins, but I haven’t heard of that recently.

When I bought my 2006 Roadtrek 210 in 2011 the original Bridgestone V-Steel tires were 5 years old and had cracking. I replaced with the same V-Steels and used 303 Protectant like I had been using for many years on tires with good results. At 5 years on these tires I had no cracking at all on the sun side, so the 303 did the job. There was some minor cracking on the side not facing the sun. I have read that sun is the biggest factor in cracking, but ozone can also cause cracking, so this is what was happening to the non-sun side. So when I replaced the tires, I again have used the 303 treatment, but I also started treating the non-sun side when I rotate the tires. I have 4 years on the tires and there is no cracking on either side. So the 303 works well.

I try to apply the 303 monthly but sometimes I go more than that between applications.
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Old 05-02-2021, 09:46 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mangomike View Post
Hi
OK, before I ask my Q ,,,I am going to rplace my tires.
Not happy with how long they lasted BUT ,,,biting the bullet.
The tires are WRANGLER HT - SIZE: LT245/75R16
replacing with (I think???)MICHELIN® Defender® LTX® M/S ... the Michelin seem to be popular here??
Anyway , I was calmly drinking my coffee this AM when the dreaded quedtion came up from my wife ( I just hate these kind of questions). How come the tire on the Roadtrek fail (wearout) so much sooner then my (our) VW?
I thought for a minite or two and said ..
Maybe because they carry so much more weight. Run at so much higher tire presure .
That seemed to satisfy her , but when I started to think about the question I decided it did not satisfy me.
So I tried to shearch on the web ,,,did not really find anything that explained the Q well. Searched the arcives here and did not really find anything that explained hte quick where factors
.So I thought i'd ask. s I said I'mgetting new tires no dought about that ,and I don't want to start a contentius thread , I'm just darn courious why the tires have gone bad
they are three years old
about 14k miles
I do not cover the tires ...but I don't cover the tires on our VW either, both tires are in the same climate and weather etc.
If anything the RV tires get a break fron the Florida weather conditions in the summer.
we uae or at least move the RV every 2 weeks or so .
So Is 3 years the life of a $200 dollare tire ??? maybe I'm expecting to much? 14 k ???
I'll be interested in responces.
Thanks
M

Hi: Just got email message from Americas Tire Store. Michelin on sale from May 1-16. Something like $160 rebate for set of 4. I will be in market for new tires next year. Tires are 5 years old and only 12-13K miles on them.
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Old 05-03-2021, 12:32 AM   #6
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3 years is nuts- I'd be back at the tire shop



I had tires replaced by sams club for premature sidewall cracking on my pickup- bridgestones I thing

6 years is what you should get unless the tread is used up first


I have posted on the michelin agilis we have now on our chev based pleasure way- we like them


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Old 05-09-2021, 03:56 PM   #7
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Default Depends on how and where you drive...

My Michelin Defenders are 4 years old and have 36,000 miles on them..... but, they are driven on long cross country trips cruising on the open road....

I absolutely agree that tires need replacement regardless of mileage every 5 or 6 years....

Look at it this way; your tires are the ONLY thing between you and the road....

If you don't think that's important consider a blowout, rolling over, being stranded or risking injury to yourself and others...... it's definitely not worth any money you think you're saving.....

Go ahead and buy the new tires and use them..... tires are really inexpensive compared to everything else on your vehicle including you.....
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Old 05-09-2021, 04:12 PM   #8
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Cracking in 3 years means that Goodyear Wranglers are junk. I've had great luck w/ Continental and Michelin so I'd recommend either of those.
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Old 05-09-2021, 04:24 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 View Post
I absolutely agree that tires need replacement regardless of mileage every 5 or 6 years....
Agree with whom, exactly?

I don't know of any tire manufacturer who recommends unconditional replacement at that age. Typically, they recommend beginning routine inspection at that time, with unconditional replacement at 10 years.

Typical examples:

Michelin:
Quote:
1. Keep five years in mind

After five years or more in use, your tires should be thoroughly inspected at least once per year by a professional.

2. Ten years is a maximum

If the tires haven't been replaced 10 years after their date of manufacture, as a precaution, Michelin recommends replacing them with new tires. Even if they appear to be in usable condition and have not worn down to the tread wear indicator. This applies to spare tires as well.
https://www.michelinman.com/auto/tip...-replace-tires


Cooper:
Quote:
Cooper® Tire is not aware of scientific or technical data that establishes or identifies a specific minimum or maximum service life for passenger and light truck tires. However, Cooper® recognizes a consumer benefit from a more uniform, global industry-wide approach to the tire service life issue. Accordingly, Cooper® recommends that all tires, including full-size spares, that are 10 or more years from their date of manufacture, be replaced with new tires. Tires 10 or more years old should be replaced even if the tires appear to be undamaged and have not reached their tread wear limits. Most tires will need replacement before 10 years due to service conditions. This may be necessary even if the tire has not yet reached its tread wear limits.
https://us.coopertire.com/safety/rep...e-service-life
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Old 05-09-2021, 04:44 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by avanti View Post
Agree with whom, exactly?

I don't know of any tire manufacturer who recommends unconditional replacement at that age. Typically, they recommend beginning routine inspection at that time, with unconditional replacement at 10 years.

Typical examples:

Michelin:


https://www.michelinman.com/auto/tip...-replace-tires


Cooper:


https://us.coopertire.com/safety/rep...e-service-life
The above applies to automobile tires, not RV's. But hey, what you do is your business!

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Old 05-09-2021, 04:58 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilmor View Post
The above applies to automobile tires, not RV's.
Why do you say that?
Can you supply a link to RV-specific recommendations from a tire OEM?
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Old 05-09-2021, 05:07 PM   #12
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Default Thank you..

Quote:
Originally Posted by ilmor View Post
The above applies to automobile tires, not RV's. But hey, what you do is your business!

https://www.crossroadstrailers.com/blog/knowing-when-to-replace-your-rv-tires/#:~:text=The%20common%20rule%20of%20thumb,as%20lon g%20as%20six%20years.

As a point of information.. you're absolutely right that RV tires are not the same as automobile tires, but, if you want to be safe on the road, it's prudent to follow this advice.....

Not at all surprised by people who disagree with this..... very sad .. here's another source.....

Just because the moderator disagrees with this doesn't mean he's correct.



RV Tires,

between three and six years
The common rule of thumb for changing your RV tires is anywhere between three and six years. If you are on the road often, and you think your tires need to be changed, then it may not be possible to last as long as six years.Sep 8, 2015
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Old 05-09-2021, 05:44 PM   #13
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Default Another source of information for tire replacement; what price do you put on your saf

https://drivingpress.com/when-to-change-rv-tires/

Again, if you read the numerous sources online you're going to find a general consensus that 6 years is the recommended replacement ..... not 10 years....

Go ahead.... make your own decisions.....

It's your life..... What price do you put on your safety?

Article except.... I seriously don't think this was written for shits and giggles.....

So How Long Do RV Tires Last, Really?

Generally, RV tires are designed to last for around 3-5 years. That said, you need to observe your RV tires closely after 3 years have passed. You need to check the tires for any signs of damage and wear, including bulging, uneven wear found at the treads, cracks, or any other indications of abnormality.

It is also advisable to begin planning to fund the replacement of the tires after around five years. If the tires in your RV are already 6 to 7 years then maybe it is time to think about replacing them. Even if they do not seem to look bad or do not malfunction yet, it is still crucial to replace them during that period as anytime soon, they might ruin your trip.

Timeframe – Another vital factor to take into consideration is the specific timeframe since the last time you have changed or replaced the tire. The general guideline is actually to change the tire when it is already running for around 3-6 years. However, if you are often on the road then you can’t expect it to last for up to 6 years.

If you use it only occasionally then you might be able to make it last for a max of 6 years. It is not recommended, however, to still use the same tires after the 6-year mark. You will need to replace them after that period to guarantee your safety.
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Old 05-09-2021, 05:54 PM   #14
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I see articles and blogs by sellers and individuals of unknown knowledge.


Where are the ones from those that actually make the tires, and also would profit from you replacing every 3 years.


Anyone who roundly proclaims that "it is widely accepted" without the references is not worth listening to, IMO. How do they know they are designed to last 3-5 years. The article also says if you drive more they fail sooner. Maybe wear out sooner, but most of what the manufactures say about it would indicate sitting on the tires is worse, and even recommend putting the vehicle on stands with the tires off the ground for long periods of sitting.
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Old 05-09-2021, 06:05 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 View Post
Just because the moderator disagrees with this doesn't mean he's correct.
The only claim "the moderator" made was that he is unaware of any tire manufacturer who recommends routine tire replacement at the intervals you claim. I can assure you that this statement (about what he is aware of) is true.

Can you provide counter-examples?
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Old 05-09-2021, 06:17 PM   #16
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When buying new tires, be sure to check the date code on them before they get mounted on your rims. If that date code is not recent, take your business elsewhere.
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Old 05-09-2021, 07:11 PM   #17
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Congress directed NHTSA to determine why passenger vehicle tires were failing (Firestone) and Ford Explorers were rolling over injuring (and killng) soccer moms and kids. Probably 1980s. It was fairly well established by the National Rubber Manufacturers Association, and published test data by individual tire manufacturers and even the FAA that underinflation and overloading were clearly primary known causative factors in peventable tire failures followed by defects in material and workmanship. NHTSA commissioned accelerated aging tests that are published online for anyone interested in reading them. In summary the major brand name tires did very well during the entire test series. Several "off" brands experienced entire sample set blow outs during the high temperature and high oxygen level initial test phase.. ( Clear message there go with major Brand names) A smoking gun for tire age was not found excluding manufacturing and materials causes. No federal age tire age regulations were deemed appropriate. However, A Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) was enacted for tire by Congress followed shortly by a mandate for TPMS installation in New passenger vehicles. RV trailer tires were not subject to that FMSS. (Trailer tire failures do not pose as much loss of control and injury risk as passenger vehicle tires)
Michelin published a photo series, available to the public, showing what degree of sidewall checking is acceptable in their product line. Most tire shops seem to ignore Michelin's guidance and call for replacement with lesser checking than Michelin's official guidance allows.
Suggestions, consider checking for tire manufacturer's recalls. Be very aware of mid speed-range vibrations that develop suddenly - which are an indication of tire delamination prior to sudden failure and check tires very carefully for signs of delamination at first signs of sudden vibration onset. Of course keep a good tire pressure gauge in your vehicle and use it.
Do an internet search for "Michelin, Nevada DOT, Recreational Vehicle Manufacturer's Association and Tire Blow Out Loss Of Control" for YouTube video of triggered tire blow outs and how to assure control of your RV. The demonstrated technique is not intuitive and the physics are too involved to discuss in this post.
BJ
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Old 05-09-2021, 07:14 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadtrek Adventuous RS1 View Post
https://www.crossroadstrailers.com/blog/knowing-when-to-replace-your-rv-tires/#:~:text=The%20common%20rule%20of%20thumb,as%20lon g%20as%20six%20years.

As a point of information.. you're absolutely right that RV tires are not the same as automobile tires, but, if you want to be safe on the road, it's prudent to follow this advice.....

Not at all surprised by people who disagree with this..... very sad .. here's another source.....

Just because the moderator disagrees with this doesn't mean he's correct.



RV Tires,

between three and six years
The common rule of thumb for changing your RV tires is anywhere between three and six years. If you are on the road often, and you think your tires need to be changed, then it may not be possible to last as long as six years.Sep 8, 2015
Are you getting RV tires for your van, which ones?...... I recently....... replaced tires...... on my van....... but they were not RV tires. .......
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Old 05-09-2021, 07:51 PM   #19
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Default Michelin Defenders

Hi George, see pictures....do these meet with your approval?

They are all from 2017 and yes, as far as I know they are designed for my Sprinter... LTX 215/85 R16 tires

And, yes, I have dual wheels in the back of my Sprinter....

Next time I'll be replacing them with Michelin Agillis models.

What tires did you buy?
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Old 05-09-2021, 08:14 PM   #20
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We have two Roadtreks, two full size pickups, two full size SUVs and a couple of Porsches and Vettes and I think fourteen trailers as well as heavy construction equipment.. For the Roadtreks I usually use 245 75 16 LT ( light truck) HT ( highway tread) as opposed to mud and snow or off road tread tires in load range E. Our business' usually run around 200 vehicles. I found that Michelin car and light truck tires tended to show signs of early dry rot causing premature replacement and several of the long term tire/service shops we do a lot of business with have said Michelins are great tires if you drive a lot but sidewall and between tread cracking causes are a well know problem for that brand throughout the industry. (Michelin may have changed their rubber compounding, materials engineering, manufacturing or materials sourcing in recent years to address this.) The Chevy 3,500 series chassis under our Roadtreks is basically the same as Chevy one ton or 3,500 series pickups. So the tire size mentioned above is not specifically an RV tire. Trailers are a different story. They call for ST (Special Trailer). I have found that LT (as opposed to ST tires) which conform to FMMSS for passenger vehicle tire in load range E, or particularly Goodyear Endurance in ST designation but again in load range E have provided the best longevity for our trailers by a WIDE margin.. I have had mixed results with load range F "all steel" ST trailer tires. Goodyear Endurance ST tires are made in the U S ( very rare) for trailer tires and cost maybe fifty percent more than "China bombs". I have had China Bombs blow out sitting new - nerver on the road - in three years after DOT date of manufacture code !
Put simply the only ST tire I buy now are Goodyear Endurance Load Range E. As for Roadtrek tires for me any major brand name other than Michelin and no off brand.
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